Where can I buy such a bodhran.

Where can I buy such a bodhran.

Morning, can anyone tell me where I can distance buy a reasonably priced bodhran such as is used in the attached video. If I’m not mistaken, this would be a Scottish bodhran. Thanks, Rosie.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pGaiiCRJg7U

Re: Where can I buy such a bodhran.

There’s a bodhran ?
I think you’ve posted the wrong video.
ALSO; Scottish ? Irish ? I see basically two types of bodhran - the older type, basically a North African-pattern frame drum, as taken along by Sean Riada to an early pre-Chieftains session after the musicians had objected to the tambourine-player he’d previously brought in, and asked the guy to tape up the jingles; and the later/more modern deeper-rimmed type, usually a smaller diameter, and often tuneable.
To call one Scottish or Irish is giving airs to a very modern, not to say bastard, instrument ( if one can call it that ). And not much older than the "Irish" bouzouki…

Re: Where can I buy such a bodhran.

Pete’s right. Must be the wrong video…

There’s no such thing as a ‘Scottish’ bodhran, unless you mean a bodhran that was made in Scotland. There are bodhran makers all over the place, but the use of the bodhran as we now understand it is originally an Irish phenomenon which has spread out.

Congrats to Pete for his excellent use of the Norman French, there! Often heard the word used with reference to bodhran players; less often to the bodhrans themselves 🙂

m.d.

Re: Where can I buy such a bodhran.

Father and son, not brothers.

Re: Where can I buy such a bodhran.

Thanks BigDavy, that’s the video I meant to post and that’s indeed the bodhran I’m looking for. Much obliged.
I’ve only seen Scottish players or groups use them.
My French is pretty good, but never heard that adjective used before.
Rosie.

Re: Where can I buy such a bodhran.

Greetings Rosie

Did you know that ‘bodhran’ also means a deaf person?

Hope you’re enjoying your flute and getting lots of tunes,

All the best

Brian x

Re: Where can I buy such a bodhran.

Hallo Brian, níor dheineas roimh an ceanghaill idir ‘bodhar’ agus ‘bodhrán’.
Rudaí ag dul go maith leis an bhfluit. Suil agam go bhfuil gach rud go breá sa Tasmáin. Rosie.

Re: Where can I buy such a bodhran.

MD: Yes, Norman-French indeed ! On the Patrick O’Brien site that I used to frequent there was a contributor who called himself The Last Of The True French Bastards. It took me some time before I found the quote…….

Re: Where can I buy such a bodhran.

That looks like a Hedwitshak. Google " Art Bodhràn"

Re: Where can I buy such a bodhran.

The Bodhràn , the Crowdy Crawn ( the Welsh version) and the scottish version (ive no idea what its called) all developed in the their own right from the tambourine , and in the case if the scottish and welsh version , from the winnowing sieve in the case of the Bodhràn. Though It was no doubt inspired from the tambourine, there is a chicken v egg debate there also. What is certain though is that while there may have bern a certain amount of migration from northern spain ( basque) , the north african influence is an imagination.
Frame Drums originated in their own right on every continent except Australia.
What makes the Irish Frame Drum ( the Bodhràn)unique and original is the manner in which it is played not its construction. There is also evidence that the bodhran made its way to Portneuf in New foundland over 200 years ago. Which in ITM terms makes it older than the banjo , the accordian and arguably the Uileann pipes as we know them

Re: Where can I buy such a bodhran.

What makes the Irish Frame Drum unique is the way the myths have grown up over its origins.
If you can find any illustration, recording, film or video, or text, clearly dated to before O’Riada brought his frame drum to the pre-Chieftains recording session, that shows a bodhran as opposed to a tambourine, then I’ll buy you a pint of your favourite.
I’m not too worried about spending my money.

Re: Where can I buy such a bodhran.

Yes BUT……was anyone playing a simple frame drum, SANS JINGLES ( i.e. NOT a tambourine ), in Ireland immediately before O’Riada’s intervention.
The one illustration described in that long-winded article clearly shows a tambourine ( I know our favourite historian Mary Beard says that it is the job of an academic to make things complicated, but that article is a load of fluff, smoke, and mirrors )…….