Session Wreckers

Re: Session Wreckers

This is a very difficult problem. The pub manager/owner is the boss
and as a session attendee you are just another customer with no
special rights. So is the session wrecker. The manager probably doesn’t
think the wrecker is doing anything wrong. The other customers may think an
extrovert with no self-awareness is great entertainment.

The wrecker at my (ex-) session seems to have Asperger’s or a similar problem.
After enduring for a while, I threw in the towel last year and stopped playing there.
If it stops being a fun recreation, what is the point of it?

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Cackled with laughter at Phantom Button’s suggested website (the first one). Not realising you are a session wrecker is quite sad and not easy to deal with. Whispered word in ear perhaps?

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"The pub manager/owner is the boss
and as a session attendee you are just another customer with no
special rights."

If the musicians are getting paid, he might be entitled to have some input as regards the standard of the music? Or he could stipulate that only a limited number of musicians are allowed to play. Some bar managers/landlords do that and restrict the music to one table and so on.

If it’s not a "paid session", I’m not sure that the "customer’s rights" argument follows either. After all, if you were playing a game of darts, dominoes, pool, having a meal, or even just a simple conversation, you would expect random punters to "but in" or join you without permission and cause general disruption. You would be quite entitled to complain to the management then, surely?
So a few friends getting together to play a few tunes should really be a similar scenario, I’d have thought.

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It doesn’t have to be a paid session to have designated hosts by the pub management who have the authority to deal with this sort of thing. Two of us at our long term local weekly session have the backing of the pub to deal with any issue in our session as required. “Session wreckers” are dealt with quickly and usually humanely.

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Hey, Mike, do you use a captive bolt pistol or just inject a heavy dose of barbiturates? : )

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I like the captive bolt pistol myself. It’s very dramatic and sends a message.

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A water cannon is a little drastic even for dispersing the bodhran and spoon players. :-)

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Being a newbie I am always afraid of doing this, being a wrecker. I tried to get a slow session started before one of our regular sessions so we could learn how not to be wreckers but a older sessioner would always show up and start tunes we didn’t know or play at tempos we couldn’t play. It was a mix of levels with very few newbies so we just sat there and it just became a longer regular session. I have found it hard to break into this world. Now I mostly sit and watch and play tunes at home.

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I love the idea of talking to their recording device when they go to the loo. Ha!

And Phantom Button, I found myself inserted in your session at one point many years ago before I had a fully formed sense of appropriate session etiquette. Since that time, I have kind of kicked myself for a moment where I took my banjo and walked all over a lovely tune being played on harp. Nobody else was playing, and in my naivete, I assumed that it was because nobody else knew the tune, so I just jumped right in. Of course people knew the tune… Everyone was sitting out to enjoy the way it was being played on harp. I hope I wasn’t considered a session wrecker that evening! You were all gracious enough to keep talking to me afterwards… But even if I bordered on session wrecking, rest assured that the moment has bothered me ever since. So maybe there’s hope for the session wreckers after all! ;-)

Fortunately, the issue doesn’t arrive too often. But when it does, it’s a difficult thing to deal with, because no matter how gently (or humanely) you try to handle the situation, it almost always ends up with bruised egos and bad feelings. I have one former session wrecker that has come around, and is now welcome at the session. And another one that went away for over a year, and now comes occasionally, but has learned how to be at least somewhat less annoying…

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Michael, I have a few pointers for you. First off, the fact that you’re worried about being a session wrecker means that you’re not. Being a beginner doesn’t automatically make you a session wrecker - being clueless about how what you’re doing is ruining other people’s music is what makes someone a wrecker.

Secondly, the best way to get better is to play with people better than you. And most people who play this music well still remember what it was like to "break in" to the world of playing. So they will often be encouraging.

And finally, it’s really difficult to get your playing up to session standards by practicing at home. The way to get good at playing in sessions is by playing in more sessions. When they’re playing a tune that you know, but at a faster tempo than you are comfortable with, try to play along anyway. Start by relaxing, closing your eyes, and trying to let the music flow, instead of trying to push hard to keep up. And in the times that you don’t know the tunes, try quietly lilting along, and you will at least be training your brain a bit to how the tunes go, and eventually that will make those tunes much easier to learn. Take a recording device along (most people use smart phones these days. Just make sure you turn it off before you go to the loo ;-)). Then you can use slow down software to practice with the tunes at more your tempo, and then you can start to push your tempos up.

