Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

Lá ‘le Bhríd faoi shona dhaoibh!

Happy St. Brigid’s Day to one and all!

And to those in the North (ern Hemisphere), a Happy First of Spring to all those who follow the old calendar. It must be nice to be seeing the snowdrops, crocii and daffs poking their heads out.

Here in Tassie, we’re in more serious fire danger territory again; the Hobart forecast is 30˚C for today, 37˚C+ at home for me in the Central Highlands. Last year when we had our big bush fire in January, 42˚C and then in June, -8˚C it meant we had a 50˚C range of temperature. And STILL some politicians deny that our lifestyle has no effect on what is happening to our planet!

Oh well, Bríd is a patron of healing…maybe she’ll intervene. Also a patron of blacksmiths; have a Merry Blacksmith when you go out to play!

All the best

Brian x

Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

"It must be nice to be seeing the snowdrops, crocii and daffs poking their heads out." ~ briantheflute

No, not really Brian, they aren’t supposed to be up here yet, Northwest England. They aren’t the only flowers showing off time, and ours are up on the North side of this house, between it and a tall fence, constant shade, lovely though they are. Trees have been budding too. And, there’s a frost promised, and there was snow and slush falling this afternoon. However, we’re lucky as we’re relatively flood free, most of that being in the South and Southeast, the poor suffering souls. There’s a high tide and a surge promised as well as more rain.

Over in Cymru/Wales they’ve made all the students in Aberystwyth, with residences on the Promenade abandon their digs and move elsewhere, away from that threat from the sea. Classes have been cancelled too, some of which are held in one of the university’s properties on that same front. Britain has had the wettest January since records were kept, more than 100 years now.

In North America there’s waves of freeze hitting, with severe wind chill. Funny, I’d expected that would be here, what with the Atlantic current slowing down and our being directly across from Labrador, weather I’m familiar with…

And yet there are still naysayers about global warming…

But, we can always call on our saints or gods to rescue us, eh? I wonder how long it will take till we start building pyramids and making live sacrifices? 😛 😀

Bless you Brian, and may Bríd heal us of all our wounds.

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She’s also the goddess of poetry and music, if memory serves me right. I don’t follow the old ways, but have respect and an interest in the old holidays.
Nicely enough, Spring (march, rather) marks a year of playing the mandolin and becoming a musician. Thanks, Brigid.

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Do you guys in England and Australia have politicians who doubt global warming too? I thought it was just us redneck Yanks!

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According to Germaine Greer’s book The White Beech, the ‘bush’ fires are actually meadow-grass fires, the result of planting thousands of acres of exotic grasses in order to feed exotic livestock. I read Rachel Carson’s ‘Silent Spring’ when it came out — nothing has changed really, except maybe to get worse. It’s quite interesting, in a sad sort of way, to see the birds courting and looking for nest materials in the torrential rain. Happy springtime indeed!

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Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

It may be Spring here but it’s not Spring here. Winds topping 100 MPH, snow in the midlands, 30 foot waves off the coast. But… Happy St. Bridgid’s Day.

Gale Warning

Southwest gales or strong gales today, on all Irish coastal waters and on the Irish Sea. Winds will reach storm force on coasts from Hook Head to Valentia to Erris Head, later veering westerly.
Issued at 05:00 on 1-Feb-2014

Imbolc greetings…

Today is Imbolc. Eighth of the year after Yule (Solstice).
The Christians dreamt up St Bridget’s day to replace the existing festival (as indeed they did with Yule as well of course).
And Gong Hey Fat Choi whilst we’ve about it!

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"Today is Imbolc. Eighth of the year after Yule (Solstice)."

Actually, if you are going by the neo-pagan wheel system, it isn’t. It’s tomorrow.

http://paganfed.org/pagan-wheel.shtml

The Julian calendar, I think, would make today January 19th.

Then there is jig time, reel time etc….

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Dr Niemitz’s work on the subject really raises some interesting (to me, at least 🙂 ) points regarding the aforementioned dark ages, and by extension, the reliability of historical assertions in general. They say that history is written by the victor; but sometimes it is just made up.
It’s bad enough trying to figure out what life was like even a hundred years ago without this sort of pitfall lurking under the topsoil.
http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/volatile/Niemitz-1997.pdf

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Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

I’ll be celebrating that tomorrow since it’s on the 2nd not the 1st of Feb. Regardless, Brigid was also the goddess (before she got demoted to St.) of blacksmithing too; which is where my interest lay.

