‘Quiet’ High D Comparison

‘Quiet’ High D Comparison

Looking for a ‘quietish’ at home, practise, don’t annoy the family or neighbours high D. I’ve read that the Walton Mellow and Dixon polymer may do the job? Can anyone compare the two for me please?

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Re: ‘Quiet’ High D Comparison

I have had a couple of Waltons whistles in D and neither played well (tuning problems, and one of them didn’t play a 2nd octave at all), although that might just have been bad luck. I got a Dixon polymer (tunable) once when I needed a whistle in an emergency, and it plays decently in tune but I am not really a fan of its tone. I got their cheap brass one too and much prefer its tone, but my favourite of all relatively inexpensive whistles that I have tried is my Jerry Freeman tweaked Generation. Volume-wise, I’d say the tweaked Generation is in the same sort of range as the Dixons.

Re: ‘Quiet’ High D Comparison

The Walton’s Mellow has a wider bore and thus is actually louder than its standard counterpart, which OTOH is relatively quiet.

Re: ‘Quiet’ High D Comparison

Dixon trad is what you want

Re: ‘Quiet’ High D Comparison

No. The Shush whistle is what you want, a tweaked Generation sold only through Big Whistle in the UK http://www.bigwhistle.co.uk/whistles?product_id=223620. Lovely tone and balance but much quieter. I bought one but have barely played it because I prefer playing low whistles. Let me know if you’re interested in buying it.

Re: ‘Quiet’ High D Comparison

My Clarke wooden fipple whistle has a mild and chiffy sound. Short of one that is deliberately altered to be quiet, it is the quietest whistle I own.

Re: ‘Quiet’ High D Comparison

The softest High D I’ve ever owned is the old Feadog MK1 that I’ve been playing since around 1980.

It’s a fantastic player, well balanced, with the easiest sweetest clearest 2nd octave of any whistle I’ve ever played, but with a decently strong low octave too. The overall volume is quite low. I use it for recording and for playing on stage with a mic, but in acoustic situations like sessions it can’t be heard.

I have a good-playing off-the-shelf Generation, a Freeman Generation, and a Sindt, and that old Feadog is noticeably softer than any of them.

To not annoy the neighbors, what about a Dixon Low D? The all-plastic Low D with the conical bore? It’s just about the softest Low D out there, and is a sweet easy ergonomic player.

Re: ‘Quiet’ High D Comparison

The softest whistle I’ve played is a beautiful Weston C made of wood. The tone is lovely and I was able to get the tuning adjusted to my preference without any heartache at all. My Freeman Tweaked Blackbird is also a quieter whistle with a sweet, clear sound but it can be easy to overblow it so I wouldn’t suggest that as someone’s first whistle.

Re: ‘Quiet’ High D Comparison

Chuff -

If you’re not wanting to spend any money them just buy a cheap gen/feadog and pop a lump of blue tack on the fipple at the sound blade (or whatever the technical name for the bit that your air hits after it leaves the initial mouthpiece).

Stuck it on top and basically make the ‘sound blade’ really thick and tall. Then just mold the tack towards the mouth piece. As you do this, the whistle gets quieter and quieter and requires less and less pressure of breath.

The sweetness of tone is usually improved by this process also.

This technique is almost cosy free and gives you loads of control over volume.

For more info see www.chiffandfipple.com for whistle modifications etc.

Re: ‘Quiet’ High D Comparison

Also check out Mack Hoover whistles. He specializes in quiet whistles. I have his telescoping brass and its perfect for small sessions and playing in the house. Or the Parks whistles with the tone ring.

Re: ‘Quiet’ High D Comparison

I’ll second the Hoover. You can even get a Hoover white top to fit on an Oak tube…a simply lovely, low volume, whistle.

Eric