But the main thing is to be friendly, and fun to hang out with, and people will accept you into the session and help encourage you to get better, instead of wishing you would just go away!

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Regarding how one deals with a session wrecker when you have a hosted session with enforcement supported by the venue management. Generally it starts with "Hey John, can I talk to you for a minute…" Then I focus on the specific behavior that is problematic and providing suggestions for how they can fix the problem, but making it clear that their continued participation in the session is contingent on them taking corrective action. If their reaction is "feck off, you can’t tell me what to do", which seems to happen a lot with these sorts of people, then they are invited to leave and banned from the session. If they are willing to make the requested adjustments, then they can stay and hopefully things will de-escalate. Nobody has a "right" to play at our session, and we actively curate a no a-hole policy that I’m told gives great comfort to the regulars, no matter what level they play at, from beginners to very experienced players.

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I had a wonderful experience a while back. A visiting bodhran player was wrecking havoc, so, with a mixture of honey tempered with firmness, I offered some suggestions about how and when to play. My method was to focus on how he could expand his strengths to crowd out his weaknesses. To my amazement, on his next visit, he not only took my suggestions, but had mastered them to the point he is now very welcome. It doesn’t always turn out that well, but dealing with a wrecker really isn’t that hard. Nothing to it but to do it. Take it from a veteran.

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Session wreckers come in many flavours. A few samples from my session host experiences:
- Obnoxious clueless guitar player who ruins every tune with "off" chords and doesn’t understand when told kindly to listen to the tune before joining in, but just continues his chord bashing and even says that he can figure out the chords for any tune straight away. Best told in a more direct manner to pack up and leave. He (in my experience it’s nearly always a "he") might or might not be offended, but who cares?
- Djembe player with a good sense of rhythm but playing far too loud. When asked by musician sitting next to him to take the volume down he replies that it’s no fun to play softly. When musician sitting next to him repeats the request, he packs up his instrument, punches the other musician on his way out and then leaves very quickly before anyone has had time to react to this surprise violence. Not welcome back. Ever.
- Stunningly beautiful young lady plays a melodica which seems to be tuned somewhere around A = 450. Ask her to get an instrument which is actually in standard tuning. She never came back.
- Kind but wobbly fiddler who plays along strongly with every tune, even though he doesn’t know it. The other musicians start taking long breaks to go to the bar etc. Tell guy kindly what the problem is. He immediately stops wrecking and instead only participates on tunes he knows well enough and just listens to tunes he doesn’t know. Will be welcome back.

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I enjoyed the Drone article. Failure to deal with wreckers is probably the main reason why I often give up on a session after just a few visits. It’s not just players who don’t know the tune or understand ITM; a very talented player can also wreck if he insists on jumping in to fill every gap with a tune whose key signature or obscurity almost guarantees that nobody else will know it.

As I see it, the core players are often too careful to risk causing offence. Smiling discretely amongst themselves to acknowledge the disruption, or sniggering when the offender is at the toilet/bar can help to ease the tension, but doesn’t solve the problem: the wrecker needs to be confronted.

Although many musicians are too “nice” for their own good, it can work the other way. I’ve witnessed some perfectly competent new attendees being taken to task quite harshly for being too loud, out of tune or out of rhythm when none of those criticisms were justified, the newbie being at worst guilty of over-enthusiasm.

I dare say the problem will always be with us, but for me it’s one of the biggest turn-offs in otherwise very enjoyable sessions.

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Reverend,
Thank for your post. It was encouraging.

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Pete (Reverend) the photo of you we put up on the dart board eventually fell off because it was torn to shreds. =D

Actually I have no recollection of said event.

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One thing all session wreckers have in common is that they really really want to be part of it. Sure isn’t that why any of us started going. Haven’t we all been session wreckers to some degree before we figured out what was happening? But there are some common threads between session wreckers.

● They don’t realize they are wrecking the session.

● They are delusional about their own abilities.

● They feel entitled to participate.

Because I have been the host I have also been expected to deal with them. I do my best but it’s one of the most frustrating and socially hazardous things I have ever done. The ones who don’t realize they are wrecking the session are easiest to deal with provided they aren’t either of the other two categories. You can usually reason with them, as others in this thread have mentioned, and they can become welcome sessioneers.

The delusional ones are very frustrating and have tremendous imaginations and will explain things like how they know all the tunes and are playing along just fine, etc. It’s Twilight Zone worthy. Yet if you ask them to play a tune on their own it’s cringeworthy too. They also make all sorts of wild excuses. If we weren’t trying to have a session there might be some entertainment value in it… but I’d rather have a session instead.

