How did you get into traditional irish music?

How did you get into traditional irish music?

So, I was listening to some Iron Maiden today, attempting to figure out how to bring "Run to the Hills" onto mandolin, and started wondering what was attractive to me, about metal. Then I started thinking about traditional irish music, and figured I’d ask: How did you get into traditional irish music? what music did you listen to before, do you see any similarities? differences?
I enjoy hearing stories from other people and learning. Posting topics like this can help with that sometimes.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

My grandmothers introduced me to it early on. I of course rejected it, seduced instead by rock and roll. After spending some years chasing the neon rainbow of rock and pop music, I came back to Irish music in my late 20’s. To be specific, it was Luke Kelly’s voice and Barney McKenna’s banjo that roped me back in. Strangely, I also discovered that all those tunes I had heard in my grandmothers’ houses had somehow soaked into my grey matter. When I set about learning tunes on my own, I found many of the melodies already in my head. Weird, but wonderful.

One final comment - I think Maiden’s "The Trooper" guitar riffs would be far more fun to learn on the mando - Enjoy!

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

When I was about 10 years old my mother brought home a compilation CD of Irish music with severall well known songs on it and some tunes. Mind you I live in Belgium, so it was probably the only way I would ever get in touch with irish music. And offcourse it had the Rocky Road to Dublin, Wild Rover, etc… on it. But it also had Scarce O’tatties and Ballinasloe on it, and however I liked singing along to all the well known songs, it’s listening to these last two tunes I liked the most. Never did it crossed my mind to play an instrument at that time in my life. I am 26 now, play the box, mainly French/Belgian/Dutch/Italian folk songs. But I am trying to learn myself some ITM. Am on the lookout for a BC box at the moment. So more an ITM listener then a player at this time :-)

Posted by .

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

My Mother was a good dancer and my father hated dancing, so when I was old enough, she would take me out on the floor. It was 1972 in Boston, MA. I had started violin lessons at 4, so had made it through Suzuki book 6 by then. I distinctly remember watching the fiddler on stage who was having such a good time and thinking that was what I wanted to do when I grew up…I joined a dance band in High School and played for contradances all over the Boston area. In college, I majored in Ethnomusicology, doing an exam on the history of bluegrass and Americana music, my first exposure to Scots-Irish and Anglo-Irish music of the 19th and 20th centuries (what we now call "traditional Irish music). I traveled to Ireland in 1996 to take lessons with Frankie Gavin and play in the pubs in Kilfenora and Galway. Since then, I’ve been playing what I simply call Celtic music with my colleague Jamie Bunting in our little duo Celticado http://celticado.net

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

Suzuki book 6? High five! Seriously.

I stumbled upon trad. I consider myself very lucky to have. I suppose the Narada and Shanachie publishing companies were the largest reason, as I was just looking for world and new age music at the time. (It was the early 90s, and I was young; judge all you like. :D) When I heard performers like Alisdair Fraser and Altan, though, that pretty much locked me in to the genre.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

by the time i was old enough to be aware of my surroundings i became aware that my surroundings were irish pubs, heritage centers, and gigs that my uncle was playing at across chicagoland. everyone there seemed to be having more fun than at preschool and on the playground, so i thought that i’d have to get in on it.

lucky for me my uncle and grandma happened to be steeped in the tradition. my grandma learned her music from her own mother and passed it on to us. i heard irish songs from my mother around the house, because when she was a child she thought it was more fun to hang out with her aunts and learn the old songs than play in the basement with her cousins.

my grandma played with me long enough to make sure that i had the music for good and then put her fiddle away. she made sure that i met her cousin, who took the job up of getting my music to that next level. by now, i’m on my own, playing the same tunes that they taught me and letting life shape my music as it may.

oh, and this is the best lesson my grandma ever gave me: "listen. listen. listen." that, and when i was an undergraduate she sent me a new york times interview with martin hayes in the mail. she told me that i should listen to him. so, that’s really just the same lesson as the other, actually!

Posted by .

