New book on Sligo Fiddling

New book on Sligo Fiddling

A new book of Sligo Fiddling called "Fiddlers of Sligo" has just been launched by accordion player Daithí Gormley and fiddler Oisin MacDiarmada. It contains 22 remarkable Sligo fiddlers including Michael Coleman, James Morrison and Paddy Killoran, Joe O’Dowd, Fred Finn, John Joe Gardiner and some rarely heard but equally virtuosic Fiddlers too such as Tommy Flynn, Michael Joe McDonagh and Kathleen Harrington.

The book includes transcriptions of 52 tunes from the recorded repertoire of these players, along with extensive commentary about the Sligo fiddle style and it’s exponents.

Available from http://sligofiddle.bigcartel.com/

Re: New book on Sligo Fiddling

It looks interesting, but it is a shame that Oisin didn’t see fit to include the bowings.

Re: New book on Sligo Fiddling

Is there a full list of fiddlers included?

Furthermore, I love oisens fiddle but it always comes across as mainstream and not very sligo-ish at all.

Which brings back the argument is there such a thing as Sligo fiddling, ID say yes there is.

Bowing patterns are a hallmark of sligo fiddling so more power to cheekys elbow

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Re: New book on Sligo Fiddling

https://youtu.be/e8SKS7OUOfA


Don’t get me wrong, his roots are in the right place but recent things have sounded mainstream. I’m a damned fool excuse me my elbow is all wound up

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Re: New book on Sligo Fiddling

This is very laid back playing in the videos. Michael Coleman’s playing always seems very urgent and unsettling. Is that just personal differences or is the "knocking you off-balance" feeling I get from Michael Coleman part of the Sligo style? I have always assumed it was - because Coleman’s the only Sligo fiddler I’ve really listened to.

Re: New book on Sligo Fiddling

//It looks interesting, but it is a shame that Oisin didn’t see fit to include the bowings.//

@Cheeky, indeed. I was just looking at Mrs Kenny’s Barndance, and bar #2 starts with a triplet A/G#/A ,
and I wondered if he did that in a single bow, crossing strings, or on a single string, fingering 4/3/4.

"Make it your own", they say :)

Re: New book on Sligo Fiddling

4/3/4
]]] [[[
Would be more like;
4443434 4
]]] [[[

But I never mastered it and fell into ‘bad habits’ like easier instruments for post traumatic reel disorders. The Sligo fellas with Sligo Bibles will be showing up at my door step with silicon glasses.

But you wouldn’t use that posh exuberance with a barn dance unless you been dropped off the rafters one to many

Chop your way back and forth on that 3 4 bit and scratch that vinyl, cause I’m a damned fool

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Re: New book on Sligo Fiddling

I’ll buy a copy. As to the bowing, transcribing solo performance is a fairly easy process with today’s technological advantages, at least as far as the pitches and values of the notes. Bowing transcription requires a great deal more experience and study.

Re: New book on Sligo Fiddling

@Beid - what notes would he be playing with 4443434 4 ?

Or is this a joke? :)

Re: New book on Sligo Fiddling

"This is very laid back playing in the videos. Michael Coleman’s playing always seems very urgent and unsettling. Is that just personal differences or is the "knocking you off-balance" feeling I get from Michael Coleman part of the Sligo style? I have always assumed it was - because Coleman’s the only Sligo fiddler I’ve really listened to."

Oisin heard you and thus made this video, Gallopede….

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ONz4YT3G0wo


Part of a pretty good series of four vids, but I would have liked some more detailed questioning by Steve Wickham, who moderates.

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Re: New book on Sligo Fiddling

Wow indeed! Thankyou for that Ergo. It’s the changes of rhythm in Coleman’s playing which I find unbalancing. There’s an unexpected stop to me when the rhythm changes - as if he’d hit a wave.

Re: New book on Sligo Fiddling

"It’s the changes of rhythm in Coleman’s playing which I find unbalancing. There’s an unexpected stop to me when the rhythm changes - as if he’d hit a wave."


I’m always really suspicious of those old recordings. Clearly Coleman could play but I really doubt those recordings do much more than give a flavour of what he was capable of. They sound really uptight and off one moment and pure genius the next to me.

Re: New book on Sligo Fiddling

The old way of recording must have been difficult circumstances in which to play but it sounds as if Coleman was exactly the sort of person who would have been up to it.