Good tunes to master ornamentation

Good tunes to master ornamentation

Hi everybody! I decided it’s time for me to start doing ornamentation. But It sounds not nice so far. It sounds like ‘shut up asap’ ha-ha

What tunes are good to practice ornamentation? I think ones with lots of double notes and long notes will do.

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Re: Good tunes to master ornamentation

Well, which ornamentations are you thinking about? What instrument?

Triplets:
Brenda Stubberts
Drunken Landlady
Maple Leaf

Re: Good tunes to master ornamentation

If you want to get a grip on rolls on the fiddle the I always warm up with the Kid on the mountain slip jig where you can start the tune with a roll on the E followed by a roll on the F# and then one on the G.

Re: Good tunes to master ornamentation

From your profile Tat, I see you are a tin whistle player. Tunes where rolls are a big part of the melody include The Kid on the Mountain (as Geoff points out) and the jigs Out on the Ocean and Morrison’s. For reels, give The Galway Rambler a try.

Re: Good tunes to master ornamentation

Practicing ornaments in isolation and not in context of tunes could lead to mastering the technique faster.

The most useful ornaments IMO are cuts and bounces. Those two open rolls for you.

On flutes and whistles a cut of lower-than-previous note often requires special fingering. So, you might play pairs of notes, second note cut, and find the best fingering for each case. Breath pulse on a cut note makes it shine.

Two advices on how to find the ‘right’ note to ornament: (i) listen what experienced players do; (ii) use ornaments to establish and support rhythm, not just as an embellishment. Those ‘ornaments’ are more like fingered articulations.

IMHO the best starting point to incorporate cuts and other stuff into your playing is jig. Say, Willy Coleman’s or Paddy Clancy’s.

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Re: Good tunes to master ornamentation

Kiss The Maid Behind The Barrel is a good tune for the quaver + long roll (or quaver + quaver + short roll, if you prefer) sequence that is very typical of reels. The Fermoy Lasses is another exmple that comes to mind.

For reels with ‘on-the-beat’ long rolls, you could look at The Earl’s Chair or The Wind That Shakes the Barley.
Jigs like Morrison’s, Donnybrook Fair and The Cliffs of Moher (and The Kid On The Mountain, as already suggested) are also good for long rolls.

Short rolls can be fitted into just about any tune, but their execution is, I think, somewhat tricker and their placement less obvious (and less essential).

The Ship In Full Sail and The Lilting Banshee could be good tunes for practising using cut and taps to separate notes of the same pitch.

Re: Good tunes to master ornamentation

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eIiU6HKs570


I think from learning this tune and trying to copy the very rich ornamentation, you can learn a lot!
The third part is nice for practicing fast tonguing, as well as the fifth one, sixth parts is especially nice, for getting the rolls on the low d.
I believe this tune is very prominent among pipers -from my experience, the great piping tunes often translate very well to the flute and whistle, especially if you want to play with a lot ornamentation!

good luck with that, the pitch is not on 440Hz unfortunately!

Re: Good tunes to master ornamentation

June McCormack has a book, still available, called Fliuit which focuses on embedding ornamentation within the tunes (in the book). The accompanying CD also contains June playing isolated cuts, taps, bounces, rolls etc. It is my bible for the correct playing of ornamentation.