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

I was playing the highland bagpipes more or less in the womb — my mother didn’t object; or if she did, I didn’t hear her — and apart from the music of Davy Graham, Bob Dylan, Burt Jansch and John Renbourne, it was the only stuff I really liked. I used to go to the folk clubs — there was one every day of the week then — for a sing-song and to play my guitar, and even Stephan Grossman asked one night if he might play a tune. Heady days. I thought I had found my forté; but one evening Finbar Furey was booked at one of the clubs, and when I heard his pipes it was like having a treasure chest opened. Irish music is like Scottish music with its corsets off.

Posted by .

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

I have no idea.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

Walked into a bar where a session was playing. I knew I had found something special. I was already playing Americana/folk and had learned a few Irish melodies but nothing could have prepared me for the real stuff.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

An older colleague introduced me. It was a gradual process (still is, I guess). I listened for some years before I dared try to play it.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

I grew up hearing my Dad play and sing American folk music. In my teens I played rock and thrash, and my path went from The Pogues to The Dubliners to The Chieftains. One day as I was looking online for a fiddle teacher, I came across this site. It sounded like people were having so much fun. When I couldn’t locate an old-time fiddle teacher in my area, but found an Irish style instructor, I thought “that’s close enough” and signed up. I’ve been hooked on the real stuff ever since.

I like to play the intro to “Purple Haze” on my fiddle, then start vamping on an E-B double stop, and sing in my best Jimi Hendrix voice “MARTIN HAYES, ALL IN MY BRAIN… LATELY THINGS JUST DON’T SEEM THE SAME…”

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

I have no idea, but I’m still looking for the exit.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

How come no-one has mentioned the MAIN reason men/boys do anything? Because my girlfriend liked it. She took me to a Planxty concert, and that’s where I found my diddly-diddly.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

Wow, so many great stories here. I honestly don’t know how I started liking it. I primarily listened to rock/metal. Iron Maiden, Tool, Rush, guys like that. I actually bought the mandolin before I knew much irish music. I started off listening to the Chieftains and actually enjoyed it. It was something new and interesting. When I got an album of trad irish music played on mandolin/bouzouki (Marla Fibish and Jimmy Crowly’s The Morning Star) I really loved the sound. I don’t know too many tunes right now, but, I’m trying to learn them by ear.
It really is nothing like metal or other music, though, and for that I am thankful. I love how irish music has that beat to it and you can almost dance to it when playing. The other day while playing at a party, I found myself tapping my foot on my mandolin case.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

My girlfriend actually requests tunes for me to play, lol. I gave her a list of tunes and she picked a few she liked. I’ve yet to learn all of those, but, will some day.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

When my sister was in secondary school she had to play a musical instrument. She was and still is tone deaf. My folks loved the piano box so this is what was bought for my sister. She hated it. 3 years of learning it and all she could play was jingle bells. Badly.

My folks were stuck for cash so they decided to sell the accordion. I told them I could play it and of course they laughed and said I’d play it like my sister did. Nonetheless, I picked it up and within half an hour or so I was playing the Irish National Anthem. I found out very quickly that I had a knack for learning music by ear. That was 26 years ago and I still play by ear. (It’s much easier than all this quaver and semi quaver and other complicated stuff I hear people talk about)

Posted by .

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

Nice. My Mom was going to get rid of her old clarinet recently and i told her I would take it. Don’t play it frequently, but, I can if I want to.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

How do I get out of it?

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

How do you get out of it David? There are lots of ways;
1) Ask your session to release you during the summer transfer window to another country’s folk music scene - I hear Basque music in the north of Spain is nice?
2) Fill out form 22567 (stroke) C5 with the CCE and donate your flutes to the local kids. Regional fees will apply of course
3) Allow your session to turn into an "open jam" where anybody with a noise maker can come and participate - djembes welcome!
4) Join an Irish Country and Western band

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

I’m a refugee from a classical system that seemed to demand strict adherence to others interpretations of what was written on and around a musical stave. No room for my ideas. But I do remember the wonderful satisfaction of teaching myself to play tunes on my recorder as a young child, and pestering my parents to let me learn the flute after seeing an orchestra on tv. Somehow I ended up studying performance oboe after leaving school. Even played in our country’s part-time Air Force Band for three years. Ended up really disliking classical music and giving up playing for about 17 years. Spent that time listening primarily to singer-songwriters like Joni Mitchell and Neil Young etc but also encountered Altan by borrowing cds from my local library. I got back into playing through my children, who learned Irish music at their school from an awesome woman from Donegal, and she invited me to join their band, breaking my playing drought. That was about 10 years ago.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

