Amplifier, soundefects..whistleplaying

Amplifier, soundefects..whistleplaying

Wondered if someone could help me with a setup for Whistle playing. Thinking of some lightweight amplifier, microphone and soundefects (that nice sound you hear, like playing in a church…) Some ideas? Also, is there any way to use mobile for this? (thinking of apps)

Re: Amplifier, soundefects..whistleplaying

You’d be best to avoid any kind of guitar amplifier, as these are designed specifically to make guitar sound good, and don’t sound nice with many other instruments. I own, and like a lot, the Roland CM-30, which I use for fiddle amplification:

http://www.roland.com/products/cm-30/

But if you need more power, the Marshall AS50D is good for acoustic instruments, and has some effects built in (which the Roland does not).

I’ve seen plenty of videos on youtube of people using pedals marked as being for vocal effects with flute, so they could work for whistle as well. The Boss VE-5 is a nice portable box, but haven’t tried it. There are loads of vocal effects boxes out there to look at.

Re: Amplifier, soundefects..whistleplaying

Why? What are you trying to achieve - are you playing live, recording yourself, or just wanting to experiment at home?

The best way make it sound like you’re playing in a church is to play in a church. If you want to roughly simulate that sound you need an amp with reverb, a phone isn’t going to do you any good. As mentioned above, ordinary guitar amps aren’t great, a small pa system is better as they are designed to amplify without distortion. If you are recording at home, I don’t know about phones but there are a number of recording apps like Garageband or Audacity that run on PCs and tablets, all will have reverb. You normally record the instrument dry, and add the reverb afterwards.

Re: Amplifier, soundefects..whistleplaying

Like Mark said, you need to think about where you are going to play.

I have liked using a small PA setup that uses powered speakers and (maybe) a small mixing board. With a board, you can plug your friends in, too.

You basically get yourself 2 self powered speakers, 2 speaker stands, a small board and cables to connect it all

Which 2 self powered speakers and just what board to buy depends on where you plan to play and how many inputs you think you will need

Then you should think about going with a microphone or using a transducer for yourself

For effects, if it was me, I would get a rack unit and run it in the effects loop of your small board. Running the effects in the board’s loop lets you apply the effect to more than one channel, so if you wanted you could put a light reverb on the whole mix. You’d be looking for reverb, chorus, maybe compression…basic "wettening" effects. What would do for a vocalist would suit your whistle.

Re: Amplifier, soundefects..whistleplaying

I use a Roland Microcube, principally for Christmas Carol-singing accompaniment these days, but it includes 6 different settings for input ( as well as volume and a single tone control ) one of which is microphone, and two rotary switches which give a spread of effects including reverb and chorus ( plus it’s battery-powered if need be ). It made my bouzouki sound better than it really is, so it could do the same for your whistle. There are now mikes for flute, whistle, etc., that can clip on to the top end of the whistle, above the top hole, with a mini-gooseneck to angle the mike towards the fipple.

Re: Amplifier, soundefects..whistleplaying

Avoid Amps that are dedicated for Electric guitar. The "clean" channel is thrown on for show in lesser expensive amps. An acoustic or keyboard amp is best. They usually have more options available (1 or 2 channels, more responsive EQ, ect). Try to find an amp with a true "spring reverb" (this is difficult, but they are out there) DSP effects are a poor sounding to my ear IMNSHO. Personally, I prefer the Acoustic AG60 over all the others (it’s discontinued, but there are some out there. Marshall is over-rated and this can be confirmed when played side by side to other manufacturers. Mic wise, I like using a Headset style mike as this can be adjusted in placement close to the fipple blade mor consistantly than a stand mounted Mic. Audio Technica’s System 8 and System 9 wireless headset Mics can be had for around $150 to 200 (not much more than you’d pay for a decent condensor mic, avoid dynamics as they are not really suited for use on instruments other than voice).