The self-entitled are the nastiest of all. They become very angry and sometimes even become violent. They will lecture you on the rules and regulations — all providing their untethered access. They will tell you what a "real Irish session" is and isn’t even though they’ve never been to one in Ireland. I have actually had a couple of these people suddenly stand and want to go fisticuffs right at the table.

I’m pretty sure I know who wrote this piece in The Drone and I’ve seen him employ some of these tactics to rescue what promised to be a great night of music. It seems that a session is very vulnerable to this sort of disruption and it’s hard to deal with because dealing with it can also be a session wrecker. A catch 22 of sorts.

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Apollo, grant me the serenity to listen and learn the tunes I cannot play,
Courage to play the tunes I can,
And wisdom to know the difference.

==

Refreshing discussion - this is always my worry too as a relative beginner. Very conscious of the privilege of being able to join in and sometimes even play along with very accomplished musicians (my heroes!).

Nobody has a right to impose a disruptive playing on the session and expect it to be tolerated. Unless billed as such; sessions aren’t "classes" or a training ground. Or perhaps they are - but if the level of play exceeds the abilities of the player - there is more to be learned by listening.

"Disruptive" is too high a bar to set for when it is just good manners to sit it out. Rule of thumb should be that if I don’t know the tune or the pace is above my competency - back out (or down below audible level) and listen/learn. Poor playing is on a sliding scale of annoying long before it crosses the line of outright disruptive.

For a friendly (community / open) session - there is probably a greater obligation to give a platform for everybody at varying levels through the evening and to support players of all abilities to carry a few tunes. It’s always easier in the bigger sessions 12-15 players and upwards because ultimately all playing is blended out in the "big ball of noise".

I hope I have the grace to welcome and respond to The Hint (a.k.a. look of death) whenever it is appropriately offered. Honouring the etiquette (and enforcing it when necessary) is part and parcel of successful sessions.

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Every genius is someone else’s fool…

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Sessions at festivals are an unknown quantity: sometimes hosted, sometimes not: sometimes labelled as, e.g. Irish, Bluegrass, tunes only, mixed, singaround, sometimes not.
One of the worst session-wreckings I’ve ever experienced occurred when, what had been a nice gentle session, with everyone getting a turn to start something, was suddenly invaded by a guy with a jumbo guitar and ego to match, along with harem of young ladies: proceeded to sing 60s/70s pop songs back-to-back, egged on by the harem. Thereafter, if anyone ventured to try to get a song or tune in between his efforts, he and said "ladies" just shouted and screamed at each other over the music. Not many minutes of that and we were off to look for another session elsewhere!

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"Every genius is someone else’s fool…"

Well said. And "Genius", as Scott Skinner said, or quoted, in humble reference to himself, "does what it must." Sometimes the obsessiveness of an exceptionally talented person can be a pain: the young Robert Johnson was supposed to have been a major annoyance to older bluesmen before he disappeared and made his deal with the devil; K.D. Lang is said to have, in her earlier days, endlessly imposed her unpolished singing and rudimentary guitar-playing on fellow-attendees - including musicians - of social gatherings … we all know of, if not have experienced, other examples. Now, that’s no help in dealing with session-wreckers; just something to file away in the back of your mind.

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In the field of psychology, the Dunning–Kruger effect is a cognitive bias in which people of low ability have illusory superiority and mistakenly assess their cognitive ability as greater than it is. The cognitive bias of illusory superiority comes from the inability of low-ability people to recognize their lack of ability. Without the self-awareness of metacognition, low-ability people cannot objectively evaluate their competence or incompetence.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunning%E2%80%93Kruger_effect

In my experience with session wreckers, Dunning-Kruger seems to have been an important factor. Someone who doesn’t know a tune, or ITM in general, may not realize how inappropriate their playing is because they don’t know what the tune is actually supposed to sound like.

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We used to have a guy who turned up with a guitar (evidently un-tunable), who spoke with one of these weird hybrid English/Irish accents, with lots of "oi" sounds, and he became affectionately known as "Plastic Paddy".

As soon as a set started up, he was right in there with his three chords (usually the wrong ones), strumming away relentlessly, almost ploughing through the pickguard, and thrashing away like there’s no tomorrow. One time he even drowned out a visiting electric bass player with a small amp!