It’s interesting to note the differences between Europe and here. Since Brigid’s day is also supposed to mark the lactation of the ewes and lambing, but that won’t be happening here in Eastern NY/Western New England for about another month (same with crocuses, daffodils and the like popping up). It’s certainly not the first day spring here.

Gong Hey Fat Choi! ~ & bless the blacksmiths while we’re at it…

I’m all for celebrating again tomorrow, thanks Weejie, and I’m up for jig, reel or any other dance time too, and I’m loving the linked to distractions. 😀

Anyone considered Velikovsky lately? I read something recently about the prospects for the poles doing a flip. 😉

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I’ve got confused here. I’ve just Googled a fair bit, and almost everywhere lists Imbolc and St Brigid’s Day as 1 February, with just that one site giving it as 2 February. Is there a right one? Does it really have something to do with the Julian calendar? If it does, surely the day would be a different date each year in the Gregorian calendar?

???

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Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

Check out Imbolc and Candlemas.

This too:

http://paganspoonie.blogspot.co.uk/p/wheel-of-year-20122013.html

And this:

http://paganbydesign.blogspot.co.uk/p/pagan-calendar_03.html

And this:

http://www.examiner.com/article/the-history-of-imbolc-candlemas-st-brigid-and-groundhog-day

"Does it really have something to do with the Julian calendar?"

Not really, but if St Brigid’s Day is as old as some say it is, it would predate the Gregorian Calendar.

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Ah. This seems to have at least something to say about the difference in the dates:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imbolc

In the Christian calendar, it is clearly on 1 February. Also, apparently, (there were many links other than Wiki) it’s commonly held on 1 February even when it’s Imbolc rather than St Brigid’s Day.

And yes, it does seem to be old right enough.

I think I’ll just accept that some people think it’s on 1 Feb and some think it’s on 2 Feb. Oh, and some think it’s on both. Mustn’t forget that one. 🙂

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Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

Let’s hope that St. Brigid’s Day is today, February 1. February 2 is Groundhog Day here in the USA. We wouldn’t want our fair St. Brigid sharing her day with the groundhog, would we?

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Hi! Just off to the Wigdom to see Hungry Grass, Rosie’s birthday (Gregorian), do a tune for Bridget then!!!!

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Why not celebrate the whole week… 😎 ~ and barbecue the groundhogs…

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"In the Christian calendar, it is clearly on 1 February. "

Not really. Imbolc is not a Christian thing. If it’s a pagan thing, then you can also look at Wiki:

"Also in European tradition it is between February 2 and March 9 (between Imbolc and Ostara) that the traditional carnivals are held which has it roots in pre-Christian customs."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheel_of_the_Year

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Wheel_of_the_Year.svg

So, it’s either just over or just beginning as I write this.

Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

Thank you for the Brigid’s Day greeting. Here in the states, it’s the Bean dance at Hopi in Northern Arizona and the end of the Winter ceremonies in the Pacific Northwest. The egg is warming and growing.

Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

"Not really. Imbolc is not a Christian thing."

No, but St Brigid’s Day is a Christian thing. As well as a Pagan thing. And, elsewhere, Wiki firmly says that Imbolc is on 1 February. Hence the confusion. There clearly is some, and it ain’t just me.

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Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

If the Pagan/pagan thing is related to the solstices and equinoxes then it may shift between 1st and 2nd depending on where we are in relation to a leap year.

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Yes, I had thought that, but nowhere seems to suggest that. They either say that it’s on 1 February, or they say that it’s on 2 February, or some of them say it’s on both. Nowhere says it varies. Well, nowhere that I can find.

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Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

Oh. I’d seen that one, David. Because of some others that were more specific about what they meant, I’d taken that one to be saying the same as some others that say that it’s on BOTH the 1st and the 2nd. I didn’t take it as meaning that it might move. But maybe I’m reading it wrong …

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Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

We are taking the little electric lights out of the tree in our garden today. The timing of this is determined by the heavens - it’s stopped raining, for now.

