Who’s Gonna Miss Me When I’m Gone.

Who’s Gonna Miss Me When I’m Gone.

Beg pardon, one & all on The Mustard Board. I love this Discussing Board & everyone here. I say this with reverence for the house Jeremy built.

The following clip is not typical of an ITM session. In this sessions there is a singer. I know songs are not tunes. However I think the musicians are quite respectful of the music in ways which Irish sessions players may appreciate. I know I do. Hope you also appreciate the music in it’s own way.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uh6cciJNlKE


ps - John Doyle is coming to Chico, CA soon!

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Re: Who’s Gonna Miss Me When I’m Gone.

John’s a wonderful musician, please say hello for me! He’s been to San Diego a few times for concerts with lovely house sessions afterwards.

As far as the clip, great stuff but I guess I’m missing the point.

Re: Who’s Gonna Miss Me When I’m Gone.

Sad title. Nobody much’ll miss me as I have no children. The sister I liked best is gone 12 years back and the one I didn’t much like died 2 years ago in K’wall, Orkney. I may be remembered as a very odd woman.

Re: Who’s Gonna Miss Me When I’m Gone.

That’s very sad, Susan.
(At first I thought this was going to be an Irish-style remix of Anna Kendrick’s song "Cups", but that’s "You’re gonna miss me when I’m gone).

Re: Who’s Gonna Miss Me When I’m Gone.

Michael, I was looking for a clip with John playing a bouzuki so I could ask if anyone knows what make it is. But when I found this clip & just because he is coming to Chico on Friday I liked it enough to share it with anyone who might like seeing it. No point other than to say I like it & hope others do too.

The instrument was in the clip I posted with Doyle singing "Her Long Hair Flowing Down"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c7-bA6oS1sA

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Re: Who’s Gonna Miss Me When I’m Gone.

Oh, got it, didn’t realize that was John in the video until I went to YouTube and looked at the description. Sorry for the confusion!

Re: Who’s Gonna Miss Me When I’m Gone.

I just spent 3 inspiring (and tiring) days with John. Good times! Have fun when he makes it to your neighborhood!

Re: Who’s Gonna Miss Me When I’m Gone.

Yeah, I guess I recognised John Doyle because I’m usually standing behind the really good players. Seriously though, Michael, I should have pointed out that John is playing guitar since you don’t actually see his face.

Here is the video description; "Mt. Airy 2016 - Rafe Stefanini release party for new CD: "The Immigrant Band". Rafe and daughter Clelia fiddles, John Herrmann banjo, John Doyle guitar, and Eamon O’Leary Irish Bouzouki. Excelent CD. I have always liked the sound of a bouzouki in Old Time music ( I own one myself) and Eamon’s playing adds a drive to the fast tunes and a new feel to the slower ones. Tune is on the cd. CD released by YODEL-AY-HEE Records, Ashville, NC."

Mt. Airy, NC is a place some people know for the music but it’s also the hometown of Andy of Mayberry
[aka Andy Griffith]. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xM6ecC1jf9E


Cheers, Reverend. I am looking forward to some good fun! Right now I’m just tired; but it is a good tired.

AB

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Re: Who’s Gonna Miss Me When I’m Gone.

Hello AB, I’m not sure if it was you that was behind the camera but whoever posted the footage of John Doyle at a Chico house concert some time back, thanks a million, it is superb stuff and has had a marked influence on my musical education/enjoyment. Particularly his rendition of "Queen of the Earth, Child of the Sky", really beautiful.

Re: Who’s Gonna Miss Me When I’m Gone.

@AB: Did you figure out what kind of bouzouki John is playing? Interesting that he is doing guitar style pull-offs and hammer-ons which I was once told by very well known Irish musician were never to be used in trad. Of course, this isn’t quite session style trad but still, it’s very nice playing.

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No pull-offs and hammer-ons in trad? Horsepucky!

Yes! Pull-offs and hammer-ons in trad!!!

