I love my Chieftain but….

I love my Chieftain but….

So, here’s the situation. I need some help selecting a whistle to replace my chieftain. If you want the background, read on. If not, skip to the bottom of the post and tell me what you think.

My background is early music (for which I have some very nice Mollenhauer Kynsekers). Until now, I have always used a recorder for folk (I’m sure many of you will have opinions on this, but now is not the time… 😉). Recently, my favourite folk recorder ‘died’. While I have now bought a lovely one second hand, it’s a bit quiet for gigs, (despite being expensive enough to sound good but not so expensive I can’t put it through it’s paces at weekly Ceilidhs). So, making the step to whistle.

The point is (finally) that I was given a chieftain high D (280104 KWL) by a friend a few years ago, who said that as a Trumpet player and opera singer I might get more use out of it than him. The lower octave is gorgeous, but I can’t sustain the breath for the high notes, and doing it for the duration of a Ceilidh might cause me to pass out. 🙂 I sense from some early snooping that this might be a common problem. On the one hand, it’s a chieftain and gorgeous, on the other, it’s a b****r to play.

So, I am looking for advice on the following

- A soprano D whistle with enough oomph for Ceilidh, but that’s not going to get me excommunicated from my pub session.
- Something that can be played energetically for about 3 hrs non-stop, and will stand a little overblowing.
- Upper price limit of about £30

I have tried a v. cheap Generation, but that was too far the other way…

I appreciate you must get loads of these shouts, so thanks for your time.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

I’d highly recommend Goldie whistles , if you can manage blasting a chieftain a medium or soft blowing goldie would work wonders for you . I have a chieftain myself and the lower octave is brilliant but the higher octave is dangerous . The only thing is goldies are around 200 euros or a high D. You probably won’t find anything of the same calibre for less than 100 quid .
Best of luck

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

Thanks Green. I think that’s part of the problem; I was incredibly lucky in that I got given the Chieftain free, but my budget is very much "recent student first flat not quite beans on toast".

‘Dangerous’ is the word! One reviewer has described it as a cannon 😉 I had to resort to practicing it in my parked car so I could have good shot at wrestling it into submission.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

Do yourself a favour - save up the money and buy a Goldie.

Once you’ve played 5 minutes on a Goldie you will never want to play anything else. I do appreciate that, from where you are at the moment, they are crazily expensive, but if your baseline is a Chieftain you will be used to the feel of the higher end aluminium whistles and you’ll not regret getting a Goldie for a second …

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

I’d suggest to get used to Gen-type whistles. I haven’t played a Chieftain but they’re said to be kind of extreme; a Generation OTOH is the epitome of the whistle sound IMHO, and probably louder than you might think. It just may appear "too far the other way" after playing a Chieftain all the time.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

Thanks both - keep the ideas coming!

Sebastian - I hear what you are saying, but I don’t think I *can* tone down my blow on the Generation. That may be a fault of mine, but it tips over into horrible squeaking at the slightest push. Unfortunately, I know I have a tendency to over-blow when I get really into a gig, and on a mic, that can be a terrible thing 😉 I shall definitely bring it out at the quieter rehearsals though

My quest is for a happy medium.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

Have you thought of a Susato? I am sure there are threads here that might help.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

I play one myself and found out that the high G comes out better with xxxoox the high A plays better with xxooxo (or xxooox) and for the high B it goes better with xoxxxx

besides, with my whistle the higher notes are perfectly in tune with these fingerings. I found them because the whistle got sharp on the high notes with conventional fingerings, and I searched to get them perfectly tuned. Great was my surprise when the notes not only sounded better but came out much easier and allows you to play with less power. At least it works on my high D. Till now i didnt found a solution for the high c natural, not really focused on it neither.

Good luck and keep them blowing

And indeed it is a wonderful beautiful instrument and powerhouse, I love it also very much.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

A beautifull sounding whistle in the middle force of blowing are the "gene milligan" whistles. But also around the 200 euros. I play one of those too. They are better for the family members, less loud but still loud in comparison with much other whistles and they don’t mind to be overblown .

