advice for mother of a very keen beginner

advice for mother of a very keen beginner

hi,

Can anyone advise me on an affordable very beginners flute? my daughter is 8, has been playing the whistle for a long time and is incredibly keen to move on. I am a percussionist, therefore know nothing of materials etc, should it be wood? What’s with all the nameless flutes from Pakistan? Any good? should i go for 6 or 8 holes? please, any help much appreciated…i hit things…i know nothing….

anne

Re: advice for mother of a very keen beginner

are Tipple flutes any good? Not wooden……?? Help?

Re: advice for mother of a very keen beginner

I’m no expert on the subject, but from what I’ve reading here it seems that polymer flutes such as tony dixons are good! Polymer is a kind of plastic, so I’m guessing that they don’t require as much care as wooden flutes, it seems like a good option for your little daughter.
I’m sure more knowledgeable people will comment on this too and give you their better informed opinions :)

Re: advice for mother of a very keen beginner

Martin Doyle makes fantastic two piece Blackwood flutes for 600 euro and are suitable for beginners , they have as loud a sound as any fully keyed flutes at the moment . 600 euro may seem expensive but if you start on a decent flute you are likely to Improve faster than starting on cheap plastic flutes as they have a limit to what sound you can get out of them . I’ve been playing one for the past four years !

Re: advice for mother of a very keen beginner

STAY AWAY FROM PAKISTANI FLUTES!!!

I think the best flute for the money is Casey Burns’ Folk Flute. They are high quality, low price, easy embouchure, and ergonomically friendly for a child’s hands (or smaller hands). http://caseyburnsflutes.com/ff.php

I have played one for years, and I am very glad that was the flute I started out with.

I second Martin Doyle, but I would recommend one after your child has shown dedication to the flute and wanting to stay in the music for the long run.

Re: advice for mother of a very keen beginner

Tipple flutes are good. The D flute is may be too big a hand stretch for an 8 year old girl. If it’s for something to start getting used to a flute then the Tipple G flute (I think that is his lowest one with the narrower bore tubing) might be good.

I have a Tipple G - every time I play it for any length of time my embouchure is much better when I go back to the D Casey Burns folkflute.

A smallish 10-year old boy who plays boehm flute had no trouble with my small-handed Casey Burns.

Most makers will tell you the hole spacing - you could mark it up on piece of wooded rod and see how it feels.

Re: advice for mother of a very keen beginner

Anne— email sent to you. Check your message box. Best wishes—

Re: advice for mother of a very keen beginner

I have a Casey Burns folk flute (2 piece) and am very happy with it - I find the value for money that it represents astounding. It is the flute that I leave around my desk assembled for tootling during the day and it also the flute I would take when I go camping. (Unless I was camping at a music event when I would take lots of instruments…:-))

Re: advice for mother of a very keen beginner

It might be too soon for her to play an Irish flute, as the span of your fingers has to be quite wide. So David’s advice above is good, there are flutes that are made for smaller fingers.
Best of luck. How exciting to have a wee one that loves music!

Re: advice for mother of a very keen beginner

When I started learning the Fiddle, my mother said it sounded as
if, I was killing a Cat : (

So I suppose it’s Normal : )
jim,,,

Re: advice for mother of a very keen beginner

I haven’t read many good words on the Pakistani instruments, and you will observe that nobody else has said ANYTHING about them. There are obviously several advantages to working with more local makers.
As to care; I believe that Matt Molloy said that "If you don’t want to keep your wooden flute long, don’t bother to swab it out.". So, obviously, a synthetic one might be a good starter.

Re: advice for mother of a very keen beginner

Wooden flutes are said to sound better than delrin/pvc/other polymer flutes, but they require more care in the areas of temperature, humidity, and oiling. They do get better with age, as the oils, etc. season and harden the wood further. However, my delrin flute, to be honest, doesn’t sound all that different in tone quality from the very few higher-end wooden flutes I’ve played. The difference is there, but it isn’t much. That’s just my experience though.

I don’t know how good your daughter is with taking care of things, but since I’ve had my flute, I have dropped it, tossed it, left it in a hot car, etc. and it’s made it through it all with only a few dents. No warping or any sort of distortions as far as I can tell. It still plays just as amazingly as when I got it. So if you’re worried about it breaking, definitely go for a polymer flute (delrin, pvc, etc)

All this to say, a polymer flute vs a wooden flute isn’t really an issue at this level, as long as it’s well made. My flute was made by Dave Copley. Some other good affordable polymer flute makers that have been recommended in the past are Seery, Forbes, Somers, WD Sweet.

Also, 6 vs 8 holes doesn’t matter. An 8 hole flute as 2 extra holes down at the bottom which can be used to put keys on (for a low C# and C), or just to make it more bottom-heavy. This is important if you have a metal tuning slide, as it balances it out more. If there isn’t a tuning slide, it’s unnecessary. It does look nice though…

Re: advice for mother of a very keen beginner

I’m also recommending delrin, owning two of them (a keyless Forbes and a keyed Seery). They sound great and are very easy to look after. A keyless model isn’t too expensive, and, if still in good condition down the track, should be very easy to resell when looking to upgrade.

Re: advice for mother of a very keen beginner

Thank you everyone. Much appreciated. I have decided on a shannon. Waiting on walt sweet getting back to me. Thanks again.