Canadian music scene

Canadian music scene

canadian celtic-
Being from the states and a celt, the last couple of years I’ve been hearing more and more from Canadians musically in the celtic genre. Personally, I’m envious, and I applaud their style; it seems like the music scene in Canada is dynamic, evolving, and supported by a large amount of their population. I think those are important elements to supporting a musical tradition. And it’s distinctive enough that I can hear unknown groups play music and I can identify that they’re Canadian. SO- the question is- what makes Canadian celtic Canadian? What stylisms and musical vernacular makes it distinct?

Re: Canadian music scene

Canada’s a big place - where are you hearing these musicians or cd’s? Cape Breton fiddling is very popular, and the style is being played and taught elsewhere than in Cape Breton itself. Here in Toronto, there are several Irish sessions that also include some other Celtic regional styles, and yes, you’re right, there’s quite a lot of interest in celtic music generally.

If you’re envious, come on and play with us at the Victory Thursday nights. Then you’ll be one of us.??

Re: Canadian music scene

Some years ago we warmed up the crowd prior to Mary Lamond coming on. A couple of years ago saw Great Big Sea perform here in Boise. Two years ago we performed next to a Vancover group, The Kinsman. Last night I walked into Borders Music store and heard a group Cd coming over the store system, I listened about 20 seconds and somehow knew they were Canadians. I asked the store manager who was on the CD and he told me Leahy. I walked out of the store with 3 of their CDs. And it got me to musing-how is it I knew it was Canadians I heard? What am I hearing in these diverse performers that says "Canada"?

Re: Canadian music scene

And BTW, fiddlefingers, where is the Victory? You never know..

Re: Canadian music scene

Oh. Toronto. Duh. It would help if I read closer.

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French Canadian and Cape Breton influences tend to be what make me think "Canadian". Where’s Kerri? She could probably tell you all you wanted to know…

Re: Canadian music scene

Cape Breton…Someday I’ll go there, listen, and sponge it all up. And in transit, make sure I’m in Toronto of a Thursday…Music is wonderful. Btw, Zina Lee, I hope sometime to meet you and sit in on a tune or three.

Re: Canadian music scene

Sounds good to me, George!

Rosheen

George, just found this thanks to Pat Garrett, who is booking Rosheen’s US tours:

http://www.rosheen.net/EngHome.asp

Not really my kind of stuff (did the world REALLY need another recorded track of Morrison’s? and there’s an awful lot of suspicious reverb on the tracks — LOTS of production going on here), but I thought you might be interested in a band from Quebec.

Re: Canadian music scene

I’d like to think that the Canadian style is defined in the same way that we distinguish between a Clare style or Sligo. Cape Breton is an Island and much of the tradition that developed there both in language and in music come from the isolation of being an island. The Gaelic that is spoken in Cape Breton is distinctive because it was preseved on the island without influences from many parts of the celtic world. The music, I believe is the same. The same goes for the music from Newfoundland and from Quebec. In Manitoba the Metis influence is very evident but that also is a development of style that had it roots in the Scottish and Irish music of the settlers. Also the style and rhythm of the music will reflect the different styles of dance.

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Re: Canadian music scene

Thanks for the post, Zina. I notice bass and a trap set. I couldn’t get the sound to work. After listening for a good part of the day to some of the Canadian CDs I have (and La Bottine Souriante ROCKS even if it isn’t Irish) I notice the Canadians performers all seem to be very comfortable with a trap set
with cymbals tapping out an even 4/4 on a lot of cuts, with an electric bass supporting. I think this reflects what Anny is saying about the style and rhythm reflecting the kind of dance. The Canadian groups I’ve seen perform really get the crowd up on their feet and doing the rock and roll shimmy. I think the trap and bass support that kind of venue where the folks can find an open place and boogie. They’re just fun for a lot of people that want to have a good time. I do hear that piano
in a lot of cuts, again, 4/4 and danceable, Cape Breton style, or similar to New England Contra music. So maybe the Canadian venues encourage dancing more than most of the venues I’ve been playing, which is, you listen, we play.