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For some reason that brought back to mind that lovely little rhyme:

The rain it raineth every day
Upon the just and unjust fella
But more upon the just because
The unjust’s got the just’s umbrella

… but I digress …

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Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

"No, but St Brigid’s Day is a Christian thing. As well as a Pagan thing. And, elsewhere, Wiki firmly says that Imbolc is on 1 February. Hence the confusion. There clearly is some, and it ain’t just me."

I think the problem is that you are confusing the relationship between Imbolc and St Brigid’s Day.
Quite a few pagan feast days were "taken over" by Christian feast days. There are two Christian days here, St Brigid’s Day and Candlemas. Imbolc went into demise, and its neo-pagan revival has kind of reversed the trend by "replacing" a Christian feast day. It seems that they weren’t quite sure which one they were replacing.
The Christian and pagan days are not really linked other than one wanting to obscure the other.

Candlemas:

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/03245b.htm

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"If the Pagan/pagan thing is related to the solstices and equinoxes then it may shift between 1st and 2nd depending on where we are in relation to a leap year."

It does not follow, as this concerns a day before the end of February.

Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

Happy Candlemas - and to be a bit previous, Happy St Valentine’s Day, and Happy Feast of Lupercal too….
In fact, just be happy altogether…

Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

"I think the problem is that you are confusing the relationship between Imbolc and St Brigid’s Day."

No. You’re wrong there. No confusion on my part regarding that. I was referring to the subject of the thread. I’m also interested in the subject of Imbolc, surrounding which there seems to be uncertainty about the date(s). There also is, clearly, a relationship between St Brigid (conflated in the Middle Ages with the pre-Christian Goddess of the same name) and Imbolc.

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"I was referring to the subject of the thread. "

And my post concerning the date was concerned specifically with Imbolc.

"There also is, clearly, a relationship between St Brigid (conflated in the Middle Ages with the pre-Christian Goddess of the same name) and Imbolc."

Some people have suggested this, but there is no concrete evidence. It’s less clear even that the date of Imbolc.

A big problem is all the dressing up both by Christians and neo-pagans.

I wonder what the people of Cwm Gwaun have to say about it all?….

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I must admit, I’ve enjoyed looking all of this up. I like uncertainties. Especially when they have such a fascinating historical basis. 🙂

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"It does not follow, as this concerns a day before the end of February." The page linked above said: "Imbolc is a cross-quarter day, midway between the winter solstice (Yule) and the spring equinox (Ostara). " So taken literally that would be *after* the 2nd of February.

Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

"The page linked above said: "Imbolc is a cross-quarter day, midway between the winter solstice (Yule) and the spring equinox (Ostara). " So taken literally that would be *after* the 2nd of February."

I don’t think "2nd of February" would have much significance when it comes to the relationship between the sun and the earth. It would result in a much more "moveable feast" than a single day. Besides, they pagans weren’t all that aware of what orbited what.

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The dates of the equinoxes and solstices don’t vary all that much, basically because our dates do have a direct relationship with the relationship between the sun and the earth. That’s why we have leap years. We align our dates with the solar year. More or less.

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Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

Maybe I should clarify. The reference to the leap year was nothing to do with the end of February, it was because because the time and day of the solstice shifts each year then is (almost) reset on each leap year. So if the Imbolc was so many days after the winter solstice is would vary back and forwards by a day depending on when the last leap year was.

It does not matter what orbits what.

(crossing with Ben)

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"So if the Imbolc was so many days after the winter solstice is would vary back and forwards by a day depending on when the last leap year was. "

You are forgetting that this is supposed to relate to that mystical prehistoric time. There is that subject of "axial precession". Relating the (relatively) modern calendar, and days measured strictly by hours, not taking into account the gradual shift, would be at odds with one another.
That is something neo-paganism is very wishy-washy about.

"It does not matter what orbits what"

It does if you want to make any sense out of it.

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No, I don’t think so. You don’t have to know what orbits what to be able to detect and measure events in the solar - and indeed, on another subject, the lunar - calendar. The ancients, in many different cultures, were very in tune with the solar calendar*, but I’m not sure if we have any clue as to whether they knew anything about what orbited what and how. Us moderns need to know such things. I’m not sure that the ancients needed to.

* Stonehenge is but one of many different pieces of evidence to attest to this.