That’s awesome. I’ve noticed some things about classical music from my sister, and I’m glad I’m playing traditional irish music. Sheet music seems a bit too constricting for me. Rhythem is nice in a tune and I really like Irish music because of that.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

Hiding under a raised platform at a local Feis Ceol with a gang of lads looking up through the cracks in the boards at the dancer’s knickers. I suppose the music that the fiddler was playing for the dancers interested me more than their knickers. Well, I was only about eight at the time.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

I started on the mouth harp playing Blues, my girlfriend didn’t like to hear that type of music all the time and prefered something more vivid and suggested I should like into Irish music or Balkan music. Then I remember Brendan Power playing some Irish tunes and overall just good memories of StPatricks day (it is also celebrated in the Netherlands) and I went with the Irish music.

Posted by .

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

It’s kind of a long story, but the short version is this: I was a flute player, a friend of mine made simple-system flutes out of ceramic (excellent instruments), another friend of mine turned me on to the Bothy Band, the radio show The Thistle & Shamrock aired every week on my local Public Radio station, another friend of mine introduced me to the California Traditional Music Society, and a local guitar shop/concert venue (McCabe’s) was booking most of the bands I was hearing on the T & S. All of this was happening at roughly the same time (1983). Seems like destiny, doesn’t it?

Posted by .

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

Climbed a mountain, found a burning bush, met several fellows surrounded by a bright white glow in tents, and a voice spoke to me……

Sorry wrong movie….

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

McCabes is a great music shop! Haven’t been there for a few years. Reminds me of Elderly Instruments in East Landing.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

Whenever I heard it I liked it, but being a clarinet player I never
thought about playing it. Years later I started playing tin whistle
a little, and then fiddle after hearing a Gerry O’Connor concert at
a festival. I’ve also gone through a flute phase and now I’m learning
concertina (in addition to my on-going war with the fiddle).

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

That’s funny, I was playing Fear of the Dark on banjo today.

Posted by .

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

I was in the Lounge Bar in Lerwick, in 1988.
I heard Stuart Pottinger play a blistering set on the banjo and thought ‘That’s for me!’

I bought a really crappy tenor banjo with my next student loan and have been playing Irish, and Scottish and Shetland (I’m not too fussy) tunes ever since.
I’ve upgraded the instrument, but still playing the old tunes.

Jim

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

I was jumped one dark night down near the docks by a pipes player and two banjo players, drugged, taken to a remote location, and forced to listen to "The Butterfly" 18 hours a day until the Stockholm syndrome set in.

At least, that’s my recollection. It’s a little foggy.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

Lol, that’s a story to tell the grandkids for sure.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

The one about the girlfriend, haha. I played guitar (kind of), and she played fiddle. Since then, I’ve picked up the tenor banjo and whistles as my primary instruments.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

My wife and I were walking after dinner one night and she said "You’ll be retiring soon, you should have a hobby." I looked up and saw a flyer from the Folk School of St Louis offering Old Time Fiddle lessons. I had played for a year in my teens (30 years earlier), still had a fiddle, and thought I’d give it a try. Once I followed the influences of Old Time and found Irish trad, I was hooked, line and sinker. It’s been a great 10 years and I’ve met some wonderful people.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

"You’re getting old, you need a hobby" that’s great :D

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

My girlfriend is a fiddler, and to prepare for her trip to Ireland a few years back started attending a local session. I went with her a few times and fell in love with it. So now we’re learning together. Gives us something fun to do together, and it’ll get me ready for the two of us to take that trip together some day!

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

Love these stories! The Chieftains and Altan were the gateway that got me into the harder stuff ala the local session. I listened for 25 years until I realized that maybe I could play along. Picked up a mandolin and haven’t put it down for 4 years. Reckon I’ll play this music until I’m either drooling on myself or dead.

The more I play these tunes, the more I love them ~ even the ones that are so hard I pretty near weep trying to play that one phrase right.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

My Mrs and I were living in a van, about to set off on our world travels. One day my guitar teacher turned up with fantastic music blaring out of his Ford Capri. "Who’s that?", I asked. "The Chieftans", he replied….