There was no point trying to reason with him ("sure now, music’s for everyone…what’s all the fuss about?"), and nothing that you said could ever offend him. You’d have to turn a rusty corkscrew up his bum to do that :)

He was a difficult one to deal with, in that no one could find a way to let him know just how disruptive he was to the music - and the fact that he kept buying everyone drinks made it all the more difficult.

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You can also get friends and/or partners turning up and disrupting proceedings and not necessarily as players either. Sometimes they can even be a nuisance when they’re sober as they often like to "organise" the seating arrangements and so on.

Also, you’ll sometimes get well (often very) respected musicians turning up after a day or night "on the tear" and it’s not always easy to keep them in check either.
:-)

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There have been a few comforting stories here about disruptive players. Some, when told the truth about their playing, have returned to play considerately, then worked to improve their music. So they ceased to be session wreckers. I have on an off day rather spoilt an Orkney session (by taking the lead on piano for more than 4 minutes!). Hints dropped by the other players ought to have the desired effect, but I do so love playing the piano and haven’t learned vamping…

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I think the most important skill for anyone taking part in a session is knowing when to shut up.

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Unfortunately, some people don’t have the self awareness to know they’re causing a disruption, but, also having been the "host", I agree that having a quiet word quite often goes a long way towards resolving a wrecking situation, and can even help the offender realise what they’re doing.

Or, you can try what a very experienced Northern Irish friend did at a session I was at.. while he was in full flight the door flew open and in came a couple of fellas, one "playing" a tambourine above his head. With gusto. McGreavey (you might know him) stops, fixes them with a stare and says loudly: "ye can feck off with that now"! Never saw them again.

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Playing many years ago with Chris Droney and Paul Theasby (RIP), in Ballyvaughan, a woman got up from a table, picked up a bodhran and started marching around the pub with it, whacking it more or less in time with a beat no-one else could hear. Paul was a great fiddler and operated an extermination business.
"I can handle this," Paul said. "I know how to handle pests. "
The woman left shortly after he spoke to her and we never saw her again.
Much harder is to deal with somebody in your session who has been playing for 20 years, still hasn’t a clue, plays his banjo way too loud and who doesn’t practice much. Do you say, "You play too loud, and you don’t practice enough?"

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At the Girvan festival some years ago, we were having a lovely wee tune session when a herd of guitar players, perhaps six or seven, all piled in and strummed along with all the wrong chords during the tunes, and at any vague gap between sets of tunes, they sang the sorts of songs that people who know only three chords sing. Not well, either. I wondered if most of the space in the pubs was in use, so this group who wanted a sing-song decided screw it, they would do it on top of our tune session. But no, it turned out this group ‘always’ played in that bar at that time (I think it was the Royal), and they weren’t going to be dissuaded simply because some tune players had started a session there first!

In the ensuing stand-off, we blinked first and left to find another place to play, even though they had made a d— move. They obviously didn’t care.

Some years before that, a guy with a bongo became a regular at the session I went to in Glasgow. He played it as loud as he could hit it, and his rhythm was terrible. And he kept coming, every week, and didn’t pick up the subtle hints and ‘looks of death.’ So finally, the session organiser had to deal with it in a more direct way. I think he was very diplomatic about it and gave a spiel to the effect of the bongo not being appropriate for Irish music, but if the chap was willing to learn the bodhran and learn more about the tunes, he would be very welcome at the session, etc. etc. Apparently the guy still took offense and was pretty upset. But he went away.

Another time, a mandolin player who ran another session in town appeared at this one, completely wrecked. So hammered he couldn’t play the tunes coherently, so no one played along with him since we couldn’t recognise anything. He was offended by this, complaining, "You’re so damned snobbish you won’t even play the Kesh!" Well, we would have played it if we’d known what it was! Anyway, he kept starting more and more tunes, but getting more incoherent and belligerant, until the bar staff had to remove him.

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I showed up at the late session at O’Keefe’s in Ennis last year after a full night of pints and sat down and got the concertina out. They asked me to start a tune, so I attempted to play, Paddy Kelly’s (The One After It), and the tune in my head was very clear… however, what was coming out of my instrument was in serious tipsy swagger. I stopped right away and started putting it back in the case saying, "That was the drunken version… I’ll play the sober version another time." And I got up and went to the ba*hic*bar.

