Rules

Rules

Do you know if there are any standards or rules for cuts, taps, slides…..

Thanks for yours light 🙂

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Re: Rules

Why yes, yes I do!

Re: Rules

You play whistle, correct? There aren’t really “rules” for cuts, taps, and slides, as different players approach cuts and taps in their own ways. You might want to check out Steve Jones’ Tin Whistle pages at https://www.rogermillington.com/siamsa/brosteve/twiddlybits1.html for a discussion of cuts, taps, and slides. Sean Cunningham (WhistleTutor) has great youtube lessons going into these topics, too -- in fact, his most recent video is called “Ornaments: what, where, and why.” https://youtu.be/iSLoRGgIRV4


I’m newish to whistle. I really like double-note cuts as Mary Bergin would call them-- separating two of the same note with a cut. I probably use them too much, and find they slow me down somewhat. I’m working on more judicious use of tonguing for a more rhythmic style (see the jig tonguing discussion at https://www.rogermillington.com/siamsa/brosteve/jigsI.html).

Re: Rules

A good rule of thumb is, whenever you are tempted to use your tongue to articulate a note or series of notes (such as a triplet), substitute an ornament and see if it improves the flow, the rhythm or your take on the tune.

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Re: Rules

I would call them practices or norms rather than “rules”.

If you listen to thousands of jigs and reels played by dozens, hundreds, of different players the norms followed by the bulk of the players will become clear.

Whenever someone boils these norms down to a set of written rules there’s a storm of protest. “But so-and-so doesn’t do that!” These people miss the point that the issue is the norms followed by the bulk of the practitioners. Of course there will always be exceptions to the “rules”.

Given that, yes, possibly due to the influence of piping ITM whistleplayers and fluteplayers tend to do with their fingers several things that “classical” recorder and flute players do with the airstream, namely much of their articulation, and oftentimes much or all of their notebending and vibrato.

In the whistle style I most commonly hear even though there might be quite a bit of tonguing, the tonguing is being used to accentuate a fundamentally legato style (as compared to, say, recorder playing).

Re: Rules

About “slides” a slide is a type of tune.

Re: Rules

thank you Richard for your videos
About the second on is there any rules for the differents place where to use thes different ornementations ?

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