Free PDF Tunebooks

Free PDF Tunebooks

On my forum (The Gathering - http://www.nigelgatherer.com/forum/ ) I have a ‘Tune of the Week’ feature involving a nominated tune which people play and discuss. It’s building into an interesting collection of tunes (we’re at No.79 just now), and I have compiled the fourth lot of 20 tunes into a PDF-format book, available free of charge (most of the tunes are Scottish, I’m afraid). Also available are MP3 albums of me playing the tunes on mandolin (links below), as well as the three previous tunebooks in the series. I hope that some people will get enjoyment from the music.

Nigel Gatherer’s Tune of the Week Books (Standard Notation and Chords):
Book 1: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/1189785/Tunes/TOW/TOW_Book_1.pdf
Book 2: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/1189785/Tunes/TOW/TOW_Book_2.pdf
Book 3: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/1189785/Tunes/TOW/TOW_Book_3.pdf
Book 4: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/1189785/Tunes/TOW/TOW_Book_4.pdf

Nigel Gatherer’s Tune of the Week Books (Standard Notation and Mandolin Tablature):
Book 1: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/1189785/Tunes/TOW/TOW_Book_1t.pdf
Book 2: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/1189785/Tunes/TOW/TOW_Book_2t.pdf
Book 3: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/1189785/Tunes/TOW/TOW_Book_3t.pdf
Book 4: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/1189785/Tunes/TOW/TOW_Book_4t.pdf

MP3 Albums:
Book 1: http://www.mediafire.com/download/o36jwn8y1mjp528/TOW_CD1.zip
Book 2: http://www.mediafire.com/download/s67v2y3v053cxsv/TOW_CD2.zip
Book 3: http://www.mediafire.com/download/rux2kppk8n82bw9/TOW_CD3.zip
Book 4: http://www.mediafire.com/download/eb0b6t0qugmtata/TOW_CD4.zip

Re: Free PDF Tunebooks

Nigel, what software are you using to generate those lovely pdf books?

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For the music I use Sibelius, which is horrendously expensive, but it does a lot of things I need to do well. I believe there are lots of cheap and free programs for music ‘engraving’, but I’m afraid I’m not up on any of them (a topic for another thread, perhaps?).

I construct the books in a desktop publishing program, export as PDF and that’s it.

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Would you happen to have some of these tunebooks in ABC notation and in a plain word-document or notepad? ABC is one of the only notations I can use short of learning everything by ear. I haven’t listened to much scottish music, but, I may as well take a look 🙂 can’t hurt.

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Thanks, those are very nice!

ABC or PDF?

Warning. Cans of worms.
Ear or Dots?
Session or Slowdowner?
People or Youtube?
Lesson or Workshop?
Irish or Celtic?
Fusion or Traditional?
Violin or Fiddle?
Anglo or English?
Old or New?

Happy New Year.

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Nigel, you are a gentleman of the first order, and for your efforts and offering, I bow low.

Good cheer of the season to you and yours.

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"Warning. Cans of worms.
Ear or Dots?
Session or Slowdowner?
People or Youtube?
Lesson or Workshop?
Irish or Celtic?
Fusion or Traditional?
Violin or Fiddle?
Anglo or English?
Old or New?"

Oh Goody! Let’s open a couple. This is all subjective of course, but:

1. Ear or dots. I play by ear, but I’m finally learning to read music - inside out. As a kid, I could never get the hang of all of those flags and things flying from the stems of the dots. So I gave up. ABC music however, shows the notes logically with the length of the note right after it, "A2" "(3cde" etc. This, as a very bad programmer, I can understand. Totally logical with the magic "Aha!" as I compare the text version against the notational version in the other window. If only there had been cheap ‘puters and ABC programs 50 years ago. Too late, but I am favoring the dots to keep my ear going the right direction but I can’t say I’m actually reading the notes.

