Moody hornpipes anyone?

Moody hornpipes anyone?

Just listening to Caislean An Oir on a Matt Molloy, what a lovely tune that I’ve not heard played often.

Any other lovely moody hornpipes you can think of? I like the change of pace from endless reels.

Re: Moody hornpipes anyone?

These days my favourites are Galway Bay, Johnny Cope, Nellie Your Favour I’m Afraid I’ll Not Gain, The Queen of the West (and MacDara O’Raghallaigh’s unforgettable setting), The Plane of the Plank and Paddy Connelly’s Stack Of Barley (this one isn’t really a classic though, so I rarely play it in session, but I hope you’ll find it as lovely as I do).

Re: Moody hornpipes anyone?

minor version of Peacocks Feather by Frankie Gavin/Alec Finn [RIP]
Plains of Boyle - Rights of Man - its an old chestnut but I also like Chief O’ Neill’s!

Re: Moody hornpipes anyone?

Two more hornpipes composed by Junior Crehan qualify:
The Hills of Coore and
Her Lovely Hair was Flowing Down Her Back

Re: Moody hornpipes anyone?

Poll Ha’penny, either version, but particularly the one also called "Hawk’s Hornpipe". Glorious.

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I like Chief O’Neill’s Favorite. Even though it’s in Dmajor it’s got that nice F natural going on in the B part. Also a C natural and C# in the same measure, at least the way I play it, although I’ve heard others play it differently.

Re: Moody hornpipes anyone?

yes that is how I play it and why I like it!

Re: Moody hornpipes anyone?

Sorry Christy, I somehow overlooked that you’d already mentioned it!

Re: Moody hornpipes anyone?

I really like the Humours of Tullycrine followed by the Peacock’s Feather, both in D minor.

Re: Moody hornpipes anyone?

Thomaston, no problem! I also like Bantry Bay but rarely play it - no sure if it counts as moody though I do like the way it dips in and out of E minor…………….

Re: Moody hornpipes anyone?

Some versions of "The First of May" are also quite nice in this regard.

Re: Moody hornpipes anyone?

In the Flute Foundations lesson series on the OAIM, Kirsten Allstaff plays and teaches a version of the Pride of Petravore which is truly moody. Very different from the Bothy Band’s version and very moving. Played slowly it is a tune to savour.

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Re: Moody hornpipes anyone?

There’s a different Blackbird that’s gorgeous, I’ll see if it’s in Tunes. (A Set Dance yes, but having a hornpipe lilt to it.)

On Highland pipes there’s a lovely hornpipe called Newmarket House which I never hear anyone play. I learned it at piping school in the early 1980s and haven’t heard it since.

Re: Moody hornpipes anyone?

No, the hornpipe Newmarket House isn’t in Tunes. If I knew ABC I could add it.

Re: Moody hornpipes anyone?

And there’s the Humours of Ballyconnell, the version in A minor which I’ve added in the discussion of the ordinary tune. I tried to add the A minor version as an alternate version but I’ve done something wrong in my clumsy attempt at ABC and it won’t recognise the accidentals I put in, which are critical to the tune. It’s not worth adding without all the accidentals.

Re: Moody hornpipes anyone?

Try "The Blessings of Silver!"

Re: Moody hornpipes anyone?

It is listed here as a hornpipe, and I have seen it called a pipe hornpipe; don’t know. But if it IS a hornpipe, ‘Jock Broon’s 70th’ is one of the moodiest, strangest ones I know. In a very good way. I love that tune.

Re: Moody hornpipes anyone?

Yup, I know it’s a pipe tune, and one of Gordon Duncan’s…. but, is it a hornpipe? And if so was it called a ‘pipe hornpipe’ simply because it was written by a piper? I haven’t noticed any other references ot a pipe hornpipe, but maybe I just haven’t noticed. I’ve also seen it called a slow reel.

Re: Moody hornpipes anyone?

Richard, according to the video data, the tunes are: Jock Broon’s 70th, Michael MacDonald’s, Stand Fast, Better Days, Caledonian Society of London, Shirley Bow of Aberfoyle, Stock Yer Chanter, Gilligan’s Singing

Re: Moody hornpipes anyone?

> is it a hornpipe?

Pipe bands tend to start a competition medley with a type of tune that falls somewhere between a march and a hornpipe. One would be hard put to it to describe what the distinguishing features are, but an insistent, driving rhythm and strong underlying chord sequence, often with quite slow changes, are common features.

They are often labelled hornpipes by default, more for want of a better word than anything else.

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Re: Moody hornpipes anyone?

Thanks Calum. Makes sense.

Re: Moody hornpipes anyone?

Gordons book has it categorized as a hornpipe [ top left of the page ]. Nevertheless, I would disagree with that.

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