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

If you are interested in high end whistles the wooden ones by Willy Simmons are extremely good.
Check out the big whistle company for details.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

I would recommend a medium blower Goldie. I have a medium blowing Alto F and Soft blowing low D in goldie and also a KWL A and Low D chieftain. All fine whistles but nothig beats Goldie’s in my opinion, the medium blower hits the punch perfectly. (In my opinion) now for cheaper whistles I would maybe suggest Dixon. I had a low F dixon trad and have a dixon trad high D and I love it. On key and mellow/loud. (Again in my opinion)

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

Stefanremy, I’m intrigued by your alternative fingerings for the Chieftain High D, second octave. I will try them, as I also have a bit of trouble getting those notes, but weirdly, I find them coming out flat, not sharp! It is a nice whistle, but I avoid playing above high G because of the tuning. I haven’t found many high D whistles with good back pressure like these, which I like, being predominantly a flute player.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

Wow, thanks for the tips everybody. Yes, as much as I would love a high end whistle right now, I really can’t afford one (having just had help with my second hand Moeck Steenbergen recorder). I will definitely look into saving up for a medium-blow Goldie, but I would like to find something for the short term.

Stefanremy - definitely going to try that next rehearsal. Thanks for the tip

Bredna - "I avoid playing above high G because of the tuning" Alas, I don’t have the puff to sustain anything in the F G A area. 😉 Tuning is the least of my worries.

Jon Dodd - Not sure about the Susato. I’ve heard that they are very like a recorder in tone and technique, in which case I have plenty of those - haha.

Any other votes for Dixon?

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

Dixon’s are very nice whistles (and their customer service is second to none) but I really don’t think there is anything in the Dixon range that has ‘enough oomph for Ceilidh, but that’s not going to get me excommunicated from my pub session’ as you require.

Probably the nearest is the heavy, solid brass DX204, but that doesn’t quite have the presence of the Chieftain and at almost £60.00 it’s over your budget

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Re: I love my Chieftain but….

"The lower octave is gorgeous, but I can’t sustain the breath for the high notes, and doing it for the duration of a Ceilidh might cause me to pass out. 🙂 I sense from some early snooping that this might be a common problem. On the one hand, it’s a chieftain and gorgeous, on the other, it’s a b****r to play."

Learn how to breath when playing the whistle, you need to figure out where to drop notes if necessary, so that you can top up. This is common to all whistle and flute playing, more of an issue on flute and low whistle. You should be able to play any whistle, regardless of it’s wind requirements, just by adjusting what you leave out and where you breathe.

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Re: I love my Chieftain but….

‘drop or shorten notes’, I meant to write..

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Re: I love my Chieftain but….

http://www.irishmusik.com/tony-dixon-trad-nickle-improved-tunable-whistle/ or http://www.irishmusik.com/tony-dixon-dx006-tuneable-d-aluminium-whistle/

My good friend and MD has a tuneable D chieftain, so even with a mic I’m not going to be able to compete with that, but it would be nice to be able to hear myself a little more’

Definitely not the Trad, lovely whistle but a little demure for your needs.

The DX006 is a little on the breathy side.

As stated above this is probably best suited to your needs:

http://www.irishmusik.com/dx204-tuneable-heavy-brass-whistle/

Can also be used a cudgel when under attack, VERY heavy brass,

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Re: I love my Chieftain but….

^^ What Kilcash said. The high D should take a lot less air than a Chieftain low D, and the high notes on a Chieftain low D (up to the high B anyway) are all definitely achievable mid-tune as long as you can manage your breathing spots well (and I was a smoker for a long time when I primarily played low whistles!).

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

Colman and Kilcash - Thanks for the pep talk. I know that there is still a lot I have to learn, and I am definitely not going to give up on the Chieftain. Unfortunately, practice space/time is difficult (read my comment about my car above!), so I was looking for something I could learn with ‘on the job’ without sounding terrible.

I have to admit that I do quite a bit of selective dropping of notes to be able to play at full dance speed. Any more and there won’t be any tune left! Tone is difficult to communicate online, but I really do appreciate the advice 🙂 I am just (perhaps foolishly) looking for an interim fix.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

"Any other votes for Dixon?"

The Dixon Trad is a very fine whistle IMO, but volume-wise it’s in the same range as Gens. It has a slightly larger bore though, which makes it a bit more forgiving regarding breath control, if that’s what you’re after.

