Why doesn’t my whistle make this warbling effect?

Why doesn’t my whistle make this warbling effect?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rR3dp8Mnh8I


Excellent playing from this lady.

I have tried before to have the first 3 fingers closed and the fifth doing the trill however it doesn’t work for me. There is no discernible change in sound yet I have seen others do it too on long notes. So how is it they are getting that effect from those finger positions yet my whistle (normal D) doesn’t have any effect?

Re: Why doesn’t my whistle make this warbling effect?

Likely that the G hole (4th as you are describing it) is smaller and lower than your whistle, which combined with the thickness of the wall is creating what is called the cut-off effect, where the vibration of the internal column of air is partly bleeding through that hole. On your whistle, with the larger hole, no cut-off effect occurs and the G hole dominates the resulting note. Try covering the G hole slightly with your pinkie and repeat, and you’ll probably find the trill starts to work.

You could also try using 5th and 6th together, which might be enough.

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Re: Why doesn’t my whistle make this warbling effect?

Oh well if it is just a case of the whistle being different rather than me missing something in the technique then I should just cover the fourth hole instead then and just do like I would with a cut but many times or not quite going all the way down.

It just had me confused because usually they say they the fingering is the same no matter what the whistle key so it appears not strictly true then.

EDIT: Ok; I see putting it on the immediate hole is too much of a cutoff; doing two fingers seems to work as you mentioned, the one finger (as in the original video) does seem to work somewhat just nothing like the effect she is getting.

Re: Why doesn’t my whistle make this warbling effect?

> usually they say they the fingering is the same no matter what the whistle key so it appears not strictly true then.

Yes, I’m afraid you are learning the most important lesson of all which is that with most things in music, the answer is "that’s true, but…"

I mean, if you think about it, it can’t be true that all whistles are exactly the same or you wouldn’t be able to pay vastly different prices for them. Yet they all have the same set of notes and fingerings for that note. But it’s how they respond to what you ask of them that makes them different.

In general, you have to mess around, get to know your instrument’s quirks, and then learn how to make good music with them.

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Re: Why doesn’t my whistle make this warbling effect?

If you’re really taken by the tone of her whistle, I’m pretty sure it’s a Susato (could be wrong). They’re not too expensive compared to what some whistles will cost.

Re: Why doesn’t my whistle make this warbling effect?

By "warbling" do you mean the cuts, or the vibrato?

Both vary from whistle to whistle, and according to what technique you’re using.

Speaking about the air, she’s doing a number of double-cuts. Is that what you mean?

Double-cuts are distinct from trills, though they’re usually mistaken for trills by "classical" musicians.

Re: Why doesn’t my whistle make this warbling effect?

I’m 99% sure that this is the double-cut she’s doing on G in the 2nd octave:

xxx ooo
xox ooo
xxx ooo
xxo ooo
xxx ooo

Just watch her fingers carefully, they move very fast of course.

Re: Why doesn’t my whistle make this warbling effect?

Just watched the air carefully, the only trill (cutting a note more than once with its upper neighbor tone) she’s playing is on B, on which note you only have one cutting finger available:
xoo ooo
ooo ooo
xoo xxx
ooo ooo
xoo ooo

On A she’s doing a double-cut:
xxo ooo
oxo ooo
xxo ooo
xoo ooo
xxo ooo

And on G the double-cut I diagrammed above. You can do double-cuts on F#, E, and D using an upper-hand double-cut, or a double-cut involving both upper-hand and lower-hand fingers.

I do a double-cut on E thus:
xxx xxo
xxx oxo
xxx xxo
xxx xoo
xxx xxo
which as you see is the same as the A double-cut, but done with the lower hand (the cutting done by the index finger and middle finger in sequence).

On the other hand, if you’re talking about vibrato, which is an entirely different effect, here’s a video I did a few years ago showing four different methods of doing vibrato on whistle.

The same player might use all four in the same tune, depending on the note and/or the musical effect desired.

(Sorry about the background noise, I need to make a new video.)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uK9RmMnDuPA

Re: Why doesn’t my whistle make this warbling effect?

She’s also doing single-cuts on Middle D.

The upshot of all of this is that the answer to your question "why doesn’t my whistle make this warbling effect?" is because you’re not doing the types of cuts that she is. The brand of whistle doesn’t matter.

Re: Why doesn’t my whistle make this warbling effect?

"""By "warbling" do you mean the cuts, or the vibrato?"""

I am talking about vibrato. I would have said cuts if that is what I meant :).

A lot of reply there, I will digest it tomorrow, thanks.

Re: Why doesn’t my whistle make this warbling effect?

"Vibrato" has specific meaning in relation to wind instruments, and had you used that term I wouldn’t have gone on an irrelevant tangent about double-cuts.

Since you used the term "warbling effect" I was forced to guess.

Re: Why doesn’t my whistle make this warbling effect?

Well I thought most people know what a warbling sound is and I would never assume people would think a cut sounds like a warble. A cut is just one articulation of a single note whereas warbling is a continuous sound and (onomatopoeic), like ‘wawa’ on electric guitars is, so I don’t know how you would get them confused.

I actually forgot the classical term for it that is the only reason why I didn’t use it at the time but warble, being a bird lover, must have been at the forefront of my mind.

Re: Why doesn’t my whistle make this warbling effect?

I am not sure the ‘all whistles are different’ explanation is satisfactory. Why is it that it seems the norm for it to work by covering the fifth hole only yet it seems only my whistle is the issue? I have pretty much seen that fingering work on all videos where they play slow airs yet only it doesn’t work for me.

See this fellow goes right into it too

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeTO_F9CVzw


Sure a flute isn’t a whistle but they say they are the same fingerings :).

Re: Why doesn’t my whistle make this warbling effect?

For what it’s worth there’s another factor in the mix here and that is the way the whistle is actually being blown at the time the vibrato is being played. You will probably have noticed that there are several harmonics that can be played from any given fingering according to how you actually approach playing that particular finger pattern. Very slight tweaking of the way a note is blown coupled with very high levels of fingering dexterity will produce the effect you desire with enough practice. Such effects are the domain of a rare few players precisely because there are not any easy methods to achieving them. They are the result of superlative ability and diligent, lengthy practice.