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Might have been guilty of wrecking a session at our first ever trip to Girvan (since Dr SS mentioned that festival). A young band from Cape Breton, guests at the festival, were supposedly hosting a session, which meant that they played interminable "sets" of one tune over and over again for 20 minutes non-stop. My 2 friends and I decided to interject with a Scottish trad song, between these "sets", at which the band got up and left, leaving us to entertain the remaining entourage of local Sunday heavy drinkers, who enjoyed the songs. ("You’re much better than those effing fiddlers" (sic). The band were later seen in the pub yard outside, which, being a lovely sunny day, was perhaps a better place to be. When they appeared in the evening concert, someone in the audience also asked if they could sing a song between those lengthy one-tune "sets", at which they looked totally flummoxed: "What do you want us to sing? Oh, Canada?"

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I’ve never really been keen on the practice of "planting" festival guests in local hostelries. Perhaps some festivals feel obliged to do this as some of the bars and restaurants may be offering some kind of financial support towards the program.
Anyway, the result is often unsatisfactory. The artists don’t always know what is expected of them in such situations and may not be easily able to adapt to a session situation where other musicians and singers are present. Arguably, it would be better to have good local and well tried sessioneers to host such sessions.
Having said that, Girvan is usually quite good at this and their guests usually mingle very well with the session goers.

re
"interminable "sets" of one tune over and over again for 20 minutes non-stop"
:-)
I think that’s maybe a little unkind. Many tune sets can sound like that if you are unfamiliar with the repertoire.
Sometimes you can get the same song all night too. Someone usually gets drowned or poisoned by their lover or husband and they can often last for 20 minutes too :-)

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Ha-ha, Trish. But are you sure they were one-tune sets? It’s only relatively recently that changes of tonal centre within Cape Breton sets became more common. There are not too many long sets that have been recorded but there are a few on "Cape Breton Fiddle Music Not Calm" where, in one set, Howie MacDonald and Ashley MacIsaac play fifteen tunes in Gmaj/min (about thirteen minutes worth) before changing tonal centre to D.
See here: https://www.cbfiddle.com/rx/rec/r42.html

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Good point, Donald.
They do like to stick to the one key in CB. :-)

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It is almost unheard of for a Cape Breton fiddler within the last 50 years to play one tune more than twice through in public performance. One tune for 20 minutes? Not saying it’s impossible, but … I’m more than a little skeptical ….

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If you meet a session wrecker in the morning, you’ve met a session wrecker. If you meet session wreckers all day, you’re the session wrecker.

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I think there is an opera by Ethel Smythe called "The Wreckers". Thought of her last year as 2018 commemorated 100 years since women got the vote, and she wrote the very rousing "Song of the Women" for the suffragettes. Did the Wreckers wreck ships to get hold of their cargoes? A lot of that went on in remoter seaside places. Irrelevant comment but couldn’t resist..

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One tune it was - not sound-alikes! Honest! Johnny Jay at least should know that I do recognise different tunes when I hear them change from one to the other! ;-)

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Of course, I do, but I thought you were just being cheeky.
:-)

So, if a band performs some type of arrangement with one tune which lasts for twenty minutes then it is obviously a "performance" as opposed to a session ( Oh no, not that one again :-P).
Therefore, my comment about the policy of "planting" festival guests in pubs obviously applied in this particular case too.

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Maybe they kept playing the same tune over and over again in the hope that the other participants would eventually pick it up and join in!

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I would wager that most "session wreckers" are absolutely mortified when they are made aware of their transgressions. A "gentle word" usually goes a long way with most reasonable people who are just beginning their journey and don’t quite know the local customs. In most cases, as pointed out in many examples above, people make efforts to improve and learn from their session social gaffs. Hopefully, I think we can all spot the difference between an earnest learner and a completely obnoxious buffoon.

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Ah memories of Girvan! I swear I shared an open mike session there in 1986 with this guy, the Ultimate Session Wrecker. WARNING: Parental Advisory on Language. He uses, as Mrs. Doyle would say, "the word that’s worse than feck". Wherever your session wrecker pops up, remember, it could be worse, it could be Ronnie Dreich.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jm3l-xpEi98

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He’s a treat compared to some of the singer strummers I’ve heard over the years.
;-)

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Re, Justa Nutter’s comment, "I think we can all spot the difference between an earnest learner and a completely obnoxious buffoon." Unfortunately, we can— but it is always the obnoxious — musically — buffoon who doesn’t get it.
The problem at our local session is that the banjo player is a lovely guy, from Dublin, who plays everything too loud. You wouldn’t mind this (after all, it is a banjo…) but his accomplishment isn’t nearly in accord with the volume he produces, so we all suffer. You wouldn’t mind him tripping over his own notes if he wasn’t the loudest player in the session. It all gets more complicated because we like him so much!