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Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

No Weejie. You are reflecting the arrogance of modern humans who forget that our knowledge of how the calendar works does not stem from knowing what orbits what. It’s the other way round - we worked out what orbits what by knowledge of how the calendar works.

The calendar is awkward mainly because the the year is not an exact multiple of the day. The ancients noticed that. Hours don’t come into it.

Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

You cross-posted again, David. 🙂

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Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

" The ancients noticed that."

There are theories that the "ancients" noticed that. Like a theory that "Brigid" was connected to this particular time of year before Christianity.

"we worked out what orbits what by knowledge of how the calendar works."

It took a wee bit more than that to work out axial shift.
OK, there are more theories that the "ancients" were calculating axial shift.

However, if these "ancients" had been using the Gregorian calendar, the solstice would not be on the date it is today. That is the point I’m making. February is irrelevant. It wasn’t there.
Of course, it’s all mashed up due to neo-pagans trying to convince themselves that they are in touch with their ancient past, while observing relatively modern trappings.
Some don’t, I’ll grant you.

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February is relevant because it’s part of the calendar that most of the world uses to be sure they are talking about the same day. Without it we would need, in this discussion, to have been doing something like counting the days since the last solstice.

We might have to count back to the last readily observed solar refercence point when we saw the sun. If we had to count a long way back we might grouping the days and giving those groups a name. Or maybe we could delegate the counting to someone, or build a henge to make it easier to use the days when the sun did shine.

Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

"February is relevant because it’s part of the calendar that most of the world uses to be sure they are talking about the same day. Without it we would need, in this discussion, to have been doing something like counting the days since the last solstice."

February is irrelevant if you are trying to say that this "Imbolc" thing has anything to do with an ancient "feast day". I don’t believe it has anything to do with it. It’s mostly some relatively modern notion that uses a system that didn’t exist at the time this feast day was supposed to have originated.
Either you follow natural phenomena or a fixed calendar. The two conflict with each other.
It’s down to whether you take this neo-pagan thing seriously or treat it as a load of imbolcs.
Placing "Imbolc" to a date on the Gregorian calendar (which can’t even be agreed on), is bound to result in conflict. Besides, it hasn’t been established that the discrepancy has anything to do with leap years. If this was the case, I’d expect there to be some reference as to which years were the 1st and which were the 2nd. My own theory is that it has to do with the difference between St Brigid’s Day and Candlemas, and neo-pagans trying to merge their image of the "old" with their own conditioning within their Christian upbringing or surroundings. Just like Christianity used the past to introduce their new doctrine.

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"Either you follow natural phenomena or a fixed calendar. The two conflict with each other."

No they don’t. The fixed calendar has been calibrated to coincide as nearly as possible with natural phenomena. We get conflicts, as with the moveable date of Easter, when we try to match things in the solar cycle with things in the lunar cycle. Follow a solar calendar, and that is what our modern calendar does. The two are in harmony.

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"Besides, it hasn’t been established that the discrepancy has anything to do with leap years. "

I’ll take that back partly. It’s probably more to do with axial shift. Solstice and equinox can vary over four days, so this would presumably mean that imbolc would correspond and have a four day window. As it seems to have only two, it would appear that it is an attempt to reconcile natural occurrence with a fixed calendar but not doing the job properly.

Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

@ Weejie: I think you’ve hit upon a statement about which we can (all, maybe) agree. 🙂

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Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

"No they don’t. The fixed calendar has been calibrated to coincide as nearly as possible with natural phenomena. We get conflicts, as with the moveable date of Easter, when we try to match things in the solar cycle with things in the lunar cycle. Follow a solar calendar, and that is what our modern calendar does. The two are in harmony."

They are not in harmony. They conflict. that’s why discrepancies have to be corrected.
See above post. Winter Solstice can occur from 20th Dec through to 23rd December, because the Gregorian calendar is not in harmony. This should mean that Imbolc should occur on any one of four days. It doesn’t seem to.
Add to this the 26,000 year phenomenon, and you’ll see that there is certainly conflict. I’ll grant you that the Gregorian Calendar is a compromise. It’s the equal temperament of the solar session instruments. It’s not quite in tune.

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"Weejie: I think you’ve hit upon a statement about which we can (all, maybe) agree"

I don’t think I’ll ever be in agreement with the bulk of neo-pagans.

Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

"I don’t think I’ll ever be in agreement with the bulk of neo-pagans."

