Slip Jig vs Hop Jig

Slip Jig vs Hop Jig

I’m curious. Are they the same thing?

Re: Slip Jig vs Hop Jig

No.

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Re: Slip Jig vs Hop Jig

They are exactly as different(or similar) as single jig and double jig. Hop jig is the 9/8 equivalent of slide or single jig, while slip jig is the 9/8 equivalent of a double jig.

Hop jig = Butterfly or Fig for a Kiss
Slip jig = Kid on the Mountain.

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Re: Slip Jig vs Hop Jig

You can start with this comment and read to the end and hopefully it makes sense.
https://thesession.org/discussions/2748#comment54350

If it does make sense that’s grand. Then if you go back up the thread to Zina Lee’s comments about dance (especially hop jigs) it gives the terms a whole other layer. Great discussion! There’s more in the mustard too.

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Re: Slip Jig vs Hop Jig

Any other tune types that I don’t know about? So far I have Reels, Hornpipes, Jigs, Slides, Hop Jigs, Slip Jigs, Barndances, Highland Flings, Strathspeys, Schottisches, Polkas, Marches, Airs, Waltzes, and Mazurkas.

Re: Slip Jig vs Hop Jig

Set Dances. O’Carolan pieces.

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Re: Slip Jig vs Hop Jig

Darn it. Any others, or does that about cover it?

Re: Slides vs Single Jigs

Is there a difference between Slides and Single Jigs?

Re: Slip Jig vs Hop Jig

[Kellie]:
> Darn it. Any others, or does that about cover it?

Quadrilles; There’s one on a Micho Russell album.

Re: Slip Jig vs Hop Jig

Here are some more that I’ve run across in the "R:" header of abc notation.
Two-step, Swedish Walking Tune, Shetland Reel, Quickstep, Pipe March, Pibroch, Hymn, Can-can, Folk.
Obviously, abc notation covers a lot of territory not unique to trad.

Re: Slip Jig vs Hop Jig

Single jigs are notated in 6/8; slides are notated in 12/8. So one part of a slide with repeats is only 8 bars, while for a single jig it’s 16. Furthermore, slides are usually played quite fast, and where you’ll find a short-short-short "jig pattern" in a single jig (I’m assuming you’re familiar with the difference between a jig pattern and a triplet; if not let me know), you’ll find straight triplets in a slide. A slide sounds a little like a cross between a hornpipe/fling, a polka and a jig - it has similarities to all of these. By the way, Alan Ng on his site irishtune.info makes the point that the single jig is not as related rhythmically to the double jig as we tend to think. Instead it’s more related to the hornpipe and fling, what with those swung eighth notes in the latter two forms. Interesting stuff.

Re: Slip Jig vs Hop Jig

‘Germans’ - I think they are the Donegal version of a schottische, someone correct me if I’m wrong

Re: Slip Jig vs Hop Jig

" ‘Germans’ - I think they are the Donegal version of a schottische"
As far as i know in the 19th century german brass band music was popular in northern ireland. So that’s were the ‘Germans’ came from. And the schottische in scandanavia derives from the ‘Rheinlaender’, a southern german tune type. But i don’t know if this is also true for the schottische in ireland.

Re: Slip Jig vs Hop Jig

"(I’m assuming you’re familiar with the difference between a jig pattern and a triplet; if not let me know)"

I don’t actually. What is the difference?

Edit: Thinking about it, I might have some idea, but I’m not 100%.

Re: Slip Jig vs Hop Jig

Also what’s a Treble Jig?

Re: Slip Jig vs Hop Jig

I’m going to address those questions in reverse order, because it’s easier. First, a treble jig is nothing more than a double jig. That’s it. The term is used by dancers to refer to a normal double jig as opposed to a heavy jig. A heavy jig is a jig danced in hard shoes, played quite slow and using straight triplets instead of jig patterns.

Speaking of which, in ITM (though not necessarily in other traditions - Scottish, Cape Breton, etc.), a jig pattern is often said to be played "dotted". Like a triplet, it involves three notes, but with a heavy emphasis on the first. The distribution of the notes is consequently uneven, where the first note is the longest, the second is the shortest, and the third is somewhere in the middle. Think dotted eighth note, sixteenth note, eighth note. That’s how it sounds even if it’s never ever written as such. Think of the word "jiggity", it’s said sort of unevenly, with the third syllable longer than the second.

The thing about single jigs is that many, but *not* all, three beat groups (two per measure) are played long-short, long-short, instead of the short-short-short of double jigs (keep in mind, still not a triplet). However, those times when the long-short pattern is broken, it’s three short notes in that uneven jig pattern. In a slide, by contrast, when the long-short sequences are broken, those three short notes are a straight triplet (equal emphasis on every note), not a jig pattern.

The same logic applies to the slip jig vs. the hop jig. The slip jig is played with the short-short-short jig patterns. The hop jig has more of an emphasis on the long-short pairs, but when a three-note group does occur, it’s a jig pattern, not a triplet.

Hope that helps you somewhat.

Re: Slip Jig vs Hop Jig

I usually see Hop Jigs notated in 3/4 time, typically 1 crotchet and 4 quavers per bar