Question about cork

Question about cork

Hey all,
I was playing flute earlier and noticed the sound has changed a bit. I stuck my pinkie in to the emboucre hole to check the positioning of the cork and to my surprise, it’s come loose.
I slid it back roughly to where I remember it being, but looking for a more perminent solution.
It is the 3 piece Dixon delrin flute.
Thanks

Re: Question about cork

Unless you have very unusual fingers, you should not be able to touch the cork thru the embouchure hole. You can reach it from the end cap, but you could only move the cork in one direction. To move it back, you need a dowel to push it towards the end cap. If it is loose, take it to an instrument repair person to fit new one. I have to wonder how this happened.

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Re: Question about cork

I’ve absolutely no clue. My pinkie is rather slim and narrow and I can fit it in the hole and touch the cork. I pushed it back a bit and it seems to be staying.
thanks! 🙂

Re: Question about cork

Have it checked out. It may be affecting intonation and an airtight seal more than you realize, even if the cork stays in place.

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Re: Question about cork

It’s probably dried out and shrunk a bit. Measure the diameter of the tube at the head, probably about 18-19mm, and mark that on the end of a long stick (cleaning rod will do if you have one). Push the stick up the head of the flute and use it to move the cork (use the least pressure necessary to do this). Try positioning so that when the rod touches the cork you can see the mark centred in the embouchure hole. Good enough for a rough guide anyway, you can experiment a bit after that.

Re: Question about cork

Corks can be revived with steam. If it’s polymer you can use a bit of Teflon tape though I wouldn’t use Teflon tape in an unlined wooden flute. It’s also an opportunity to experiment where the cork is best for you.

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Re: Question about cork

I would get a new cork installed. It should not be expensive. You can revive it and use tape but it will shrink again at some point. I would rest easier knowing that I have a good tight fitting cork that doesn’t leak and stays in place. If installed properly it should last longer than you have the flute.

Re: Question about cork

The professionally-made flute cleaning rods you get from music shops have a scribe line showing where the cork should be placed on a Boehm flute, which would give you a rough positioning.

I get the basic position of the cork by playing octaves, especially G-g, and put the cork where these notes are in tune to each other.

For the fine positioning, if the cork is exactly right you can play G in the low octave and slowly introduce more and more of g in the second octave until the note is half G and half g, in other words the two notes sounding simultaneously and blending together.

Re: Question about cork

All those who are offering do it yourself advice (and videos) realize that you’re telling this to someone who is blind, right? 😛

Re: Question about cork

Buy more wine. Sooner or later you’ll find the right size cork.
It’s an easy job that you needn’t pay somebody to do.
I’m sure you have a friend who could do the job.
You can share the wine with the friend who positions the cork.
Jem Hammond is correct about cork placement. Easy peasy.
In winter the cork stopper can dry out unless you play every day.
Nothing to get too worried about.
Drink the wine, get the cork, play more, and all will be well.

Re: Question about cork

Does soaking the corks in Tullamore Dew help intonation?
If memory serves, the Dixon 3 piece Delrin flute is using a synthetic cork
Cheers!

Re: Question about cork

I was delighted to find my favorite Port had the exact size cork, so not jus’ any ol’ port in a storm 🙂

Re: Question about cork

What port is that? Links, please
I’m a fan of wine, not tried many ports though.

Re: Question about cork

Absinthe corks should do the job too, my drink of choice. 🙂