The Gobby-O

The Gobby-O

Has anyone got a good origin for the name of this Jig. Also known as Jefferson and Liberty in the States

Re: The Gobby-O

These lyrics are from The Tyneside Songster (1825) fit the tune. They suggest "gobby" is a variant of "gob" or mouth, with O appended to make it scan. The humorous dialect song describes outlandishly dressed dandies having a swell time at the local dance.

There was Sam, O zouns!
Wiv’s pantaloons,
An’ gravat* up owre his gobby, O;
An’ Willie, thou,
Wi’ thee jacket blue,
Thou was the varry bobby, O

*cravat

Here is a comic depiction of a dandy of the period of the song, wearing trendy pantaloons (rather than his father’s knee breeches) and a cravat nearly up over his gob. http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/artwork/89762

I’m not sure how old the Tyneside lyrics are (and I’m not going to look because I’m on my phone) but they could be late 18th century and contemporary with the early appearances of the tune (and those pantaloons).

The Jefferson and Lyrics are aggressively political, and in my humble opinion, are due for a revival.

Re: The Gobby-O

* that would be Jefferson and Liberty lyrics, it would.

BTW, the original setting was to a different tune not related to The Gobby-O. A solid march, but not a catchy tune.
https://www.loc.gov/item/2015562052/

When my band does a colonial and frontier America program, we like to medley The Rakes of Clonmel with The Gobby-O.
https://thesession.org/tunes/1130

Re: The Gobby-O

Gob in Hiberno English is loosely a mouth as in ‘Shut yer gob’. In Irish, it means a beak of a bird literally but often occurs for points and small headlands along the coast. Might be used too to describe a person with a beaked or hooked nose.

Posted .

Re: The Gobby-O

I don’t like this question!

Posted by .

Re: The Gobby-O

Grrrr!

Posted by .

Re: The Gobby-O

But you’ve got your own choon! Now all you need is some pantaloons…

Posted by .

Re: The Gobby-O

This is a really great jig. Who else pairs it with The Dancing Master? or even Rakes of Kildare?
Further suggestions please.

Re: The Gobby-O

Thanks Tracie that looks promising and the scansion fits the tune. My first thought, on hearing it, was it sounded like the Tyneside tune for ‘The Row Between the Cages’ which is in 4:4 and tells of a battle between an old and new fangled pit cage .
It makes a great Rapper dance tune too. Bryony Griffith has it on her latest CD ‘Hover"
It also goes as a jaunty march or even strathspey and would make a good fife and drum tune

Re: The Gobby-O

We do it with The Lilting Banshee.