How to do this triplet ?

How to do this triplet ?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oiqZouWVa_s


At 53 second mark he does triplet on b flat on the same note it sounds like before another rising triplet.

In my case I am using D whistle so the triplet is on high D. How do I get them to sound sharp and crisp? I tried by closing the back of the throat to stop the air flow and also putting tongue on the mouthpiece but neither sound anywhere near the speed they should be.

Is it just a matter of practice and which technique should I be using to get it sounding like he does it the throat or the tongue?

Re: How to do this triplet ?

And is he indeed doing the same note tripletted or have I heard it wrong and am barking up the wrong tree?

Re: How to do this triplet ?

sharp and crisp = practice ad nauseum

Re: How to do this triplet ?

I might just skip that ornament as it seems not that popular anyway and I am not really fond of it. I have only heard it in this tune.

Re: How to do this triplet ?

^of all the tunes I have tried to learn.

Re: How to do this triplet ?

Yes, it’s a tongued triplet. Plenty people do choose not to do them, though I think that’s a decision more honestly made after you *can* do them :p

To get the speed, try tonguing ta-ka-ta or du-gu-du, rather than trying to repeat the same motion with your tongue.

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Re: How to do this triplet ?

Useful technique thanks.

Hmm well I like the flowyness of whistle and mostly slur and the single note triplets seem to go against that somewhat. Maybe I am only rationalizing my not being able to do them though I dunno 🙂

Re: How to do this triplet ?

The fun thing about triplets is in accompanying dancers. The percussive triple tap of a dancer’s feet is a very distinct marker for Irish dance. When the ‘auld guys’ danced they sought to make every note and rhythmic element of the tune ‘tell’.

Re: How to do this triplet ?

I think he’s doing a Duddleledur triplet. Say "Duddleledur" really quick and it gets pretty close.

Re: How to do this triplet ?

It’s a standard technique on (non-trad) flute called "triple tonguing".

Most people use T for single tonguing, saying "tootootoo" if tonguing three notes in a row.

But when you need a triplet too fast for that you have to add a second letter, usually K.

So for a quick triplet you use T K T saying "tookootoo".

This video introduces it well, but she keeps it slow for instructional purposes. Of course the entire point of triple tonguing is speed.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VSxYJKJyTds


You can also think of it as D G D "doogoodoo" which is indentical in the matter of tongue positition.

Re: How to do this triplet ?

The other possible way to tongue a very fast triplet is to use flutter-tonguing, another standard (non-trad) flute technique.

If you can pronounce the "rolled" or "trilled" RR in Spanish you can do a flutter-tongued triplet.

Personally I find it much easier to flutter-tongue a tongued triplet on whistle than triple-tongue it.

Here’s a video showing how to flutter tongue on flute. It works the same on whistle.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PAT0kZ4sYOs

Re: How to do this triplet ?

She starts with flutter tonguing using (as you might expect!) the tongue, but later in the video she mentions doing flutter tonguing in the back of the throat. A misnomer, because it doesn’t involve the tongue. It’s called an uvular trill.

Here at 2:50 this linguist dude demonstrates it. Only difference is, he’s not blowing a whistle or flute while doing it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vzt0cXdUW3k&t=305s

Re: How to do this triplet ?

She? is this a gender is only a social construct thing?

Re: How to do this triplet ?

THose other 2 vids of the woman are useful tho ty.