Playing Andy de Jarlis

Playing Andy de Jarlis

I am a fairly new fiddler and downloaded Andy de Jarlis which is in E major, and want to ask if most of you play the recurring B note by stretching for it on the D string, instead of on the A string.

Thanks
John

Re: Playing Andy de Jarlis

While I can’t speak for most of us, I’d be surprised if _anybody_ did. Is it fear of crossing a string for one note that is causing you to opt for left-hand contortion instead?

Re: Playing Andy de Jarlis

I prefer to hold down both A an D strings at the same time with my index finger to play the E an B notes and play G# with my third finger.

Re: Playing Andy de Jarlis

Thanks for both for the comments.

I tried stretching for the B because I was having difficulty crossing the strings with any consistency and/or speed. I took a lesson recently and the teacher said whenever possible stay on the same string, and I have long fingers so the stretch seemed like a possibility.

I’ll try stoneboy2’s suggestions about holding both strings down with one finger and see how that feels.

Re: Playing Andy de Jarlis

Sounds like your lesson was from a classical teacher! Not always applicable to trad - for one thing we stay in the first position (that’s 97% of us, 98% of the time).

For another, while using the fourth finger to save crossing a string is a handy thing to have in your bag of tricks, you won’t use it to stay on a string "whenever possible". We tend to like the sound of an open string.

At any rate stretching to reach B in that tune is, well, stretching things. Holding down E and B at the same time, as mentioned by stoneboy2, is standard practice - so standard it didn’t occur to me to mention it in my first post, but I should have done.
Cheers and good luck.

Re: Playing Andy de Jarlis

Thanks Jeeve, I too like the sound of open strings, and am interested in the traditional approach, so later today I’ll try holding them both down together.

John

Re: Playing Andy de Jarlis

To be fair, holding the first finger down on D and A strings and crossing strings for the B would be standard in both trad playing and classical. I think you’ve just misunderstood your teacher’s instructions.

Posted by .

Re: Playing Andy de Jarlis

And talking about open strings, most people would play the A in Bar 4 and the top Es in Bar 8 as open strings, maybe doubling the Es with a 4th finger, slid up to the note. Great, typical fiddle effect. :-)

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Re: Playing Andy de Jarlis

Thanks Ben I’ll try that
John

Re: Playing Andy de Jarlis

I had a look at the tune here :

https://thesession.org/tunes/838

Just to more or less echo what every one else has said, possibly reinforced by the fact that you need to play a C right after the B (eg in bar 2) … which would get really messy if you tried to play an ascending E-G-B-C on the one string.

A little diversion - an exception would be something like Paganini Caprice # 5. An extremely fast one, where the pattern is similar (A-C-E-C, starting on the bottom string), but at high speed, it’s actually easier to ‘dance’ up and down a single string, rather than cross a string, then cross back. Advanced technique, but still based on very simple and effective mechanics.

Re: Playing Andy de Jarlis

Q: What has Paganini Caprice # 5 got to do with the OP ?

A: Feck-all.

…Jeez.

Re: Playing Andy de Jarlis

[*What has Paganini Caprice # 5 got to do with the OP ?*]

I’ve explained why one might want to play a pattern on one string, where the most common way to play it would be across two strings. That’s the relevance to the OP.

Re: Playing Andy de Jarlis

Back to the tune for a moment. I like Altan’s version and can hear all the ornamentation which is great, but trying to figure it all out is a bit of a challenge. Can anyone point me to a site where the sheet music would have more ornamentation for traditional tunes like this.

Thanks
John

Re: Playing Andy de Jarlis

Far better to use your ears and "fiddle about" until the sound you make resembles the sound they make. Or even better, get a fiddle player to show you. Even if you could find a site with the appropriate sheet music, correctly interpreting ornamentation written on sheet music is quite tricky if you don’t have an understanding of it to begin with.