As for Susatos, if you’re not sure there’s also a cheap (Chinese?) Susato "inspired" line going by various names, e.g. Ferris whistles. These are actually not that bad IMO, although reviews are mixed. They’re definitively on the louder side anyway and take quite a push… might be worth a consideration. Here’s a discussion on C&F (and some moral concerns): http://forums.chiffandfipple.com/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=86161

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

"#1- A soprano D whistle with enough oomph for Ceilidh, but that’s not going to get me excommunicated from my pub session.
#2- Something that can be played energetically for about 3 hrs non-stop, and will stand a little overblowing.
#3- Upper price limit of about £30"

I’ll start with #3 first. You’re used to recorders of very high quality, right?

Would you be satisfied performing on a recorder that cost £30 new? Probably not. Whistles and recorders are both musical instruments and in general you get what you pay for.

About #1, that is unanswerable, because we can’t know the volume required for your Ceilidh, and we can’t know the volume which would get you excommunicated from your session. Sessions vary tremendously. Finding the right volume will probably require trying various whistles. And of course the same whistle can’t be both quiet and loud.

About #2 I’m not quite sure what that’s asking. What is energetic playing? A whistle’s air requirements are built into the design and they’re the same regardless of the player’s energy level. I do prize air-efficiency in whistles and I could easily play any of my whistles from Low D up to High D for three hours, and have done.

About overblowing, each note of any whistle is only in tune at one pressure, and overblowing just makes a whistle play sharp.

Anyhow all the low-cost mass-produced whistles like Generations have the volume they have. A very good Generation has enough volume for most situations. If you need a really loud whistle then there’s Susato, and people coming from a recorder background usually like Susatos more than people coming from a trad background. In fact Susatos ARE recorders: the same models are often available either with a recorder body or a whistle body. The 2nd octaves are really loud, though there’s an "O-ring tweak" you can do to make the 2nd octave more civilised.

Recorder players also usually love Burkes but they’re far above your price range. Burkes have larger-diameter tubes than most whistles size-per-size which makes them louder and also require more volume of air.

The Dixons I’ve played have a flat 2nd octave which does require the high notes to be blown up to pitch; if you want to do any overblowing that’s where to do it.

Not a huge fan of most Chieftans I’ve played, sorry to say.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

Oh and yes a Goldie will be nice and loud and its flattish 2nd octave will allow, require, strong blowing.

About overblowing, it’s a tradeoff of course. A whistle with a flattish 2nd octave require strong blowing of the high notes to get them up to pitch, but also requires that the low octave be somewhat underblown. Why? Because if you blow the low octave too strongly it will play at a pitch level that the 2nd octave won’t be capable of achieving no matter how hard you blow.

My MKs are the reverse, and require the low octave to be blown as strongly as possible, to get it up to the pitch level of the 2nd octave (which is sharper than most whistles). I have to be very careful to not overblow the 2nd octave of the MK.

Some whistles like Burkes and Reyburns are right in the middle, and you could blow both octaves equally strongly.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

It’s easy to test how air-efficient a whistle is. Take a full breath and time how many seconds you can sustain High B evenly and on pitch. You’ll find that some whistles can be sustained twice as long as others.

It’s important to do this test while checking your pitch against a tuner. That prevents you from overblowing or underblowing the note.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

Hi Richard,

Gosh, what a full reply. Thanks. I do understand your point about price, but in my case the question would best be "Would you be happy playing on £30 recorder/whistle when you are just getting used to the instrument and have a tight budget"? For which the answer is yes. In fact, the lovely Mollenhauer I used for folk for the last three years was about that price (marketed as a sort of ‘first wooden recorder’), and it did it’s job valiantly, until the strain of constant heavy playing proved a little too much. While I will be sticking with the whistle, at this stage I don’t want to be "all the gear and no idea".

As for ‘energetic playing’, it’s what it says on the tin. Large ceilidh, small room, hoarse caller, amp system, three hours of very loud and very fast music, with perhaps a shade too much enthusiasm. 😉 Awesome, but not an experience I’d put my more delicate recorders through.

Alas I can’t pick my pitch. With a (hopefully!) concert tuned band and a pitch-perfect MD, I can’t tune relative to my own capabilities. 🙂 I only mentioned the over-blowing as I know it’s a fault I have at the top end, so I want something that won’t go sharp or squeak too easily.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

Bredna, this is how I tested the chieftain high d and came to my "weird" fingerings (see up) . I played against a tuner and looked for the lowest sustain it took to get my high G A and B out of it before the octave dropped. With my whistle they were definitely sharp, almost 15-20%. I’m a former sax and hobo player (recorder also for over 35 years but keep this quiet) and the chieftain high d requires just a lot of sustain simply to get those high notes out of it.

