Tune ID

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I have no idea, but now I need to go an wash my ears out .

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Very funny. It’s really not that bad though!

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"Very funny. It’s really not that bad though!"

No, I’m sorry, it really is.

Whoever is responsible for it fails in the most fundamental way as a musician (and possibly as a human being!) They don’t understand how the music is supposed to sound, giving it a twee, Olde English sensibility. The flute player opts to tongue pretty much every single note and boldly eschew ornaments whatsoever - wherever there should be a roll, they’ll tongue the root note as a triplet instead…

I’d go as far as to say, a musician with the sheet music for the basic tune and without any exposure to irish music whatsoever working from first principles, would make a better fist of it.

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The group is called "Dragonsfire" and they’re from Kent, England.

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Hi Whimbrel,

I seriously advise you not to listen to any more of that music it will contaminate your brain.
If you need some suggestions of what you could or should be listening to, I can dig out some youtube clips, there is so much good music to listen to.

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so am I from Kent but I’m happy to say I ‘ve never come across them……………..

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Thanks everyone.
What are some of your favorite groups, Theirlandais?

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Reminds me a bit of James Galway interpreting a Hornpipe…slightly painful. The pity is he is a great player in his own field.

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Whimbrel, I wouldn’t particularly think of groups but just people that play together

here’s some for starters not in any particular order or preference (just a quick browse on youtube)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A5kSV7WYpY4

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=84s5W6Dygfg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JWTNwnHTmFo

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SAmSReWOm7w

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qdBFYb9AXpE&t=7s

etc..

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I just had a listen to the ‘Folk Music of England’ track, the 1st tune sounded like a version of ‘Ye Banks and Braes of Bonny Doon’ [did Robbie Burns nick an English tune for his song???] and the 2nd and 3rd were versions of well known Morris dances, the proper names of which escape me at the moment. All very twee and mock-Tudor, they play competently and probably go down well at big country house banquets, and good luck to them. I just hope never to hear them play an ‘Irish Jig’ again!

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Whimbrel, your Irish merry making seems to have gotten flogged (by the band & the board). I’m not one to say "that’s not Irish" or even "too much tonguing" but that bit of flute playing is textbook how not to play Irish music. No offense intended; though it is hard for me to listen to the tunes played as such. Thanks for posting since it is good to know what other members are listening to.
Here is a link to some music I heard this morning on NPR’s Sunday Baroque. I’m hoping the link works & you enjoy the flute playing. It’s Chris Norman. https://open.spotify.com/track/0EnAwaPjY6yyjwLpgY83zU

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Well I enjoyed it (the first one). I rather think it may be what irish music sounded like 300 years ago in a formal setting like a court or something. How long has ‘traditional’ irish ornamentation been around anyway?
I liked it for what it was.

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"How long has ‘traditional’ irish ornamentation been around anyway?"

Well… the way I’ve heard it, is that it started with the early (pastoral?) pipes. Unlike the later Uilleann pipes and similar to Scottish pipes, there is a continuous flow of sound through the chanter. Players of those pipes developed a technique of twiddly bits with the fingers, to break up consecutive notes. It became an established style that was adapted later on, when fiddles, flutes, and whistles arrived on the scene. Players of those instruments found ways to copy and adapt the piping ornaments.

It’s why you play a cut to break up two consecutive notes at the same pitch. You don’t *have* to do that on a fiddle or flute, but it’s how the early pipes had to do it. And then later on, those ideas get elaborated into things like long rolls to accent a quarter note, and so on. Musicians are still finding ways to adapt piping ornaments, like Matt Molloy’s version of a cran on flute.

Anyway, I don’t know how well established that theory is, but it makes sense to me that the "King" instrument in Irish trad — the pipes — is where this all started. There is also the Irish harp tradition, but that’s a separate area, maybe more closely related to the "court" music in the OP’s band example.