Paddy League

Paddy League

I have been practicing my DADGAD backup, playing along with Dark of the Moon by Grey Larsen/Paddy League. I really like Paddy’s backup approach. Him and I are close to the same age, and hearing someone play like that, especially at his age, is inspiring.

I had the chance to see him and Laura Risk in Tallahassee, FL a while ago. They put on a great show, Paddy alternating between bodhran and guitar. I got to talk to him for a few mintues after the show and he seemed like a really nice guy.

Hopefully we will see some more cd’s from him and Grey.



anton

Posted by .

Re: Paddy League

That’s pretty audacious, just pure name-dropping without even bothering to create a thread subject to hang it on!
I take my hat off to you sir!

Re: Paddy League

Hey, the point of the subject was the name drop! *grin* Actually, Paddy IS a really nice guy, and he knows some great stories. Have a chat with him if you ever get the chance. ;)

Re: Paddy League

I didnt intend on name dropping when i created the post. I had just been practicing alot to his playing and am just amazed at what a player he is, especially for his age. I was actually hopeing someone might chime in with more about him, his musical background, etc. There was a site, www.larsenandleague.com, but that apparently has been taken down.

anton

Posted by .

Re: Paddy League

C’mon guys, I know Anton and he’s not trying to impress anyone with a name drop - he just wants to chat about Paddy League.

Yes, the Larsen and League site is no longer. I believe that the reason he and Grey are no longer playing together all the time is that Paddy decided to go back to college. I’m not 100% sure about that, but Steve mentioned it to me a while back.

Paddy is an amazing, multi-talented fellow (he even plays the ud!), and is also a really nice, down-to-earth and open minded person. I really enjoy listening to Grey and Paddy’s CDs because of the sensitive musical dialogue that is present in every track. They are both such outstanding musicians.

Lynnsey

Re: Paddy League

Ah, sorry guys, but that was something of a private-ish, publicky joke — Mark/Dow is actually who Mark/Ottery was tweaking there, I’m sure, and not actually Anton. But Paddy is indeed a lovely player and a lovely person.

Re: Paddy League

Zeens from your last few words it’s obvious you want us to ask: "how do you know him, is he one of your friends?"… jeez I can cause trouble and misunderstandings these days without even posting on a thread! I can be irritating without actually having to be here 😀 So have I made everyone paranoid yet about their daily cringeworthy namedropping or do we have to take drastic action to stamp out the problem for good? Maybe Jeremy should create a "namedrop box" here on the yellaboard. It would work like a swearbox - for every "drop" you have to donate a certain amount to charity. The more blatant your drop the more you have to donate. This thread’s gonna have cost yuz all a fortune by the time it goes over the page 🙂

Re: Paddy League

LOL — no, you’re funny when you’re causing trouble without being here, you’re only irritating when you actually post. *smirk*

Re: Paddy League

I’ll just have to post more then eh? *grin*

Re: Paddy League

Oh, definitely. hehehe

Re: Paddy League

Here is some investigative reporting I did—first published on the cittern list after Zoukfest in 2001.

Dateline: August 17, 2001. Boy Musician, Paddy League, is Actually a 75-year-old Man!

Ever since Zoukfest 1998, everyone, including this reporter, has been wondering how Paddy League has become such an accomplished musician at such an early age. Not only could he play bodhran and drums from many countries as a seasoned professional, he also played banjo, mandolin, guitar, concertina, and other instruments. The Zoukfest students, many of whom were older and had been striving for years to play only one instrument, could only look on in awe.

Although he was at the age when people can play music all night long and look fresh the next day, League frequently left sessions early. He would arrive at class late—tired—and, if no one was watching him, he seemed slightly stooped. With suspicion gnawing at me, I waited. My chance came when League fell asleep on a sofa in the lobby of the Sagebrush conference center. Quietly, so as not to disturb him, I checked a strange bulge in his oversized bodhran case. The case had a cleverly hidden compartment—filled with Geritol, Viagra, and a medicine bottle filled with liquid, but mysteriously, lacking label.

Suddenly awakened, and confronted with the evidence, League confessed and told his bizarre story. He was actually born in 1926, and while still a baby he was stolen by gypsies. The head of the gypsy band, an aspiring bouzouki player with no talent, decided to live out his failed musical ambitions in this young child. First, using a secret formula, known only to certain gypsy leaders, League was given a mixture of herbs, powders, and other naturally occurring substances that retard the aging process. The child was then subjected to a grueling regimen of musical study. Forced to do nothing but play music for up to 14 hours a day, he would be instructed by a master musician, who was blindfolded and brought to the gypsy hideout deep in the Carpathian Mountains. Once he mastered an instrument, a new musical master from another country would be brought in.

For year after year after year he practiced. The gypsy chief did not live to see his prodigy go forth, because he died unexpectedly while playing his bouzouki, when the D string broke, lashed back at his head, and pierced his skull and his brain. Oddly, Paddy had warned him of this danger, recognizing that the string was old and was of a much too large a gauge for a D string. The chief’s son continued his father’s work and young Paddy blossomed as a musician, while he grew steadily older, yet stayed looking quite young. Besides music, his only diversion was to mimic the accents of his many teachers.

Only a few short years ago, Paddy League escaped from the gypsies and made his way to the United States. Free at last, he soon realized that he had no choice but to take up the profession of musician. It was all he knew. While he was able to take a supply of the gypsy anti-aging liquid with him, its effects are weakening and his supply is running low. But he has hope, and that is why he has specialized in Irish music in recent years. For, while he lay awake at night in the Carpathian Mountains, he overheard the gypsies speaking. There is one who knows the secret. The only one who can keep Paddy League young. There is one who has come before and is just like him. And Paddy goes from Irish festival to Irish festival seeking him out. He knows you are out there, and he will find you. Won’t he, SEAMUS EGAN?!

© John T. Conoboy

Re: Paddy League

LOL — nice, John, nice. Please don’t tell me what nefarious need he has for the Viagra, I simply don’t care to know… ;)

Re: Paddy League

Paddy is an excellent musician. He started out as a jazz percussionist. I think his bodhran playing is truly brilliant. He has an incredible understanding of music and rhythm. His playing lifts the music and never gets in the way or becomes overpowering. I highly recommend his bodhran instruction book and tape—not only for would be drummers, but for anyone who wants to play accompaniment on Irish music. If everyone who wanted to play bodhran played like Paddy, we would not hate them anymore.