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Anyone has the capacity to reform (inexperienced buffoons may just initially long to display how they can play Irish tunes etc.). But, as others have said, a few carefully chosen words by someone in the session may allow a "wrecker" to reflect and reform. I’d say your average human being does not aim to cause offence. Exceptions there are indeed (woeful truth). Phew, long discussion this is becoming…

Re: Sessions Matter

The very term "Session Wreckers" implies that sessions are fragile and vulnerable to the whims of a single player. The anonymous Drone article suggests wreckers are, "(most session wreckers are)n’t reasonable human beings." It’s great sarcasm based on generalisation, fear and over-reliance on passive-aggressive kneejerk reactions.
A sensible solution is responding w/civility. The most responsible member of the session can pull an offending player aside for an articulate, teachable experience; sooner rather than after the "wrecker" is made to feel too welcome for his or her own good. At which point the wrecker has a standing invitation to play (disrupt/offend)
to his heart’s content.

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"It’s great sarcasm based on generalisation, ….. " It’s based on truth. I’ve seen many, many sessions ruined by a single inconsiderate individual. What you do about it is another matter.

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Michael, if it’s possible consider getting together with your fellow ‘newbies’ for house sessions. It’s a good way to control the tempo and choice of tunes, and everyone gets a chance to grow.

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I was playing in a session yesterday and had started a set of reels when I heard what sounded like a spoons player rattling horrendously out of time. I found it challenging to not slide off my rhythm, but looking around, there was no spoons player in sight. Then, a flute player who wasn’t playing that tune picked up his pint, and suddenly, the noise stopped. The pint had been sitting next to a hard, plastic-y flute case and was vibrating against the case with people stomping their feet.

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Coming at this from more of a learner angle… I’ve run into situations where I saw a sign "OPEN SESSION" and got all excited about it. Then I arrived to find that everyone else in the room has been playing exactly the same pieces in exactly the same order with people taking solos in exactly the same places for 20 years and they don’t want ANY additions or changes. It seems to me that at this point they aren’t an open session any more. They’re a group who has rehearsed extensively, knows exactly what they want to do, and is there to give a performance. "Open session" implies a certain amount of flexibility, doesn’t it?

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The sign got you in the door - that’s its only function.

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So… er… ugh… say a pretty decent player with 30-40 Irish pieces in her repertoire practices a piece up really hard so she can make a good-sounding contribution to the session…. is it okay to call the name of that piece out as a suggestion? Or is it too forward?

Re: Session Wreckers on The Drone :-)

With all due respect, Kenny, I read the OP’s article from The Drone ~ Ireland’s Finest Traditional Irish Music News Source https://bit.ly/2Gjoml6 in the spirit in which it is written. Not as accurate, fact-based news.
I read it as satire, hyperbole, characterisation. I read every article as if it were written to be literally taken
as faux news. That is how The Drone describes it’s format.

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"So… er… ugh… say a pretty decent player with 30-40 Irish pieces in her repertoire practices a piece up really hard so she can make a good-sounding contribution to the session…. is it okay to call the name of that piece out as a suggestion? Or is it too forward?"

If you came to the sessions I cohost for you would be invited to start a tune at some point and that’s a good place to do exactly what you are suggesting. Usually seasoned session hosts will do this. If there isn’t a host… say it’s a festival or party or whatever… suggesting it to the group is a good approach.

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"I read it as satire, hyperbole, characterisation. I read every article as if it were written to be literally taken
as faux news."

I think the author was actually speaking to the issue in sincerity… if I know who he is. It sounds just like what I’ve heard said. He has a brilliant sense of humor and satire… but I think this might be an exception.

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Drinharp, I have tried that but no takers yet.

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Faux is a fancy word for rag painting. You are messing up “faux” news with Fox News perhaps?

Now, look it.

We have all been wreckers at one time or another. Sure I’m a wrecker and I’m proud. I don’t know if I’m a wrecker or a wreck but what the heck?

Show love, guide them to a proper instrument, ask them if they want to learn new tunes.

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Re: Session Wreckers

A bodhoranistra turned up to a Huddersfield session and it was very clear it was their first night at a session.
The goat was confiscated and was passed around the room. Everyone else had a tune on it ………. to show them how it should be done.