Good job there don’t seem to be all that many in these here parts, then. 😉

"I’ll grant you that the Gregorian Calendar is a compromise. It’s the equal temperament of the solar session instruments. It’s not quite in tune."

Near as dammit, though. And good analogy. Though if the variations in just intervals were as complex as the universe, we’d be in trouble, I’d suggest. 😉 (Not that they aren’t complex enough as it is.)

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Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

"Near as dammit"

Not for us solar fiddlers.

"Good job there don’t seem to be all that many in these here parts, then."

There are round these parts, due to the abundance of stone circles.

Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

Just out of interest, I’ve calculated "midway between the winter solstice (Yule) and the spring equinox (Ostara)".

"Ostara" was taken to mean vernal equinox (according to some sources "Ostara", like Easter was based on the moon - Ostara being the full moon after equinox, which seems to be 15th April).
Anyway, this would place Imbolc between the 3rd and 4th of February this year.
Looks like the neo-pagans can’t even manage equal temperament.

Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

Yes that’s why I said "so taken literally that would be *after* the 2nd of February" earlier on. Has anyone mentioned this yet http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quarter_days ?

Another reason for uncertainty as to dates by one day is that it might be the eve of the particular day that was relevant, with the event running past midnight - folks turning up to church at Candlemas with a hangover maybe.

Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

Ah! Quarter Days. You’ll be talking next about the unfathomable date of the tax year end and its relationship to the change to the Gregorian calendar in the 18c. 🙂

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"Winter Solstice can occur from 20th Dec through to 23rd December, because the Gregorian calendar is not in harmony". No. It’s back to this business of the year not being an exact multiple of the day. If the Gregorian calendar was ‘not in harmony’ the solstice would drift over the years, as it did before they got the leap years sorted out. It stays in that interval because the calendar is ‘in harmony’.

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No, no. Tolkein explained the start of the tax year - it was the fall of Sauron.

Apparently the joke is hidden in all the dates he gave.

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The idea of someone in Whitehall deciding that electronic tax returns must be in before Imbolc appeals to me.

Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

🙂
It’s at times like these, David50, that one wishes there was a ‘like’ facility on this forum.

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It’s the Spring Quarter Day, David. Only the banks had to pay income tax (imagine that! 🙂 ), and they had to pay it on the Spring Quarter Day, and they said they’d lost 11 days, so they weren’t going to pay until April 5th. Hence the tax year end. I kid you not.

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Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

"No. It’s back to this business of the year not being an exact multiple of the day. If the Gregorian calendar was ‘not in harmony’ the solstice would drift over the years, as it did before they got the leap years sorted out. It stays in that interval because the calendar is ‘in harmony’."

There’s starting and finishing at roughly the same time, but being discordant at the same time. The solstice is drifting - gradually - and it’s not being adequately corrected. The calendar doesn’t take into account "axial precession", which has a minimal effect in the short term, but, over an extended period, results in a drift (we’ll never notice in day to day stuff during our lifetime - or several hundred lifetimes- , but the "ancients" were a few bars out from us). It’s like that wind player who’s drifting out of tune, but doesn’t realise it - or that slightly slippery string.
It’s not in harmony, because the intervals aren’t just.
If solstice and equinox have a four day window, then Imbolc should follow the same principle. The whole shebang would still be drifting gradually out of tune, though.

"The idea of someone in Whitehall deciding that electronic tax returns must be in before Imbolc appeals to me."

It depends too on whether the tax inspector is named Julian or Gregory.

Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

Brigid was the goddess that brought us beer, and one of the miracles attributed to Saint Brigid was turning water into beer. A miracle that is close to the heart of many of those who play music at sessions…

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The calendar is designed to keep in step, on average, with the tropical year. The system of leap years does this. Though I suppose one could ague that if a leap year needed to be missed to keep in step then it wouldn’t be the *Gregorian* calendar anymore.

The relationship between the calendar and the seasons may become a more pressing problem.

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"Though I suppose one could ague that if a leap year needed to be missed to keep in step then it wouldn’t be the *Gregorian* calendar anymore."

In the Gregorian calendar, every 100 years is not a leap year, unless it’s 1600 or every 400 years thereafter. Which is why 1900 was not a leap year, but 2000 was.

