St Patty or St Pattie?

St Patty or St Pattie?

I note the absence of the ‘It’s Not Called St Patty’s Day’ thread this year. So, with tongue firmly in cheek, here it is!

🙂

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St. Patsy’s Day, surely?.. 😉

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What…, St. Pastry, you mean.

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I think you may be thinking of St Pastie, the patron saint of Cornish baked goods?

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Or St. Pastie, the patron saint of pole dancers.

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I know it’s supposed to mean something for Ireland. But I don’t know if it does or not. I mean no disrespect to the intended banter of this discussion. But right now I’m finding so many other things which seem more significant to me. This is the worst of times & the best of times.

Can someone tell me if or why the holiday is significant for you. Or why not; fair play.

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Thanks for posting this, Himself.
I appreciate what we have here in being able to discuss things on an open forum.

Thank you, Jeremy.

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It’s significant to me in that when I name a price to a publican this weekend, they’ll respond ‘OK’. Other than that, not really, or at all, if I’m being really honest. I’ve never been to a parade. I’ve never watched one on TV. I Don’t wear green. I’m not anti- it. I’m just not a tourist.

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Cheers, Himself.
So it’s mostly a way to get a well paid gig? Strangely enough I find it comforting to know that working musicians are able to name their price for at least an annual gig.

My answer is Patrick, or Paddy.

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Patrick………….The Welshman?

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What do you mean, "the Welshman"? He was English surely?

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Which Patsy would you be talking of now? If you were to go by the number of wells, beds and churches found around Ireland connected with St.Patrick - you’d have to conclude that he was one hell of a well traveled and busy chap.

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St Patrick was captured from the Welsh coast and taken back to Ireland, but he was born a Roman in England somewhere.

One of the things I always liked about that story was that it was one of the few times in history that the Irish were actually the ones doing the raiding. 🙂

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"Can someone tell me if or why the holiday is significant for you"

its mostly a religious feast to me AB. Falling on a Friday in Lent this year, Bishop gave us all a dispensation so we don’t have to follow the rule of abstaining from meat this Friday

but I was already booked to play classical music this Friday, so it didn’t have any effect on my pay. I am going to play a set of variations on popular Irish tunes by Mauro Giuliani from the early 19th century, but other than learning a special set of pieces for this week, which was my choice, there isn’t much difference.

But after I play this week I don’t necessarily have to eat fish, so maybe I’ll have a porterhouse

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St Patrick wasn’t an ‘Englishman’ because the English didn’t exist in the 5th c - the Germanic tribes that would
eventually become the English had only just started crossing the North Sea to settle the former Roman province of Brittania. A Welshman probably. History class over.

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5th century is the 400s. Patrick was a Roman and was kidnapped and taken to Ireland in the early 400s. Rome wasn’t even sacked by the Vandals yet. You are talking about a hundred years after with those Germanic tribes and all that

…just sayin’ 🙂

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@Nate….Just out of interest, I thought the Pope had rescinded that thing about not eating meat on Fridays?

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"St Patrick wasn’t an ‘Englishman’ because the English didn’t exist in the 5th c … A Welshman probably …"

But the notion of ‘Welsh’ only came about with the arrival of the Germanic invaders (the word being from a germanic root, meaning ‘stranger’). The endonym for the Welsh people is ‘Cymry’ (singular ‘Cymro’), thought to have been in use before the 7th Century and to have referred to all Brythonic speaking peoples (modern-day Welsh, Cornish and Breton). But it would be both pompous and culturally appropriative for us English speakers to use that term. It would be safest to say that St. Patrick was a ‘Briton’.

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Given all the tribes and different nationalities that occupied what is now Britain, Ireland and the rest of Europe, I guess it’s not really possible to give nationality to St.Patrick. I believe that 99% of written history is bullcrap anyway. The only thing that really matters is that St. Pat invented Guinness and was accordingly and justifiably made a Saint Re your question Ben of why we all celebrate the day…. well I’m afraid I just don’t understand the question!

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Gobby….years ago it used to be all Fridays of the year we didn’t eat meat, but the change was from that to just not eating meat on Fridays of Lent.

but since the Feast of St Patrick is a high feast and St Patrick is the patron of our diocese, we get a special dispensation this week with the feast day falling on Friday.


edit: and by "we" I mean the folks here in our diocese.

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Thanks Nate. Then if I was a Catholic I’d move to where you live!

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and that would work, too, Gobby….the wording of the dispensation is such that it applies to residents of the diocese and anyone travelling that is in the geographic confines of the diocese

…so we could go out and order a couple of porterhouse steaks after I get done playing Friday night!

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I guess Jeremy must be right that I don’t think before I post. Also it’s very early in the morning over here in Oz and my brain must still be asleep because after making my last post I walked into the kitchen to make some breakfast and then I remembered, I’m bloody vegetarian aren’t I? That should indicate just how much bollocks I waffle on with on this board!… ??? ….. (Hmmm…. Waffles!…)

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"years ago it used to be all Fridays of the year we didn’t eat meat, but the change was from that to just not eating meat on Fridays of Lent."

You must be a bunch of slackers out there Nate and moral degenerates too ;) I always see a local fish stall here every Friday in good ‘ol holy Catholic Ireland - operates out of the local town square.

But as regards Irish raiders, it’s generally considered that the reason that large parts of Western Scotland spoke Scots Gaelic is because the Ulster tribes of the Dalriada invaded and conquered it. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D%C3%A1l_Riata

Which makes for a very curious irony in that many of unionists that are descended from the later Ulster Plantation may well have blood connections going back to Ulster, making them more ‘Irish’ than some of the natives.

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well, Kilcash, you may be right about that.

but I’m a couple hundred miles inland. Don’t know if its that we’re far from God, or just far from fish

but a busy fish stall in the town square on a Friday…sure does sound like the tradition is alive and well over where you are

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"St. Pat invented Guinness and was accordingly and justifiably made a Saint."
Is that the 1% that isn’t bullcrap?

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Yes Ben, …..I swear that that’s as true as I’m riding this bicycle !

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