How is a two step different from a jig?

How is a two step different from a jig?

I’m confused how is a two step different from a jig - is it a certain type of jig - single/dougle jig- or is it even a march?

Is this the same in Scottish as well as Irish

From an experienced English player who has little or no idea about Irish/Scottish.
Thx.

Re: How is a two step different from a jig?

Are you talking about dances or tunes used for those dances?
In Scotland, two-steps, as (couples) dances, are typically 16 bars of 6/8 (or 32 beats) in length. The only ones I’ve come across regularly are the Military Two-step, the Britannia Two-step and the BostonTwo-step. Jigs are more likely to be set dances (four or more couples) and typically 32 bars or more in length (like the Flying Scotsman, the Riverside or Strip the Willow).
Two-steps are often danced to 6/8 pipe marches. But there are also tunes called two-steps which fit the dances perfectly. Two-steps, as tunes, typically have 16 bar parts. Think of a normal jig but instead of doing it the same twice the first 8 bars ends on the dominant and the second ends on the tonic. A good example is Ronald Cooper which I posted here some years ago. Two-steps tend to have what the Irish might call a single jig feel, which I think means it has more crotchets and dotted crotchets than you would expect in double jig.

Re: How is a two step different from a jig?

As regards the "tune", two steps usually follow a particular format.

A (twice), B(Twice), A(once) C(twice) A(twice) or similar although this may vary.

As Donald says, they have a different feel although I’m not sure how to describe that in technical terms. As Donald says, there are more likely to be longer notes e.g. crotchets and dotted crotchets and there also seems to be more "rise and fall" in the direction of the tune.
I’m sure someone else can explain things better. 🙂

Re: How is a two step different from a jig?

I may be completely wrong here, but….
My understanding is that Two Steps are basically Scottish and Shetland. There are lots of tunes you could play either as a jig or a two-step, the difference being that when it’s a two-step the first of each group of three is slightly longer and stronger than in a jig. This gives quite a strong march-like feel.

As it happens, here’s a set starting with the Boston Two-Step…..
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j9lDmXK3PMY

Re: How is a two step different from a jig?

I remember taking a (Scottish) tune to a session, which had "jig" in the title. The tune had been written for dancing.
However, one of my esteemed colleagues immediately said on hearing it "Ah, now that’s a two-step, not a jig", although written in 6/8 time. To him, it was the way it sounded, and as Donald and Johnny have suggested, it may well be the use of dotted crotchets and crotchet/quaver combinations predominating: there are hardly any bars in this tune that have 6 quavers to the bar, and the few that there are tend to be in the penultimate bar in each phrase. (Whereas in many jigs, nearly every bar has the full six quavers.)