Rudall & Rose style flute makers

Rudall & Rose style flute makers

I am looking to upgrade from my current Delrin flute as I have gotten more confident that I will keep pursuing trad flute in the future.
I looked around a few makers, Martin Doyle, Eamonn Cotter, Hammy Hamilton, for example, and only found they are more Pratten inspired. Is that correct?
If yes, are their makers that do R&R styled too?
Part of the reason I’m more into those is the ability to twist the flute body suited to one’s hands.

Re: Rudall & Rose style flute makers

You should have many choices as many fluthiers make R&R inspired flutes.

From what I’ve seen in looking around, most modern R&R flutes are medium or medium-large holed, unless described otherwise. You need to pay attention to the description or inquire directly to the maker. The "nicholson" descriptor usually means a larger-holed R&R flute.

My hands aren’t that large, and I’ve not found the twist is that important.

Re: Rudall & Rose style flute makers

Look up Glenn Watson who is based in Galway.

Re: Rudall & Rose style flute makers

You might look at the Irish Flute Store website. There is an olive wood Bleazey Rudall for sale.

Re: Rudall & Rose style flute makers

Since you’re in the US, you might prefer US-based makers. Most makers offer several models.

The Olwell’s make three styles, which they call their Rudall, Nicholson, and Pratten, and they’re basically small-bore & -hole, medium, and large respectively. They’re not super closely matched to historic instruments, but I don’t think the Olwell’s Nicholson model is Rudall based.

John Gallagher makes Rudall & Rose style flutes that are a closer match to historic instruments. He makes one that’s copied after a small-holed Rudall & Rose, and another that’s copied after a large-holed one (as far as I know, the bores are actually similar on these), and he also makes ones copied after a Pratten.

I own one of John’s large-holed Rudall models, and love it, but I also had a great chance to play all three styles last year, and they’re not as different as you might expect. In both makers’ cases, all of their flute styles play somewhat similarly, which in my opinion is due in large part to their embouchure styles.

There are other makers in the US that I don’t know as well - Copley&Boegli and Brian Byrne, for example. The latter especially I think is known for his Rudall & Rose style flutes. I don’t know any of the details of what they’re copied after, but I think it’s also a larger-holed/bored one.

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Re: Rudall & Rose style flute makers

What about Gilles Lehart or Stephane Morvan? Both make a mix between R&R and Pratten which are great. Gilles Lehart makes great flutes (I mean, really great) with a short waiting time and a good price.

Morvan makes also great flutes but they are more expensive and waiting times are bigger.

Re: Rudall & Rose style flute makers

You should be able to find plenty of makers doing Rudall-based flutes, tradguy. Indeed, I make three different Rudall-based models, plus a Prattens, plus my small-holed Grey Larsen Preferred model (inspired by small-holed 19th century American flutes). Plus a choice of embouchure shapes. That’s how seriously I take variety!

But the next question becomes "Whose Rudall-based flute should I get?". The very best answer to that question is to try out as many as you possibly can before committing. Flutes, I am convinced, are highly personal instruments - what suits me might or might not suit you. Not surprising, given the extraordinary range of mouths you see out there!

Is there any way you could get to one of the festivals or summer camps where lots of flute players are likely to gather? Most players (in my experience) are happy to swap flutes for a tune or two in a session. You’ll soon know if a flute has promise or has some characteristic you really don’t like.

Re: Rudall & Rose style flute makers

Thanks Terry, and others for the reply.
@Terry, are you aware of such festivals in the USA? I’d definitely be willing to travel if not prohibitively expensive!

Re: Rudall & Rose style flute makers

Hi tradguy et al.

I’m not very up on musical events in the US, so others should feel free to chip in. Back in 2002, I did enjoy a few days at Irish Week in East Durham in the Catskill Mountains, New York state. And also (not too far from the US depending where you are) Boxwood - the Festival of the Wooden Flute - in Lunenberg, Nova Scotia. Google those for a start, and "Irish flute classes US".

Others?

Re: Rudall & Rose style flute makers

As mentioned above, you have to do your due diligence when buying a flute from a maker outwith the USA because of CITES regulations- a CITES certificate is required to import items made of certain woods including African Blackwood/Grenadilla.

Re: Rudall & Rose style flute makers

As Terry says the best thing is to attend the larger Irish music gatherings and meet up with fluteplayers, who as Terry says are usually happy to let you try their flutes.

One thing is to look for a Tionol to attend. Yes it will be mostly uilleann pipers, but players of other instruments are usually in attendance as well.

Re: Rudall & Rose style flute makers

From your profile, it looks like you’re in Austin, TX. There are some very good players in the area (Jonathan Milton, James Hamilton), and you’re not far from the O’Flaherty Irish Music Retreat (south of Dallas in Oct) where you can meet many flute players.

The Catskills Irish Arts Week is the best, in my opinion. Often flute makers go, too.

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