But you knew that …

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Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

"The calendar is designed to keep in step, on average, with the tropical year."

"On average" is your "equal temperament". It’s out of tune. You get used to it in time, but some don’t follow the system and recognise how it doesn’t quite get there.


"The system of leap years does this. "

You can’t really call it perfect harmony when things are slightly "out of tune " and then corrected every four years. It’s like playing out of tune for three sets and then tuning up for the fourth, then calling those first three sets "in harmony", because the fourth set averaged out the whole.

Anyway, it seems that "Imbolc" is not a direct replacement of a feast day, as it is a moveable feast by its description (though not moveable enough, if it relates to solstice and equinox), and both St Brigid’s Day and Candlemas are fixed. That pagans and Christians would want their own particular celebration(s) to oust the other’s is quite predictable.

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I once lived for a year or two with a clan of Yolgnu (Aboriginal) people outside of Ramingining, a remote spot in North Central Arnhem land (Northern Territory). The newly established arts centre in town decided to print up some tee-shirts with the word ‘Ramingining’ on them. unfortunately this almost led to clan conflict because out of those few people who had been taught to write and spell, nobody could agree how to spell ‘Ramingining’. One guy put it in perspective for me when he stopped me in the store and pointed to his totally white, blank tee-shirt and said, ‘This is how we used to spell Ramingining before you whities came here". Now, those people up there had about the same understanding of dates, day names and clock time as they had about the written language (it was irrelevant and unneeded to the clan I lived with), yet their ceremonies were all amazingly similar in celestial measurements to the ones that go on in just about all parts of the world (despite the global seasonal differences). I also recall when the white administrators were trying to train some of the younger Yolgnu to start up a local radio station, one of the aspiring announcers saying "Good morning, today is March the 25th of April!". These people seemed impressively smart to me, but yardstick points such as Monday, Tuesday, February, 1st or 2nd, etc, had little if no meaning to them. This particular festival for them, as I recall was to do with the full moon. That’s more how I live myself nowadays;- I tend to watch the environment more than the clocks and dates.

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And sorry, I did of course mean to say the ‘new’ moon and not the ‘full’ moon. I’m still half asleep. Chinese new year and all.

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Re: Happy Chinese New Year!

All 15 days of it… Now there’s folks who know how to throw a party, but then we always celebrate the ‘12’ days of Christmas, not just the one… 😎

Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

If the calendar is in synch within a day or so, which leap years will achieve, no-one without astronomical gear or a henge is going to notice a discrepancy. If it’s about sowing a crop then, as for Gobby, in any particular year the day to day weather has become more important than the calendar at that level of detail. It is not the same as going round the circle of fifths and finding that your octaves are out.

Yes I did know Ben, the wikipedia page that I was not admitting was one of my sources mentioned skipping one of the 400 year leap years to correct for the things that are bothering Weejie.

Good story related to the t-shirt Gobby 🙂

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"If the calendar is in synch within a day or so"

Or two or three or four. Moreover, it is shifting due to inaccurate calculation.
The point is that you don’t really need "astronomical gear" to notice the discrepancy when thousands of years have lapsed since these "ancient" times.

"If it’s about sowing a crop "

It’s not so much about sowing the crop, it’s more to do with who you believe is going to make that crop a bountiful one, and basing the belief on hogwash. Especially when it is new hogwash disguised as old hogwash.

"It is not the same as going round the circle of fifths and finding that your octaves are out."

It’s not the same, as it was an analogy, but there are similarities, actually.

" the things that are bothering Weejie"

What bothers me is this pseudo "ancient" clap-trap. Calculations that are inconsistent, modern myths disguised as old, dismissal of one religion to be replaced by another, of dubious origin.
It reminds me of the movie "Braveheart" where "Hamish" is up in the glens - in Wallace country, with all the mountain scenery. How it was lapped up. Of course Wallace was reckoned to come from Elderslie, about as Hieland as Shotts. Some think he was from Ellerslie, near Kilmarnock, which is even less Highland.
If people want to believe they are connecting with the ancient past, while following poorly thought out ritual, and inaccurate baloney, that was concocted in relatively modern times it’s up to them.
I’m also at liberty to point out where it falls flat.

Re: Happy St. Brigid’s Day!

Beliefs based on hogwash, and Braveheart:- two of my most irritating peeves.

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