I hope you can find fingerings that suit your whistle that goes flat but I’m afraid this will be impossible. Perhaps it could help to flatten the whole whistle and give more sustain in both low and upper octave, this way you can sharpen the upper octave and use the alternative fingerings. I love mine because I like the sustain needed, and it gives a lot of color to the tone.

Off course it’s not a whistle for a session, everybody would hate you.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

@Richard

‘It’s easy to test how air-efficient a whistle is. Take a full breath and time how many seconds you can sustain High B evenly and on pitch. You’ll find that some whistles can be sustained twice as long as others’

Why High B ?

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Re: I love my Chieftain but….

They look really nice those Impempe’s what’s the volume like Davy?

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Re: I love my Chieftain but….

Hi Findle
They are about the same as the equivalent brass Burke and are about as robust. I have the low D Impempe and it would do double duty as a club. The two friends that have the high D Impempes love them to bits, they do take a little time to warm up, but you get a nice responsive tone out of them (even me).

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

Nice one thanks Davy.

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Re: I love my Chieftain but….

"Why High B ?"

The air-efficiency testing I’ve done has all been on Low D whistles, and on every make I’ve tested High B takes more air than any other note. One could use High G instead, and I have done. On the 15 or so makes of Low D I’ve tested High B takes somewhat more than High G.

High G and other notes in the 2nd octave always take more air than notes in the low octave. The discrepancy varies from make to make, but it’s always there. Some whistles are far less efficient in the 2nd octave than the first; some can be sustained twice as long as others on the high notes.

I’ve also done the time-test in a "real world" way by playing a particular tune which ranges over the whole range of the whistle, rather than just sustaining one note. Still it’s when the tune is around High G, A, and B that the differences really come out.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

"I only mentioned the over-blowing as I know it’s a fault I have at the top end, so I want something that won’t go sharp or squeak too easily."

Well then a whistle that requires the 2nd octave to be blown strongly would be for you. Yes try a vintage Overton, or a new Goldie. They’re among the best whistles on the planet, and they’re particularly strong in the 2nd octave. Colin Goldie will "voice" your whistle however you want it, with higher backpressure/resistance meaning more economy in the quantity or volume of air, or more freeblowing.

About squeaking in the 2nd octave, these can occur both when it’s overblown, and also when underblown. Since I’m used to whistles with very easy 2nd octaves (Sindts and MKs) I squeak when I play a whistle with a more resistant 2nd octave, like a high Overton, or high Susato.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

@Richard

RE: High B

Thanks

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Re: I love my Chieftain but….

Get yourself a Goldie. Tremendous workmanship. He will craft the whistle to your requirements. Best, Moritz

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

A Freeman MelloDog would be my suggestion. They can be had for around 30 GBP. They are a larger bore whistle with good volume and clarity of tone. I prefer them to any but the top end at far higher prices.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

That should have been Freeman Mellow Dog. They can be found on eBay.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

I got a Mellow Dog years ago. I played it, in the house, precisely once. I wouldn’t want to play it where anyone could hear it. I find them harsh, with not enough volume but too harsh a tone to be useable. Strange name if you ask me, as I don’t find them "mellow" at all. (Oh, and btw, I’ve tried someone else’s, after hearing them play and wondering if it was them or the whistle. I found the same result.) If you’re after something tweaked, then the Cillian O Briain whistles are far better. And, for untweaked, try the Killarneys. (Probably been said above, but worth saying again, IMO.)

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

This thread https://thesession.org/discussions/34807 and some on C&F seem to have good reviews of Killarneys. Anyone want to chime in with violent opinions against? 😉 I really appreciate the time you are all taking; thanks. I like the fact it seems to have positive reviews for easy flipping between octaves (something which I need to do a lot), and that it’s nicely balanced between octaves.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

On the subject of Killarney whistles, does anyone know how to get hold of them?

I’ve written to them THREE times via the contact link on the website but never had a response (I want to know if the intend doing a Bb in time)

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Re: I love my Chieftain but….