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

I was dragged kickin’ and screamin’ by my mother to music lessons like most Irish kids. I’ll never forgive her. Never.
She wants Amazing Grace on her way to the Great Beyond. She’s getting Rock N Roll by Led Zeppelin. And I’ve told her so.
But I must say you meet a really decent group of people.
Misery really does like company.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

This is kind of cheating, because I’m just reposting something I wrote from a similar thread 6 months ago, but I’m late for work already… If you search the forums, you’ll find that there are numerous threads like this. It can be interesting to go back to the early days of the session, and see how the interaction between people on this site has changed over the last 12 years…

I didn’t come to this music through anything other than marriage. Much to my chagrin, none of my near ancestors are Irish, which makes it much more difficult to move to Ireland when you’re from the U.S.

My grandfather actually played banjo, mostly Americana type stuff (Stephen Foster, etc). And I really didn’t like it at all. I spent a large portion of my early life as a nightclub DJ, playing goth, industrial, electro, etc., and I owned a couple of nightclubs. I pretty much rebelled against the musical tastes of my family.

When I married a step dancer, I was introduced to Irish music, and it wasn’t my kind of thing, but I did find some of it to be interesting. It has twisty, catchy melodies that are often played fast, and I found some of the same joy that I found in the other dance music styles that I was into. Good energy, a bit of underlying anger, and toe tapping rhythms. I had played guitar for many years, and decided to try to learn to accompany the Irish tunes that my wife was learning on fiddle. My first Irish teacher suggested that I learn to pick a couple of tunes on the guitar, so that I would know them well enough to figure out accompaniment. But flat picking tunes immediately became more interesting to me than accompaniment. From guitar, I switched to bouzouki so I could do both reasonably.

But it wasn’t until I saw Dave Cory playing banjo in a session that I realized exactly how cool banjo could be. And the first festival I went to was a week of classes from John Carty. So the slippery slope down to the banjo was complete.

I now play semi professionally, teach, and travel quite a bit. I spend as much time in Ireland as I can, and have made some wonderful friends through the music. And all that other music I used to listen to (and make my living off of)? I can’t be bothered to listen to it anymore.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

I was born and raised in a townland where music and dance, song and poetry are powerful threads that bind us to the land, to our forefathers and our descendants. They tell us who we are and where we come from. They help lessen our sorrows and deepen our joys.

My parents play, several of my grandparents played, so too my great grandparents, and perhaps beyond. How did I get into traditional Irish music? I could do no other.

Posted .

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

Played classical flute professionally for a few decades, but it just wasn’t doing it for me. Put the flute away for a few years and contemplated selling it. One day, on a whim, Googled "Irish session" and found a slow session in my city. Slunk in with my silver flute, listened, and was smitten. Took to it like a duck to water. Five years and a thousand tunes later and the feeling’s still there — and I love the flute more than ever (though it’s taken a backseat to the pipes).

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

When I was 15 (in 1975) I asked for a guitar. and my Mom said yes.
She bought me a guitar, and signed me up for some lessons
from a guy who was recommended
by the music store. I don’t remember his name but I’m very thankful for his lessons to this day.
The first thing he taught me was the tune Devil’s Dream.
The second tune he taught me was Yesterday.
I’m still working on both tunes.

Along the way, around 1980 or so, I met a guy who showed me that you could tune a guitar differently.
He called it DADGAD as if it was a word.
He showed me how to play "Witch of the West-Mer-Land" by Archie Fisher
and "Mary Ellen Carter" by Stan Rogers.

(In the meanwhile I was nagging other guitar players to teach me
riffs by George Harrison, Jimmy Page, and other rock gods of the era.)

No internet back then to chart a tune out. You either sat at the turntable
with a notebook and pen, or you haunted other musicians who already knew a
way to play a particular riff.

Somewhere along the line I started accumulating tunes, like "Irish Washerwoman", just because I liked them.
I don’t even know where I heard that tune first. I just wanted to play it, so I played whatever I thought it was,
and that made me happy.

Then along came bluegrass, and flatpicking. Tunes piled up. very few were Irish but many had
an AA BB structure.

