Modern tunes vs. Trad. tunes: sheet music and sessions

Modern tunes vs. Trad. tunes: sheet music and sessions

Hello everybody. First of all, excuse me for my poor english.

I would like to know TheSession.org’s members opinion about adding new tunes. I registered on this site a couple of days ago but I’ve been an user for years. TheSession.org has been very helpful for me, allowing me to find both sheet music for tunes I wanted to learn, and the name of those I learnt in sessions.

I’ve been attending sessions for 7 years almost weekly, so I’m aware of the "rules" of a session. The problem is, there’s no "fresh blood". I live in a country with zero tradition in Irish traditional music (Spain) and it’s hard to find people interested in joining a session us and share some tunes and beer; people here uses to hear the so-called "celtic" music.

When I started playing Irish music, I grabbed some recent recordings and learnt the tunes. In time, I’ve "developed" a taste for the most traditional ones, at the point I only like to play traditional tunes at the sessions (e.g. Out On The Ocean, Kesh jig, The Musical Priest, Banish Misfortune, etc.) but I’m aware it’s pretty hard for "newbies" to get introduced into Irish traditional music without "tasting" the newest recordings. On the other hand, I’ve read another discussion where some members complained about people adding not-for-session tunes. It is not my intention to confuse the visitors of this site. In fact, this site has an useful option to view the most popular tunes — and should be used for those who want to learn tunes played worldwide.

This is why I would like to add scores and details of new tunes/author tunes. E.g.: there’s a lot of Liz Carroll’s tunes that have not been added yet and, despite they’re not traditional tunes, they resemble the traditional style and sound, and I’m sure there’s a lot of people who would like to play them if they could find the score. For all them, that would be an approach to Irish traditional music, and maybe in time, they would like to join the group of Irish trad maniacs.

What do you think? Should I try to add those traditional sounding tunes that are not added yet or should I stick to traditional/session-able tunes?

Thank you very much for your attention.

Re: Modern tunes vs. Trad. tunes: sheet music and sessions

Why not ask Jeremy? Go to the bottom of the page and click on ‘contact’.

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Re: Modern tunes vs. Trad. tunes: sheet music and sessions

If you want to transcribe a bunch of Liz Carroll tunes and enter them in the database, my vote is ‘go for it!’

Re: Modern tunes vs. Trad. tunes: sheet music and sessions

Hi José, welcome to the Session.

"Excuse me for my poor English." Ten en cuenta que la mayoría de nosotros en este foro habla un español bastante peor que tu inglés, por no hablar del catalán, gallego, y eusquera. Te entendemos bien.

I love Liz Carroll’s tunes myself, and I’ve thought about posting my own transcriptions to the site. What’s held me back is the thought that they’re probably under copyright. Maybe I’ve been too cautious; I don’t know. I’m curious to see what others say.

Re: Modern tunes vs. Trad. tunes: sheet music and sessions

I must say, I’ve noticed on YouTubes and the posts underneath that quite a lot of Spaniards - or at any rate, Spanish speakers - seem to have become enthusiasts for Irish, Scottish and related music. Good luck with it!

Re: Modern tunes vs. Trad. tunes: sheet music and sessions

The general rule of thumb if you’re trying to figure out whether to submit a tune to The Session is to ask yourself, "Would I play this tune at a session?" If the answer is yes, then go for it.

Re: Modern tunes vs. Trad. tunes: sheet music and sessions

Why not? But, it wouldn’t be a bad idea to ask ~ meaning Liz Carroll, who I suspect won’t mind you adding her tunes here. She’s not complained about the few that are already on site. But a courtesy would be to ask the composer, in this case since she’s alive and kickin’. If you are at all unsure of your ABC notation, you can always ask for help there too. And, yes, many of Liz’s tunes do get played around at sessions worldwide. I’m sure she’d be chuffed to hear they were getting air in Spain. I think most of her recordings are here in the ‘Recordings’ database, so there would be a link as well to a recorded source, something for the ears, and that is always highly recommended. Best of luck…

Re: Modern tunes vs. Trad. tunes: sheet music and sessions

For instance : "would i play this brian finnegan reel at a session" the answer is no…

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Re: Modern tunes vs. Trad. tunes: sheet music and sessions

My vote is yes. I’m sure it would be appreciated by the majority. (if not they’ll soon let you know) Good on ya JoseACerro!

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Re: Modern tunes vs. Trad. tunes: sheet music and sessions

Thank you all for your feedback!

Liz Carroll’s tunes are an example of traditional-style tunes that could be played in a session. As an example, I’ve recently submitted Before The Storm (https://thesession.org/tunes/13473) which I find cool to play in a session; but on the other hand, Remove The Rug (available in the same disk, Double Play) is a great tune as well but not really for a session.
Obviously I try to keep them in a session-able style (no arrangements). Anyway, as ceolachan commented, I’ll ask for Miss Carroll permission. After all, those tunes are intended to be played on non-profit sessions or… at your own home.

Re: Modern tunes vs. Trad. tunes: sheet music and sessions

It’s ironic, isn’t it? The earliest settlers of Ireland were originally from Northern Spain.

Re: Modern tunes vs. Trad. tunes: sheet music and sessions

How is that ironic? But is it a fact?

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Re: Modern tunes vs. Trad. tunes: sheet music and sessions

How is that ironic? But is it a fact?

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Re: Modern tunes vs. Trad. tunes: sheet music and sessions

If I may, several scholars such as Barry Cunliffe have posited that the earliest inhabitants of Ireland probably did arrive there from the Iberian peninsula in approximately 6,700 BCE, give or take a millennium. Cunliffe discusses the migrations to Britain and Ireland extensively in his work, Britain Begins as well as his other publications. He also cites recent genetic work by Stephen Oppenheimer indicating that a portion of present-day Spain’s current residents and those of Britain and Ireland have a common origin. Whether or not that common origin means that the first inhabitants of Ireland were “Iberian” in some fashion, or if the various groups descended from them simply have shared roots, is no simple matter to determine (since people of the seventh millennium BCE would not have a modern sense of national or geographic consciousness, they certainly wouldn’t have identified themselves that way or in any other political sense; it’s equally difficult to ascertain if the residents with common genetic material in present-day Spain have been there for the last nine thousand years or so). There’s an ongoing debate in the archaeological, historical, and genetic fields regarding the origins of the peoples of Britain and Ireland, and there is little, if anything, that can be unquestionably accepted as "fact." Cunliffe, Oppenheimer, and other scholars such as Simon James and John Collis appear to be well on the right track. My apologies for the deviation from the initial thread.