2/3. Session or Slowdowner/People or Youtube. These are sort of in the same basket. The nearest sessions to where I’m at are two hours drive through the mountains, dodging Elk etc. So… session attendance is pretty infrequent, as much as I’d like to go. That leaves the internet and wherever you can find your desired tune as an mp3 or a YouTube video. At least you get to hear real people playing the tune, sometimes in all it’s background noise glory because it was done on a smartphone, but at least you can get an idea of the tune. So, when you’ve found the tune and downloaded it (and if you’re using FireFox as your browser, there are several add-ons to download the video as an mp4), now you want to slow it down a bit of even change key. There are at least two ways to do this. Apple’s QuickTime Pro/QuickTime Player 7 is a good combo if you’ve purchased QuickTime Pro. You can slow down either mp3 audio and mp4 video as well as change pitch. Coarse adjustments and a choppy performance. Kind of like comparing ABC music to the real thing. Slowdowner is very smooth and has amazing pitch graduations. Why tune the 66 strings of the hammered dulcimer when you can just exercise, well, not the tuner but the privilege of procrastinating on tuning the silly thing by just shifting the pitch slightly? Sessions tend to be once per week, that computer is just so available by comparison. Of course, you could drift off into a whole different realm discussing whether you’re going to use an iPad, iPod or some other nefarious device but that comes back to question 1 whereby the obvious answer is the ear.

4. I have no clue. I’ve never taken lessons where ITM is concerned but I suspect that a slow learners session is far less expensive than either a Lesson or a Workshop. More likely to be repeatable across a few weeks too.

5. Irish or Celtic. Uhh, which is a sub-set of which? If only Irish, you exclude some very fine work found in the other Celtic areas. Like Scotland. Is Cape Breton style Celtic?

6. Fusion or Traditional. Ouch, there are enough ornaments and variations to spend a lifetime just learning the traditional tunes. I’ve nothing against Fusion though and I think Michael McGoldrick’s "Aurora" release (I’m an old guy, I was about to say album…) is extremely good.

7. Violin or Fiddle. As near as I can tell, a violin is played with written music or very well memorized written music by people who read music. Fiddles are played by the unconstrained individuals that have a good ear and may or may not use written scores. I could be waaaayyyyyy wrong on that though.

8. Anglo or English. How about Saxons vs Danes?

9. Old or New. Who cares? Whatever appeals to your ear. Just don’t go to a session and offer to play "Siamsa". Been there, tried that, nearly got laughed out of the pub.

This is just way to much fun. Happy New Year Everyone!!!

Re: Free PDF Tunebooks

As an isolated Aussie (with Scots grandparents) who plays for his amusement, may I second Ailin’s comment.

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GORGEOUS Tune books!! Thanks!

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This is great stuff—a full year’s worth of material (and then some) to go through and assimilate.
A monumental effort for the good of others and the passing on of the music.
Cheers!

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thank you for the tunebooks 🙂 Hope you’re having a good new-year.

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Thank you! What a treat for the New Year … some gorgeous tunes!

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Thank you very much. This is a nice work, and a very good way to start the year, very appreciated, again thank you!

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Thank you Nigel and Happy New Year! The printer is churning away as I type this. I shall share these delights with the fellow members of our Fiddle and Accordion Club who may not otherwise alight upon them. I am a tune book addict, surrounded by ever-proliferating heaps of them. When you love tunes you want to explore them in all ways possible (and that of course includes just using your ears).

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Thank you Nigel. Happy New Year.

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Thanks for the new volume, Nigel! A digital copy will subtly convey some of your tunes into sessions here in SE Arizona.

Happy New Year!

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Thanks for all that you share, Nigel!

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Nigel, Will Ye Nocht Dreed is a sweet tune! Looking forward to checking out more of you originals.

(It’s #78 in Album 4 for any who wish to check it out.)


Cheers.

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Within a month of discovering ITM just over two years ago, I discovered Nigel’s wonderful site. I’ve been using it ever since. Truly great stuff.

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Thanks for the Tune Books. Your efforts are greatly appreciated.

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Thanks for the great resources Nigel.

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Pure dead brilliant Nigel! Lang may yer lum reek!

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Awesome! Thank you. I’ve always maintained that I can’t die until I’ve learned a suitable number of Irish tunes. Now I can extend that to include Scottish tunes and add another 20 years.

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A very special thank you for the tune books. I love the Scottish tunes, feel very connected to them. Many of the old timey, appalachian tunes have the same feel to them, must be my ancestry finding their way to my generation - (Scots-Irish and Tennessee!)
Just finished playing through the first book & am ready to print out the second. Best gift ever!

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Another very grateful fiddler! Thanks so much Nigel for the PDF books - I have spent so much money on so many books that only have one or two tunes I a) like and b) can play! Your tunes are playable, varied, simply written and easy to follow. The guitar chords are great for my long-suffering guitar-playing husband! Thank-you again, Fat Fairy

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Thank you, Nigel, for sharing these tunes!