LOL

LOL

I text people a lot on my mobile, but have a problem with some abbreviations. LOL is used a fair bit by people in discussion threads on this site. A friend reckons it means Lots of Laughs, or Laugh out Loud, and I originally thought it meant Lots of Love. Zina Lee, you’ve used it a couple of times, but I can’t divine your meaning from the context.

Please could I be enlightened? Thank you.

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when Zina uses it it ALWAYS means lots of love and don’t you dare doubt it or she’ll break both of your legs.

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Where I come from it usually means Loyal Orange Lodge!!

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I thought it was about that bloke from 10cc….what’s his name Creme…the 70’s Manchester band, who had hits with Oh Donna and Lazy Days…no?

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Like Or Lump it?

Leave Or get Lacerated?

Lush old Loser?

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Lick One’s Lips
Lesions On Legs(?)

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Lashings Of Lager?

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Legless On Lager?

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Low Ornery Layabout

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Luminous Orange Leggings - to go with your boots, Joe?

Posted by .

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Nice one, Matthew.

Joe

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That’s cleared that up then!

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I use it to mean Laugh Out Loud! But one time I sent an email to a friend and used “LOL”. His wife read the email and was furious cuz she thought it meant Lot’s of Love…ooops 😉

Joyce

Posted by .

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ROFLMAO – you guys are fecking hilarious. Yes, Pete, it’s Laugh Out Loud. ROFL = Rolling On Floor Laughing

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And what’s the “MAO” for Zina? Does it mean chinese communist party leaders rolling on the floor laughing?

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It means I have an affinity for cats. *grin* My A** Off, of course. Which you knew already.

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LOL

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LOL

That about wraps it up I’d say.

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I like to LOL around as a drunkard, as you know, Pete, especially in Shillelaghs after the Catford beer festival. It’s a hard life, but that’s the way it is. I have been known occasionally to play some tunes on the flute. So you can cherry pick the bits you like and leave the unsavoury bits, without complaining. Everyone else does so without making it a problem. That said, it’d be nice to see you around again and we have tentative plans of making a raid on kent sometime this summer - and if I’m driving, there won’t any LOLling :~}

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Good men yerselves, LOF, (+Sarah), twould be good to see you, there’s a freeform Fri night session in Rochester we could usefully meet at, it would turn totally Celtic instantly! Like last Friday when Me and Andybanjo tried it out.

Thanks to you all for the enlightening interpretations of LOL; I did indeed LOL (it does seem to be a verb) at some of the originals, viz Lashings of Lager (to go with the tongue sandwiches no doubt- did E Blyton realise the sexual imagery she was immortalising? Mmmm nice licky dog Timmy!)
My best LOL was for Sexy Tunes - My Darling’s a Sheep, thank you whoever that was, I love a good belly laugh.

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Why am I in brackets???????
LOL

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Guys, can you help me with this one:
MAO ZE DONG

= ????

jOE

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Leaving of Liverpool?

AAAAAAAAAAAGH

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MAO TSETUNG, surely?
If not, the Little Red books must constitute the biggest proof-reading error in history(!)

Yours pedantically, etc…

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MAO TSE-TUNG is the Wade-Giles transcription, which they still use in Taiwan but rarely use elsewhere nowadays; MAO ZEDONG is the modern pinyin transliteration for Mandarin Chinese. So you’re both right, but if you want to get with the times you write ZEDONG. And working with both is an absolute nightmare. In Taiwan they can’t quite decide which one to use, and sometimes you can walk along a street and see signs with 4 or 5 different spellings of the street name. You’ve gotta feel sorry for the postmen!
Yours even more pedantically… 🙂

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(Ever looked at your Chinese takeaway menu and wondered why it says “Szechwan” when the one next door reads “Sichuan”? That’s why.)

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(And it’s why “Peking” is now “Beijing”. Okay I’ll stop being an Asianist geek now)

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God, trust me to start talking about the transliteration of modern Mandarin Chinese (like: *yawn*) when everyone else is getting “Legless On Lager”. I’m awaiting a decent answer to Joe Quinn’s question. I made one up myself but it’s too rude to print, and contains the words “Zebra’s Erection”.

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But, Dow, surely street names in Taiwan will be written up in Chinese characters, unless of course they have the pinyin transliteration written underneath, if that´s what you mean. But that shouldn´t cause any problems for the postmen who would, presumably, read it in Chinese characters ?
My Chinese goes no further than a brief “Ni How” when going into a Chinese restaurant which, more often than not, is met with a withering smile 🙂

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A lot of the street signs have the romanisation underneath. It causes problems for postmen if they have letters from people who can’t write Chinese (there are a lot of expats there too remember, and foreigners with Chinese friends), or taxi drivers driving foreigners who can’t speak or write Chinese. Hey murbox, next time you go to a Chinese restaurant, try this phrase: “cao ni!” [pron. tsow ni], it means “how are you?”.

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Of course all this has nothing to do with the music for most people, but for me, 3 out of about 7 or 8 people out of our regular session lot in Sydney speak Mandarin by pure coincidence, and they’re all Caucasian. Go figure…

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Yeah, I see what you mean. I thought “Ni How” meant How Are You? No wonder I´ve been getting some funny looks!
ITM content: Do you like “The Chieftains in China” album? 🙂
Mike

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Dow, you’re only so gung-ho for the ‘MAO ZEDONG’ version so you can get your zebra’s erection in(!) Why not use the other spelling and go for a ‘Termite’s erection’ - they are more impressive than the Zebra’s and never subside, unless knocked over by a hungry ant-eater…

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Surely lads being a question shouldn’t it be “Ni how mah” and “cao ni mah”

yours
extremely pedantically

Joe

P.S. Go on Dow whaddidya work out mah

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Actually, it depends on whether you speak Mandarin or Cantonese, Mike. My family speaks Cantonese, and we do indeed say “ni hao?” or “hao ma?” for “hello, how are you today?” But let’s face it, it’s possible not be able to speak “Chinese” with someone from the next village over. It’s a really big country – imagine Irish over a country the size of China, and you’ll pretty much have the idea.

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Fair ’nuff, Zeens.

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How did this thread get to China?

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Zina started it with LMAO.

Squealer : - )

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It wasn’t me, it was Jack. I simply was laughing. heh.

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Wow Joe I’m impressed. Yes, “ni hao” means something like “hello”, “ni hao ma?” means “how are you?”, and “cao ni” means, um, “show me the menu pls”.

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Don’t be, Mark. I have an unfair advantage, I run a school for Chinese students of English. Any more offers on Mao Zedong?