Re: Canadian music scene

Btw-we’ve been working on a CD-and one of the tracks has-horrors-another track of Morrisons! Yeah, I know, everybody has heard that a jillion times. Maybe I’ll lobby to get rid of it. Or print a disclosure on the notes about "some tracks contain production artifacts that do not express the management’s opinion."

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Rainog -

How did you like Leahy? Their instramental tracks are beyond amazing but their vocals leave a lot to be desired in my opinion…

Re: Canadian music scene

Has anyone else heard the French Canadian Pierre Schryer Band? They’ve played a few times in our local village hall and the most recent line-up is really very good. They’re all brilliant technicians, which can apparently be said for a lot of Canadian musicians - I know Canadian pipers certainly give the Scots a run for their money.

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I just bought 3 of their CDs(Leahy). I enjoy listening to them. At times, there’s some fiddle riffs in there that sound almost Ukrainian, sort of the same sound I hear when I listen to Peter Ostrouko. Anybody in Irish music that is willing to produce and perform music for a living has my respect and condolences, because most likely you can make a lot better livng at a day job. At least I can. Example- our band has six and we’re playing a street fair in town this weekend. We’re pretty competent and we spent a lot of time and energy on our set arrangements. We’re making 100 dollars on a 45 minute set. Now factor in rehearsal time, setup and takedown. It’s pretty dismal pay, isn’t it? Good thing we have day jobs! I’ll watch for Pierre Schryer, sounds interesting. Thanks for the tip.

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Just a little reminder.Theres a little Irish Folk /Traditional radio show thats been thriving for 22 years and still going strong.The Music of Ireland is a one hour weekly show which airs every Sunday at 7:04pm(Atlantic time-GMTminus4)and is also webcast at www.1015thehawk.com. And by the way,the Cape Breton Music tradition also has an Irish component.There has been a distinct northside Irish flavour for,many,many years These folks used to get Michael Coleman tunes and learn from either the radio or from old 78,s.There are many Irish tunes which are now included in the repetoire of most Cape Breton fiddlers

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The Canadian music scene is just booming! As a Cape Breton style fiddler from Ottawa, I know this firsthand. We have so many great celtic bands here. For example: The Barra MacNeils, Slainte Mhath, Beolach, Leahy (and I agree that some of their vocal stuff can be sketchy), Bottine Souriante, The McDades (relative newbies but LISTEN they are amazing celtic/jazz/world), Pierre Schryer (amazing mixture of styles!!) and of course Natalie MacMaster. We have so much to be proud of!

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And howse about "Vishten". They were in our area a couple of months ago and knocked our collective socks off. We had never heard of them, but the hall in small town Idaho was sold out! Go figure. Acadian style from the east somewhere, you could definitely tell they were Canadian. Didn’t see you there George, where were you?

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Newfoundland often getsoverlooked, as people tend to look (or travel) no farther than Cape Breton in Eastern Canada. Newfoundland’s music scene is unique in that it is a bit "looser" than the more traditional styles of CB. Although Newfoundland is an island DEEPLY steeped in tradition (the accents, food, and soirees are distinctly Irish, and English, and even French), the people are very loyal and proud of their individualism with regards to the rest of Canada. The music scene reflects this - it has a distinctly traditional flavour, but is also dynamic and unique with the changes from more recent generations.

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I’ve noticed that all the people on here mention only the east coast of Canada. Which makes sense, it is generally the part of Canada where the celtic music is. I live on Vancouver Island in BC, and we don’t seem to have as much celtic over here. Canada does have some great bands though…For example, Volee de Castors, Bottine Souriante, Natalie MacMaster, Leahy, The McDades, Slainthe Mhath, Beolach and Pierre Schryer, to name a few. They are all good live as well. I admit, it can be hard to play celtic music with other people over here, as we are few. I’m in a young band that has toured in Canada and Europe, the latter which has the most amazing bands in the world…But we canadians can hold our own!