Irish Flute You’d Reccommend to Beginner

Irish Flute You’d Reccommend to Beginner

I’ve been wanting to buy an Irish flute for a good year now and I was just about to buy this one: https://mcneelamusic.com/the-cygnet-rosewood-flute-with-foam-lined-box/
but I thought I should get an opinion, especially experienced players. Is this a decent flute? Or would you recommend looking elsewhere?
I can’t spend over $200 and I really would like it to be wood. I don’t like the idea of playing a polymer one at all. Advice would be appreciated! Thank yew!

Re: Irish Flute You’d Reccommend to Beginner

Wait another couple of month and get one of these:
http://www.somers-flutes.com/prices-contact
https://www.mandeirishflutes.ie
Honestly, I don’t know the McNeela wooden flute. But there probably is a reason, why they are cheaper, then most (or maybe all) delrin flutes. Sommers and Michael Cronnolly flutes have been praised by countless people here ond on Chiff & Fipple as good beginner instruments. I played a M&E flue for 7 years before I bought a much more expensive wooden flute -and I still play my cheap M&E delrin flute often!

Also keep in mind, that wooden flues can get cracks. The quality of wood and the instrument making plays a big role in that! Therefore, I really wouldn’t trust a 200 Euro wooden flute to stay fine…
Also, in case you buy a delrin flute now and a top wooden flute in the future, you definitely will be happy in a couple of years, to still have a non destructible delrin flute for holidays, camping…rouge sessions, etc. 🙂

M&E flutes are easier to play, because they have smaller tone holes and a smaller bore, compared to the Sommers flutes. Therefore, they might be especially well suited for a beginner. But on the other hand, there are people wo liked their cheap Sommers flute so much, that they spend well over 1000 $ dollars on it, to get keys on them!

Re: Irish Flute You’d Reccommend to Beginner

Rouge sessions - are you just making that up?

Re: Irish Flute You’d Reccommend to Beginner

And if you do go for wood then a good option is the Casey Burn’s Folk flute. Ideally second hand if price is a consideration. Try checking out the Chiff and Fipple for sale forums. Forums.chiffandfipple.com. There is a flute forum and a used instruments exchange forum. Watch that for a few months and something worthwhile will crop up. Or post a "wanted" there. Other flutes come and go there regularly.

I personally am not a fan of plastic, though I can see the advantages. I recognise that this is a taste issue - I just prefer wood. I haven’t met an M&E that I like yet, but I have seen some good "starter" flutes in plastic from other makers. A quick search of the Chiff and Fipple forums (or here for that matter) will reveal a lot of threads discussing these options.

A "Beginner" flute should be a good and capable instrument in its’ own right. Anything less and the beginner will give up.

Re: Irish Flute You’d Reccommend to Beginner

I highly recommend the Seery. It is polymer and I only play wood. I had the same idea about wood when I started and I wish I had gotten the Seery. Tom Doorley and Eamonn DeBarra both play (not exclusively and possibly past tense) Serri flutes. They are professional level flutes and affordable. I think they go for about $400. I’m just not sure how available they are.
Get a wood flute later and don’t buy a flute for under $200 for Christ’s sake. It’s not worth it. Save your money. Properly cured Blackwood probably cost near $200 so how much craftmanship do you think the guy is putting into it? How good is the wood they are using?

Re: Irish Flute You’d Reccommend to Beginner

If budget is a major issue I would get Hammy Hamilton’s metal "practice" flute. It works very well, it’s light, and it will take you a good long way. And you can put the money left over away for the next one.

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Re: Irish Flute You’d Reccommend to Beginner

Yes David. I’m one of those who liked the Somers Pratten and spent give or take $1800 to get all 8 keys on mine. Best thing I ever did. I get that the architecture and quality of manufacture, along with the player, have everything to do with the sound a flute makes but no-one has yet to give me a good reason to believe that the material of resonant cylinder is all that important.

To sennaleaf I’d offer that 1) you can’t spend enough money on a flute to improve the sound of an inexperienced player (only time and discipline can do that), 2) make sure the choice of material is for a real reason, 3) be ready to spend around $400 for polymer, at that price they’re all pretty good, and at least $600 to $800 for wood…yeah anything worth having will be that much. Nothing in the $200 range has any hope of being even playable. Some exceptions that I am aware of might include the Hamilton and the Somers metal practice flutes (you’ll still want something else sooner rather than later) and the M & E Rosewood (still made?). The sad truth is that anything less will wind up in a closet joining the other "might have beens" of life. The good news is that at in that price range you can get a flute that you can enjoy for the rest of your life…or at least until you think you absolutely must have a flute with those shiny metal bits attached. As my father used to say "if you don’t have the time (or money) to do it right, where do you get the time (or money) to do it over?"

Oh, and for sure, Welcome Aboard!