I spent a while playing through the range of inexpensive whistles, tweaking etc…..still have them around the place and now my daughter is playing them all to see what she likes. It sounds like at least fairly soon though you will want to be into a ‘better’ whistle; lots of votes for Goldie here, but I will add my vote for Impempe and one I don’t think has been mentioned, Humphrey Whistles. I have an Impempe D, Humphrey D and C (and a bunch of Sindts, which I love but are harder to get now). All are outside your price range but maybe there are some used ones around. Big Whistle has tuneable Imempe’s for £57. Humphrey is louder, Imempe is more pure and clear (which you might like)…..I had always figured it was similar to a Burke from the description, but I played a Burke for the first time a while ago and I was personally not too impressed; will stick with what I have got. Sindts and Goldies are very well known, don’t need me to repeat the accolades; Impempes and Humphreys maybe less so, but they are beautiful whistles and the prices are very reasonable.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

I don’t understand that about the Killarney website. I don’t have any connection with them, but whenever I’ve messaged them or, indeed, after several such, when I ordered a couple of whistles, they responded almost immediately each time. I’d say to try again …

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

Funnily enough, I was buying some new whistles a while back and around the time I was buying a D whistle from them I emailed the Killarney guys asking if they had any plans to make an Eb whistle in the near future. I got no response, but they started offering an Eb whistle for sale shortly aftwerwards. Maybe a Bb will suddenly appear on their site in the next few weeks 🙂

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

I’ve got one of their Eb whistles, Colman. It’s great. You know how good their D whistles are? Well, for some reason, the Eb is even better - really sweet tone and about the easiest whistle to play I’ve come across. Perfectly in tune, and great balance of volume across the whole two octaves.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

How odd … I swear I spelled your name right, fada ‘n’ all … 😏

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

I picked up one of Jerry Freeman’s Blackbird Eb whistles a while back and you’d have a hard time persuading me to replace it - my only little issue is that it’s quiet in the first octave and a tad harsh in the upper end of the second. What’s the overall volume of your Eb like? The Killarney D I got was too quiet for anything but a very small and quiet session and to be honest has only seen the light of day a handful of times (although the D I got seems to have been something of a lemon in terms of tuning, so maybe its volume wasn’t typical either).

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

…and I only use the fada in my name about half the time anyway. Even Irish people seem to struggle with fadas so it’s often easier to just omit it entirely from my name. Written Irish is another kettle of ball games - the fadas are definitely necessary there as fadas, or lack of them, can entirely change the meaning of a word.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

Well after much umming and aahing, I have decided the Killarney is the way to go. I was also sorely tempted by the Impepe, but the £17 price difference (with shipping), does make a difference! The plan going forward is to buy a Killarney, and then start saving up for a Goldie.

I haven’t quite ordered it yet, so last chance for any nay-sayers 😉

(I have to admit that as my family is from Kerry and my surname is Buckley, it also seems like a nice co-incidence). The range of good-sounding videos swung it for me; and not all from the manufacturer, which is important.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

The Killarney is (with respect) a ‘posh’ Generation (you do realise that Killareny ONLY make the head the body is just a bog standard Feadog Pro?) Impempe’s are hand made, very well engineered from top to bottom (so I’ve read) and MUCH nearer to a Goldie than a Killarney.

MAY be worth spending that extra £17.00 ?

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Re: I love my Chieftain but….

Findle, the Impempe whistles are well engineered, they are built like tanks, and would take much more abuse than the Killarney.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

Yes .. that’s what I said Davy.

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Re: I love my Chieftain but….

Aaargh you guys! 😉 Every time I come close to making a decision, I swing back the other way. I think the sound of the Impepe is much more flute-like, (like my Chieftain), but the Killarney sound is more cheap/traditional/however you want to look at it.

Perhaps I am trying to convince myself, but if I want that flutey sound I still have the Chieftain, (and, for that matter, my recorder collection). Killarney would be the cheaper option and give a different style.

I realise that it might be false economy in the long run, but £50 vs £63 (I got it wrong before) is actually pretty big for me.

OK, the last and most important question. What’s the breath pressure needed for a reliable 2nd octave on the Impepe? Bear in mind I find repeated Es and Fs on my Chieftain hard going.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

Have a search on Chiff & Fipple, few Impempe threads on there.

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Re: I love my Chieftain but….

It would be ironic, when two of the requirements appear to be greater-than-average volume, and greater-than-average resistance to overblowing, if you found the Killarney to be just to your liking!

Because it’s an extremely freeblowing sweet whistle, requiring delicate breath control, diametrically opposite the Susato Goldie or Burke which require strong support.

The Killarney is more or less a Sindt knockoff, though it plays somewhat differently and some prefer it to the Sindt. I have both and like both.