One day I was in a pub with some bluegrassers and heard some new
people playing away in the corner. I was told, "That is an
Irish session". I offered to join in with my guitar, since I knew tunes like
"St. Anne’s Reel". I did not notice the reactions of the players.
I just played along and I had a grand time.
I thought that many of the tunes sounded like tunes I already know.

At the end of the night, a kind musician tried to explain to me that there are profound differences
between bluegrass music and Irish music that I needed to understand.
He pointed me in a useful direction, with the stern admonition to
"learn the tunes" before you play them in a session.
That was good advice.

That was about 15 years ago. Some 15 year-olds today play Irish music way better than I’ll ever play it.
I’m still trying to learn how to play it.
I think I’m halfway there.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

I did my undergraduate degree at an all-female university, so it seemed like a good way to meet blokes.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

… I’m a bit confused at that statement, Doctor Silverspear :P

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

Blokes = men

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

Ah

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

Believe it or not, but The Pogues made me want to learn Irish music (primarily the instrumental parts). One Chieftains record later, I got interested in the Irish language. One Davy Spillane record later (I actually got two albums from his catalogue), there was no way out.

http://grooveshark.com/#!/search/song?q=Davy+Spillane+One+Day+in+June

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

Back in the mists of time there was virtually no folk music on the BBC. Occasionally you might see The Countrymen ( a sort of Kingston Trio-type British rip-off ) on Top of the Pops, or something like that. But I went searching for it into the folk clubs of the time, where people used to talk during the songs and if you were stood at the back you could barely hear anything, not even a great projector like Alex Campbell. But I persevered, and tried to learn stuff like Martin Carthy and Dave Swarbrick were playing, including the tunes. And at one of these sort of gatherings I met a young woman fiddler who was like a Dubliners groupie, and THAT’S when the rot set in……………..

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

Being an American, living in a desert (no, really, surrounded by sand dunes, with coyotes and roadrunners a common sight) with no Irish music around, my first exposure to Irish music was a Sunday morning TV show they used to have back in the 1970s which featured a different music group each week. The groups would come into the studio and perform for the entire show.

It was my first exposure to brass ensemble music, when The Canadian Brass appeared.

One show was Bach organ music, E Power Biggs as I recall (I supposed they had to go on location to film that, at some church).

And one show, in the early 1970s, featured a strange ensemble that I didn’t know what to make of. Well, they were like some of the Baroque ensembles which had appeared on the show, with two violins, a wooden flute, and harpsichord.

But also there was a guy playing some sort of early drum. I had seen Renaissance percussion before, and this was not entirely unlike it.

Strangest of all was a guy playing a strange woodwind instrument that I couldn’t figure out, until I realised that it was a sort of a bagpipe.

The group, of course, was The Chieftans, and I was hooked on Irish music forever.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

Went to a Bothy Band gig.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

I started the tin whistle at the age of 6. My Grand father bought me a fiddle for my Communion. He was a member of the Millstreet Pipe Band in County Cork. I have a great love for music. I have participated in music sessions in pubs in Glasgow and Cork, Scor na nOg, performed on Stage with Jackie Daly and Matt Cranitch. I throughly enjoy Sharon Shannon and Liam O connors Music. Liam O Connor is from Newmarket which is approximately 20 minutes from me. Hi sister Noreen taught me Music upuntil the age of 18. I also learnt music in school and studied music for my Leaving Cert. I really enjoyed the practically and the group that we formed. The tunes were Amazing and the group clicked immediately.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

Visited Ireland in 1986, west Clare in particular. Back then, sessions in Doolin were the real deal. Sat in McGann’s transfixed by the flute player in particular. So I bought a "whistle tourist packet" which included a little tunebook and a cassette. I drove the family crazy for six months or so before buying a Pakistani flute (ignorance is bliss!), which stood me in out-of-tune stead until I could get my hands on a proper instrument. Still struggling, but enjoying it all.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

not too long ago, I got my hands on a propper mandolin:) Amazed how different the sound is. Getting a better instrument is always great:) lots of awesome stories here.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

I also made the transition from metal music to trad. Iron Maiden for one, but modern folk metal bands like Eluveitie are heavily inspired by folk music and incorporate pipes, whistles, hurdy gurdy and fiddle into their music. Many bands also use trad instruments, such as Nightwish (see the islander, last of the wilds). These bands inspired me to play the whistle and pipes and opened my eyes to the wonderful world of trad:)

Musical Symbols in Irish traditional music.