Re: Irish Flute You’d Reccommend to Beginner

Another statement here in favor of Gary Sommers flutes. They sound great, play great, and are near indestructible. Don’t buy a cheap middle eastern produced instrument like the mcneela, it will turn you off playing as they are so poorly made and difficult to deal with.

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Re: Irish Flute You’d Reccommend to Beginner

I’ve been playing a silver flute for years. I just purchased Casey Burns’ folk flute. I love it. It is $450 new. If you can’t find a used one maybe save up for a new. I’d say it’s worth it.

Re: Irish Flute You’d Reccommend to Beginner

A $200 flute really costs $600:

First you pay $200 then you put it in the closet and buy a better flute for $400.

Re: Irish Flute You’d Reccommend to Beginner

I have no expertise in what makes one flute preferable to another. I have, however, tried a couple of Damian’s delrin flutes. His budget models are under 200 pounds Sterling. They’re in tune, have a bite to them, and are not hard to blow. Buying one would not hinder your progress, even if you eventually decided to buy a wooden instrument. That’s my tuppence hapenny anyway

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Re: Irish Flute You’d Reccommend to Beginner

Casey Burns has, I believe, more flutes in circulation than any other maker, yet I rarely see one up for resale. I rest my case.

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Re: Irish Flute You’d Reccommend to Beginner

I believe the Casey Burns Folk Flute is the least amount you can spend for a good, entry level wooden flute ($450 USD plus shipping). A friend of mine plays one and she’s happy with it. It’s very popular for those who definitely want a wooden "Irish" flute and are on a budget. You might get one for less secondhand, but I don’t see them come up for sale very often. Or ever, actually.

Note: If the OP doesn’t live in the USA, the blackwood version of the Folk Flute may require a CITES permit on the user end, in some countries. Casey has the proper export permit (more info on his web site). The boxwood version is free of that concern.

Re: Irish Flute You’d Reccommend to Beginner

The above comment ("the least amount") is just not true. There many flutes that can be bought for less than $450, that are also very good flutes. I am not denigrating Casey Burns here. I’m sure that your friend likes her flute very much. That isn’t the issue.
If you keep your eyes open and follow flutes sales on chiffandfipple.com and ebay, and ask around, you’d be surprised at what you’d find.

Re: Irish Flute You’d Reccommend to Beginner

Conical bore is probably thinking about new flutes from the maker. Chiff & Fipple/eBay typically don’t sell flutes directly from the maker.

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Re: Irish Flute You’d Reccommend to Beginner

Right, I meant that price point as a new purchase. I bought my current wooden flute used, although it’s in a different class than the OP is looking for. I have nothing against secondhand flutes!

However, I think buying a used wooden flute can be tricky for someone just starting on flute with no experience and a very low budget. It’s an option that may work better for those who already have experience with wooden flutes, or who have a local mentor who can help with the choice and evaluate what they end up with.

Re: Irish Flute You’d Reccommend to Beginner

A quote from fluteplayer Dave Sheridan on his Facebook feed, regarding the Damian Thompson flutes "The best flutes I have played in this price range. Very strong tone. Some of the top players have already bought one as a spare flute for themselves."

Re: Irish Flute You’d Reccommend to Beginner

Buy a flute made by a legit maker, and save yourself massive frustration (and wasted money).
https://www.irishflutestore.com/

Re: Irish Flute You’d Reccommend to Beginner

I got an M & E as a starter flute. Got a Martin Doyle a few years later.

As per an earlier post, I still love my M & E and still play it. Indestructable and easily fits in the backpack for camping etc ! Would highly recommend.

Re: Irish Flute You’d Reccommend to Beginner

Like an errant cup of coffee, I once left an unkeyed M & E on top of my car and drove off. Haven’t seen it since even though sometimes when I drive by that spot I stop and call it’s name. The thing is still missed. I still have an M & E 6-key (polymer) that lives in the car for dog walks, busking at dusty farmer’s markets, and other more nefarious purposes. I’ve played it on 13,000 foot peaks, sea level swamps, a canoe in the rain, and hot, dry deserts. It goes everywhere and I don’t remember the last time I even took it apart. Yeah it’s kind of clunky, the key work is "adequate", the intonation and volume are "enough". Still it gets the job done and I have no shame when I bring it out. I’ve bought and sold better flutes but this one is my old and trusted friend. I’m getting a little old and clunky myself so I guess we just fit together. A rather well known flute player (I’ll drop no names) played it for me for an hour in my car on a longish drive and I think we both had a pretty good time. I doubt there is a higher purpose. Point is that for it’s incredibly low price the M & E is a great offering and Michael is a kind and generous man. Just thought I’d say that sometimes "enough" has more value than "best". Thanks Michael.