I ordered my Killarney D and it came straight away.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

‘I ordered my Killarney D and it came straight away’

??

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Re: I love my Chieftain but….

Ok, info I have found so far is that the Impempe takes less back pressure than an Overton but more than a Generation. Are the Overton and Chieftain comparable? I have no idea, and reading can only tell you so much. Anyone own both and want to comment?

As an aside, I did have a great rehearsal with the Chieftain last night. Took some tips from flute playing friends, and a lot more breaths, and had it sounding lovely on Si Bheag Si Mhor. Looks like it will now be my ‘go to’ for airs and waltzes while I work out how to tackle the faster stuff with it. Such a lovely tone, and blends oh so nicely with the other Chieftain in the band…

Impempe owners - do you still get a bright tone on the higher notes?

A decision is made!

After two days of changing my mind almost constantly, I have ordered the Impempe tuneable. Very excited, and I’ll let you know what I think when it arrives.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

You wil not regret this, I bought my impempe whistle a few months ago and it quickly became one of my favorite whistles to play, together with the syn whistle. I also used to play the chieftain high d but got a lot of complaints of the family members (and neighbours s s s)

I love both whistles and both are very different compared one another, and both are very well tuned. C natural on the syn seems to demand 0xxx0(0 or x), on the impempe 0xx000

once you got it, tell us how you like it.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

Hi there,

Apologies for the delay, got a lot going on. I received the Impempe about a week ago, and it’s not good news I’m afraid. It looks gorgeous, but sounds like someone has stuffed cotton wool in it. The notes are incredibly breathy and woolly, and sometimes the sound cuts out altogether (even with constant breath pressure). As you can imagine, I was very surprised given the rave reviews both here and elsewhere. The sound is such that friends and I actually examined inside with a torch to see if we’d missed some packaging. :D Didn’t have the clean(er) sound I was expecting from an aluminium whistle

I have contacted Big Whistle, and am sending it back to them for inspection.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

sorry to hear this. Mine is really a clear pure tone. Almost no breath at all. Bought it also from big whistle. It also plays as smooth in both octaves. Let’s hear it if something came up afterwards. ;-((

Sure at Big Whistle they will sort it out. Good service over there.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

Big Whistle have, as predicted, been great. It turns out that there was some bore wax (?!) left in the windway of my Impempe, hence why it sounded like someone had shoved a sock in it. They have fixed it and are returning it to me to try again, along with a small freebie to cover my postage. Very knowledgeable, and happy to chat again if the Imp. doesn’t suit me after all.

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

Hi,

lovely to read this. I was quite sure about the big whistle service!!!

I do hope you will receive a beautiful whistle like mine, it’s a real pleasure to play it.

Greets

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

Much better now fixed! I haven’t had a chance to play it much yet, but the balance between octaves is lovely, and I like the tone. Clear low notes (although my bottom D is less strong), with enough chiff in the top octave to keep that ‘traditional’ sound. A good halfway house between the purity and clarity (and hard blow) of a Cheiftain, and the low pressure rasp of a Generation.
As soon as April rolls round, I am putting myself on the waiting list for a medium blow Goldie. Sooo many people have told me that’s the way to go (including people selling other whistles…)

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

Thank you so much for all of the help everyone. I really appreciate it, as it’s been a much more complicated process than I thought. 🙂

Impempe Update

Just a quick update on my Impempe, now that I have had time to play it a bit more. Overwhelmingly positive.

The sound may start a little harsh, but it warms up into a lovely round tone. I know these things are subjective, but it has the right amount of breathiness for me. Enough to give character, but not annoyingly so. Bright and clear with a very easy upper octave (perhaps too much so for some of you, although I don’t find it flips between octaves unwanted).

Most alternate/’cheat’ fingerings work well too, which is a bonus. Reminds me of quite a flute-y sound, but still clearly a whistle which I like…

Re: I love my Chieftain but….

OK I know this is a late response. I discovered the Impembpe whistle and bought it for a friend, she is delighted with it. I’m not so impressed, it plays well but the finish is "cheap". My own favorite by a long way is my Alba Q1 (which they no longer make). I’ve tried other Alba whistles, all good and easy to play with no huge breath demand, nice tone and medium back pressure - and not expensive. (I’ve also tried a Goldie, I guess they take some getting used to.)
For LOUD sessions I go back to my Chieftain or Sweetheart.