Roosebeck Harps

Roosebeck Harps

Has anyone had any luck with these or can recommend them, or is this a giant mistake? I am looking at the 19-string Roosebeck Pixie harps. The price is right for me, especially since it is being purchased for a beginner who might not stick with it (my 8-yr-old, who has been taking piano for a while now.) That being said, even if she gives up, I have an interest in playing it (play fiddle now) and my 12-yr-old violinist would also play it.

Re: Roosebeck Harps

Run

Re: Roosebeck Harps

I recommend against it. While there are a fewvpeople who have lucked out and gotten playable instruments, they are in the minority. They are significantly cheaper than other harps for a reason — they’re poorly built by poorly paid workers who are not musical instrument makers. You usually don’t get a chance to try it before you buy it. They are difficult, sometimes impossible, to tune and keep in tune. They company tries to blame this on the strings, claiming that you’ll need to change them several times a year. Nope. Strings on small harps like these last for years. They break easily, sometimes arriving broken, and instrument makers and repairers won’t touch them. All this means that you’ll spend your time fighting the harp, growing more and more frustrated and discouraged, and never learn to play.

Someone above already recommended Harpsicles. I don’t know if you can get them where you live, but Argent Fox has decent inexpensive harps. Also, it may be possible to hire a harp, either through a teacher, a harp society, or a harp store (though I don’t know how far they would be for you)

Good luck on your harp journey..

Re: Roosebeck Harps

I have had only limited experience with a Pakistani (Roosebeck) harp so can’t comment directly, but in general, I’d advise a beginner to stay away from anything with less than 22 strings (ie Stoney End Brittany or Eve harps -which are both excellent in design and sound). But they’re also lap harps and in my experience, lap harps take some getting used to as you’re balancing the harp on your lap, or negotiating with a knee support (knee-bone) or strap or stool. For a beginner, that could be more frustrating than it’s worth! Go for a Dusty Strings 26, often for sale on various harp newsletters and websites. The key advantage there is that the harp has legs that attach to the base (or not, if you wish) so that it stands on the floor - your hands (and brain) are thus free to play!

Re: Roosebeck Harps

Thank you all. I am tying on my running shoes as we speak and skedaddling away from the roosebeck!