Re: Irish Flute You’d Reccommend to Beginner

For wooden flute I would recommend Eric Juilleret’s for 540€, for polymer I would recommend an M&E for 300€. Never buy anything cheaper than 500€ for wood, never buy anything cheaper than 250€ for plastic, just save your money for a bit longer !

Re: Irish Flute You’d Reccommend to Beginner

The Casey Burns Folk Flute is an exception to the €500 rule for wooden flutes, in fact, I would not put a particular price limit on my judgement. But then I would not be likely to buy a flute without playing it first, and I know enough about what I like to choose well. If you are going for a keyless flute with a tuning slide in wood then I would not be expecting less than €500-€600 new as a lower point anyway.

I also would not say that plastic flutes should necessarily be cheaper! The material is not really that important a part of the cost - the skill and time of the maker matter far more.

Do look at the internet forums for second hand flutes by named, known and respected makers. Read the sticky topics on the Chiff and Fipple forums on this subject. Do not under any circumstances buy a cheap no name wooden flute from a music shop (physical or online) or ebay.

Re: Irish Flute You’d Reccommend to Beginner

Take a look at Copley and Boegli flutes. Blackwood D flute without tuning slide is $495. Very nice entry level flute with rich tone. Listen to sound clips on the website.

http://www.copleyflutes.com/catalog.html

Re: Irish Flute You’d Reccommend to Beginner

Anyone tried the Galeòn Delrin Pratten Irish Flute? Another interesting guy is Tim Adams from Sweden, anyone? I ask also since I’m looking for my first flute. I really want an Olwell, and sure will, but to it’s time. For now I’m looking for a keyless, cheaper flute. I’m in contact with David Copley. I’m pretty sure I can’t get wrong there. But I have also though about Thompson and McGee’s Grey Larsen Preferred. Last, but little expensive, two flutes from the irishflutestore, Peter Noy’s X-Cut and Sam Murray, both keyless and in blackwood. Any opinions on these flutes, one or more?

Re: Irish Flute You’d Reccommend to Beginner

Hello everyone! I need help with choosing up a flute for my little brother for his b-day! Once i played some tunes for him, and he was very impressed. I thought, that he was just kidding me, because i’d made some mistakes while playing. But guess, what did he asked me to gift him on his b-day? Heh)
Me and our mom were a little bit shocked, because Sam (brother) cried every time i was taking him to the piano lessons, and btw that was last summer ;D
The matter is, that i’m newbie in this regard and i can’t afford not to ask advice from much more experienced people! What would be better for 14-years-old boy? With open holes, or not? I play flute with open holes, but i don’t know, will it fit to Sam, because his fingers are smaller, please help! ;)

Re: Irish Flute You’d Reccommend to Beginner

Guys, i surfed internet and found one more or less adequate overview, then visited amazon, and i found only 3 options as for me. I’ll be very grateful if you help me to choose the most appropriate flute out of these 3!
So, here we go:
1. Gemeinhardt 2BLK - this one was found on amazon, it is written there "Student Flute", that is good(or not?)
https://amazon.com/
2. Selmer Prelude FL711 [3rd in the overview] - this one has been "designed for smaller hands", it may be an advantage for my brother, because he is young.
3. Kaizer FLT-1500NK [4th in the overview] - this one is cheaper twice, and may be it would be better to take this one, if there is no big difference. Because if he like playing flute, we’ll buy expensive and good one next year. Otherwise, we won’t loose much money.
overview: https://primesound.org/best-beginner-flute/
Money is not the main criteria, but it’s also important one, because i’m student 🙂
Help, someone!
P.S. if somebody knows good Yamaha for 400$, please write model, because Yamaha in the overview is little bit expensive.

Re: Irish Flute You’d Reccommend to Beginner

This is not really a great forum for the (usually silver) Boehm flutes, but is more targeted toward traditional flutes use for Irish music.

You’d certainly want to avoid most of the odd-named cheap Chinese flutes, whose keys will likely bend out of adjustment easily.

At the low-end of flutes with mechanisms at least usable by a student, the Gemeinhardt is one. Not sure why you’d want nickel-plated, as many people have allergies to nickel. The Gemeinhardt SP is the same flute, but silver-plated, at the same price.

If you could manage a couple hundred $ more, I like the Di Zhao model 200.
http://dizhaoflutes.com/en/content/dz-200-series-international-301
https://www.amazon.com/Di-Zhao-DZ200-COA-Flute/dp/B00KO3WXN0

A Yamaha model at approximately the same price as the Gemeinhardt is the model YFL-222
https://www.amazon.com/Yamaha-YFL-222-Intermediate-Student-International/dp/B01DD4MIPY

You may be able to find better prices by searching, and depending on where you are located.

Good luck.

Re: Irish Flute You’d Reccommend to Beginner

Thank you very much!