Passages and survival

Passages and survival

Let us be glad —- let us be VERY glad —- that our chosen art form (ITM) does not depend on the whims of corporations for its survival.

I just heard that Ilford has closed its fine art black and white film division. For those of you who don’t know what this means, it amounts to the death knell for black and white film photography. Ilford was the last maker of those films. Digital doesn’t cut it for certain purposes, at least not yet. I could spend a screen or two naming photographers who would have been unable to produce their incredible images without good B&W film, but I’ll spare y’all.

The relevance of this to ITM? Just be glad the music is passed on alive, by ear, by a community of people all over the globe. We can keep it going and alive for the next 37 generations or beyond, should we choose to and should our children and their children choose to. It won’t get quietly thrown in the trash as no longer profitable by some suit in a corner office. Specific recordings may come and go but the tunes will survive.

Sara

Re: Passages and survival

Imagine if you could only play a fiddle once and the last fiddle maker just decided to stop making fiddles - rediculous

or you couldn’t tolerate human insulin and the last person making pig insulin decided to stop production … wait, that is really happening too!

Re: Passages and survival

"Oooh you’ve killed my art, you’ve killed my art. My art depended on the altruistic leanings of a capitalist corporation to survive. And now I can no longer create. Boo Hoo."r

Posted .

Re: Passages and survival

Ilford’s black&white division is just down the road from here. They used to be one of my customers, but since the takeover a few years back it’s been run by a right shower of nurks.

Another corporate whim that spoiled things was when the kennel club decided to recognise the Border Collie as a breed. Now, stupid dog breeders are busy breeding for appearance instead of intelligence, and they’ll end up with dogs they call border collies but which are as stupid and unhealthy as red setters and golden retrievers and the like.

We could have a revolution!
The great Traditional Music riots of 04 they’ll call it.
"first thing we do - let’s kill all the lawyers" - Shakespeare: Henry VI (i think)

Anyone up for a revolution? Not now, I mean. How about after another beer … . . .

Re: Passages and survival

You say you want a revolution… Don’t you know it’s gonna be alright?

Posted by .

Re: Passages and survival

MIchael - no skin off my nose if you want to get snirpy, I’m not a shooter. But I worked in the industry for 8 1/2 years and I know a half a dozen people whose work has just been ended. Not pretentious artistes, just regular people to whom photography is the most important thing in the world. It isn’t their art, it’s their blood and guts. The world’s a poorer place without the ability for them to continue capturing the incredible images you can get on a good black and white film. Ansel Adams, Alfred Stieglitz, Yousuf Karsh —- the list could go on, but I won’t.
Lil Dog, I’d liken it to the situation that would result if all of the stringmakers were bought up by one company, which then discontinued making all of the good strings and produced only the sh*te suitable for machine-made kiddy fiddles. So you still had your fiddle, but could never again get strings that didn’t sound like cheap tin.
Dave, "right shower of nurks" — LOL!!! That image is perfect, and it matches my experience of the ownership.
I think the time for the revolution is right after a good session. ;)
Sara

Re: Passages and survival

Sara-What is encouraging in situations like this is that some small company usually sees an opportunity and fills in the gap left by the clueless giant corporation. Look at the microbrew industry that evolved after people got sick of drinking crap beer (note: tie-in to ITM), or the proliferation of farmer’s markets and stores that sell real food. (Geesh, I sound like a shill for the capitalizt system…..) It is a bummer, thought. B&W film is such a great thing when you’re learning photography, because you get to develop and print your own stuff.

Re: Passages and survival

Good point, O fellow Oregonian! *grin*
I know there are a couple of teeny little outfits still doing B&W film of quality, but they’re eastern European and try getting their film in the US. I’m hoping something of the niche-filling variety happens. The problem is that conventional wisdom claims film per se will be gone within 10 years, edited out of existence by digital.

Again, this is a super strong point of ITM and the like; we’re a network of individuals and small groups with an intense passion for the music, fed by mostly small companies making the instruments and accessories we use, and we don’t depend on the corporate world to provide us with the wherewithal to do our thing (except insofar as many of us work for the corporate world, that is). What we’re doing will make it.

Whoops. Something hit the rant-o-matic button again. Sorry! ;)

Sara

Re: Passages and survival

Lol, "Rant-o-matic" *snort*

Posted .

Re: Passages and survival

I think we all have one Jim, just that not everyone uses it.

Re: Passages and survival

Sara looks at capitalism going down the root of all the string makers being bought by one company and the quality going down. This is merely alarmist stuff on the extreems of economic systems where the far right meets the far left. But the basics of supply and demand rule this stuff out. If enough people want B&W film, someone will make it. And if you are so unlucky enough to be the only person in the whole world to want B&W film, than make it yourself. (It’s no different from pipers making their own reeds)

Posted .

Re: Passages and survival

There’s also several hundred people out of work with the closure of the factory.

Perhaps they could all make reeds for pipers.

Re: Passages and survival

If you really need to get nostalgic, the entire film manufacturing/processing industry is shutting down. Consumer film production factories are closing, Mom and Pop camera stores and local film processors can’t compete with low cost bulk processors, and nobody’s buying film cameras.

That means huge numbers of people out of work around the world, and the end of an environmentally unfriendly product. On the other hand, cheap, relatively accessible digital cameras are becoming widely available. Who’s to say that this will or won’t ultimately be a net benefit to society?

Micheal’s right though, there’s no point in complaining that no film is available when the invisible hand of consumer camera sales has given the finger to film and swiched to digital. Just be glad that the market leaves the world of Irish music alone for the most part.

Posted by .

Re: Passages and survival

There’s a difference between mourning a death and complaining.
Gzeg, Your last sentence is the whole point of my thread…
Sara