White goods and traditional Irish music

White goods and traditional Irish music

I have an LG washing machine in the house. Whenever you turn on the power it plays a little nine note jingle. Those nine notes, in little bursts of threes, are the same as those at the beginning of The Scotsman Over The Border. Does anyone else have any domestic appliances that play parts of a tune? Like a vacuum cleaner that plays the first four bars of The Pipe On The Hob? And if so could we get together for a session and some housework?

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And yes, I realize it would be more appropriate if the LG played The Irish Washerwoman. But it doesn’t.

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I have a stove that I use to Boil The Breakfast Early, if that’s of any help?

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My washer and dryer both play "the trout" when they are done. Not Irish but charming all the same.

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My washer and dryer play a complete A part melody that fits jig rhythm very well, so I wrote a B part to match. At the suggestion of a friend, the name of it is now "The Lucky Goldstar Jig". Maybe I’ll post it.

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My washing machine’s jingle is an E maj arpeggio, possible but not too flute friendly… I must find a way to turn it off.

My razor is in Bb.. still not flute friendly nor white;
https://youtu.be/k2ux53TST5Q

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Can you play Strop The Razor on that thing Bogtrumpet?

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There’s a video of a female bluegrass player doing laundry. One of the machines drones away in A and is rhythmic enough that she manages to practice Dorian scales atop it.

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Yes, Sgt Fox; the flute drone isn’t available in white, just in Braun…

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I’m still waiting for the inevitable comment about how badly a vacuum plays notes…

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Come to think of it, I’d swear my washing machine plays the pickups and first note of O’Carolan’s Concerto (and has pretty decent tone too)

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Oh touche Bogtrumpet.

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I was in China in an elevator and a noticed that their elevator music is the air/song Down by the Sally GArdens

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our granddaughter was playing Super Mario Brothers the other day and I swear there was a mutated version of the Congress Reel on the soundtrack…………..

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Microsoft has always had a little jingle for their Windows boot-up. For Windows 11, I vote for the first eight notes of The Road To Lisdoonvarna.

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Not The Dusty Windows then Ailin?

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Good thought. How about Green Gates or Golden Keyboard?

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I’m in The States and I’ve never heard of a washing machine playing a jingle. Is it an Irish thing?

We do have Ice Cream Trucks that roam the neighborhoods playing jingles and one plays the Highland pipe march The Barren Rocks Of Aden for some unknown reason.

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It’s not an unknown reason ,it’s to entice the kids to spend their parents hard earned cash !

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Mains electricity in most places oscillates at 50Hz, which translates to a slightly sharp G (but significantly so - about 35 cents, or just over 1/3 of a semitone if my calculations are correct. Concert pitch G in the same register would be 49Hz). Appliances with motors or vibrating parts (such as the glass washer in a pub) can therefore provide a convenient, but somewhat out of tune, drone in G - you just need to be prepared to tune a bit sharp, which is problematic if there are non-tunable instruments present, such as accordions and concertinas.

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"It’s not an unknown reason ,it’s to entice the kids to spend their parents hard earned cash !"

Many adults are just large kids. Just look at clothing trends and other societal priorities. 40 is the new 15.

(Not that I’m much of an exception. I went to opening day of the latest Star Wars movie. Without guilt, I might add.)

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So far this thread appears to be about appliances with built-in tunes. Has anyone encountered appliances that pick up radio signals? I’ve heard of people receiving broadcasts through their fillings and suchlike. I am totally serious about this. Let’s face it, not so long ago you could make a crystal set based on an enamelled razor blade, or even a freshly cut potato (Irish Radio?) or get a flicker of light from a torch bulb powered by a couple of lemons.

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Yes, and I bite the head off the chocolate bunny at Easter while screaming "Stop Staring At Me." Goodnight to all.

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Ear Worms diddly diddly…………. And my feet Hum…..

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I have an ancient washing machine that just makes a few squeaky noises and then shuts up. No dishwasher noises either - I’m the dishwasher, in a tough old old sink. However , because the electricity here in the very north-east of England is on an ancient key meter - now that makes a really wierd sound. It’s a sort of quiet persisistent sound of the slowly stranged dead.

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What I don’t understand is why anyone would imagine that a mid-19th century Highland military tune should entice 21st century American kids to do anything.

Why not the Barney theme? Or a tune from any other children’s show, or some cartoon? It’s strange.

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Maybe it comes from the words sometimes sung to that:
Mumma will you buy for me will you buy for me will you buy for me
Momma will you buy for me will you buy me a banana (split?)
Oh yes my son I’ll buy you one… etc.

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"Mains electricity in most places oscillates at 50Hz"

It’s actually either 50Hz or 60Hz (60 is the norm in the Americas and some of Asia…), and the latter is conveniently the exact pitch of my B flat set’s bass drone.

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