I’ve downloaded sheet music (PDF) from the Paddy O’Brien’s website. Under some single notes there is what appears to be a ‘slur or a ‘Tie’ which understand when joining notes but under a single note has me confused.

POB has quite a bit of ornamentation when playing and I was thinking do it indicate a tripplet desending?

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

I was in a writer’s workshop in the Boston area, and drove up there once a month on Sunday afternoon. A radio program, The Celtic Sojourn, was on WGBH at that time, hosted by Brian O’Donovan (it is still on, but late on Saturday afternoon instead of Sunday). I started to enjoy the music more and more. Went to a Battlefield Band concert. Then a Solas concert. Then a session. Then brought my guitar to a session. Learned tin whistle. Etc, etc, etc…
(Oh, and I still write in my spare time. Although I write far more than I sell…)

Musical Symbols in Irish traditional music.

Where should I post my query on this website to receive the courtesy of a responce ♫"Answer me O Lord above"♫

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

In the mid 80’s, my wife and I had been playing various Traditional Irish tunes (and a few Scots as well)for years at home for our own enjoyment. About that time the local college radio station started a "Celtic show’ which introduced us to a more artists in the genre. We were at a local highland games in the state and listening to some of the featured performers when several of our friends and family asked why we were’nt up there since everything we did was as good or better. After some time spent organizing into set lists and rearranging music we started out at a local bar free gratis once a month. Shortly after we found some other musicians with similar interests and the core group expanded to four. After a bit of that we sought out other pub owners and insisted on pay. Our following followed and voila there we were there. This went on for about 15 years as the house band for two different venues, one a pub and one a restaurant. Members came and members went, but the core of four stayed the same until 2005 when one of the fiddlers went blind. His anxiety being in public increased to the point he couldn’t play in public and by 2006 had retired. For one more year we went at it as a three piece until occupation changes dropped us to two. We continued that for a few months, but the changing economy and changing attitudes of pub owners (open mic nights) led us to hang it up in 2008. Now we’re back to playing for our own enjoyment, a little recording and occasional ceilidhs for friends and family.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

Ó Riaḃaiġ - you’ve managed somehow to post a new topic on an old thread. Try going to the Discussions page and clicking on the ‘+ add a discussion’ button. It will then start as a new thread.

Musical Symbols in Irish traditional music.

" …you need to post it as a new discussion, not in the middle of someone else’s discussion".

My sincere apologies for the intrusion the cardinal sin was caused by the mention of the ability to read sheet music somewhere above.

The ironic part in my quest for knowledge was that Paddy O’Brien could not answer my query either!?

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

Ó Riaḃaiġ, without sight of the notation in question it’s impossible to be sure but the chances are it signifies a roll. Now what sort of roll is of course another subject entirely.

Posted .

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

My first taste of trad was hearing "The Swallowtail Jig" a few years ago on St.Patrick’s day. Intrigued, I picked it out on guitar, but lost interest after that. It wasn’t until a few years later that I stumbled across a trad playlist on Spotify, and then I was hooked. I received a tin whistle for my birthday, and the rest is history.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

Walked past a pub in Sligo. Heard Stockton’s Wing playing (of course, didn’t know that at the time). Went in. Hooked.

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

I just grew up hearing it, loving it and taking it for granted.

Posted by .

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

in the late 60’s I was playing country blues and early Dylan songs - most of the local finger- in -the -ear- and sea- shanty folk scene didn’t appeal to me until I saw Martin Carthy and Dave Swarbrick at a local club, and a good part of their act consisted of jigs and reels! Soon after that I heard Robin Morton and Cathal McConnell on the radio [must have been shortly b4 Boys of the Lough] playing more of the same, this time on flute and bodhran. I bought a mandolin and made myself a bodhran out of a garden sieve and an old bass drum skin and its been a 50 year journey of discovery ever since…………….

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

I always wanted to. I had the feeling that irish fiddle had to be cross-tuned though - and the couple songbooks I got weren’t the type of tunes I was hoping for. So I let it be until a friend started introducing her tunes

Re: How did you get into traditional irish music?

Hearing Liam O’Flynn’s solo piping recordings with Planxty hooked me.

Posted by .