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Horsepucky indeed. How are ‘ya gonna fake a cut or roll when playing melody on mandolin, guitar, or zouk unless you use a sequence of hammer-on and pull-off? There are few enough articulations as it is, on those instruments. It would be boring if all we had was treble ornaments. Although banjo players might object to that statement. 🙂

Re: Who’s Gonna Miss Me When I’m Gone.

Carl, I have not found out the make of the bouzouki JD is playing. I’ll let you know if I find out.

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Re: Who’s Gonna Miss Me When I’m Gone.

@callison. Oh yeah, there is totally pull-offs and hammer-ons in trad. It really adds to the music, and all tad banjo, mandolin, and guitar players should try adding in hammer-ons and pull-offs!
I’ve also never been told to stop using hammer-ons and pull-offs in my banjo and mandolin playing while I’m at sessions. I don’t know who told you that hammer-ons and pull-offs don’t belong in trad, and I’m sure I’m the last person anybody would take advice from, BUT GIVE HAMMER-ONS AND PULL-OFFS A CHANCE!

Also, trad music (and I learned this the hard way as some of you might remember) includes more than just Irish music. I feel like whoever said that hammer-ons and pull-offs don’t belong in trad music was never exposed to any American Old-Time or bluegrassy tunes. Clawhammer banjo, which is strictly Old-Time, frequently utilizes hammer-ons and pull-offs, and old-time mandolin I’ve played with will ALWAYS use hammer-ons and pull-offs. I’ll let the millions of bluegrass guitar flatpickers in the USA speak for themselves…

Re: Who’s Gonna Miss Me When I’m Gone.

I’ve always thought that Ken Perlman performs some fantastic examples of Irish jigs and reels for 5-string clawhammer banjo. It’s pure melodic clawhammer, so plenty of pull-offs and hammer-ons. I’ve tried to modify it a bit using the "bum-ditty" method, and find that it translates pretty well. I also use hammer-ons frequently playing tenor banjo, but, oddly enough, find the pull-offs to be difficult to execute at speed.

Unfortunately, I’ve never heard a good example of clawhammer banjo being played in a session. I think the rhythms are just really hard to emulate. But, would love to hear an example if somebody’s got a good one!

Re: Who’s Gonna Miss Me When I’m Gone.

@Braden.
Clawhammer is just impractical for ITM. Most notably is that the style requires that you change the tuning on your strings for tunes in different keys or tunes that are modal etc. It’s more complicated than simply sticking on a capo, sometimes you have to tune a string up or down a full step. For ITM, where you typically play a set of tunes instead of a single tunes, the tune can change key, which really screws over clawhammer players who can’t exactly adjust their tuning in the middle of a set. Old-Time sessions don’t do sets; sets are not an old-timey thing. You typically just play the same tune plenty of times, and Old-Time sessions are structured so that they play D tunes for a while, then take a break, let the banjo player tune for a different key, then they play in another key for a while.
So, it’s really rare to find somebody playing clawhammer banjo at an Irish session. That’s why we have a wonderful instrument called the tenor banjo!

Re: Who’s Gonna Miss Me When I’m Gone.

All good points, @Monty. Even when playing tunes within the same key, the clawhammer banjos I’ve heard don’t replicate the right rhythm. However, I do love hearing and playing Irish tunes clawhammer style. It’s got that old-timey twang that you just can’t replicate on a tenor.

Re: Who’s Gonna Miss Me When I’m Gone.

"You typically just play the same tune plenty of times [in OT sessions] …"

As one OT friend of mine said years ago, the rule in OT is: Play the tune about 20 times through. Then, when you get to the end, play it another 5-6 times. Then, when you really get to the end, play it two more times. Then out. 🙂

Re: Who’s Gonna Miss Me When I’m Gone.

Well, for longer sessions, playing about 20 times is fun. But for shorter sessions, you have to really limit it to only 10 times, or else you might end up playing less tunes than you can count on one hand! It’s really tempting to keep playing, unless you’re a guitar player, in which case you might get bored of your D chord.
So "plenty" varies quite a bit. But "plenty" means a large number times how many times you typically play a tune at an Irish session.

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"I’ve always thought that Ken Perlman performs some fantastic examples of Irish jigs and reels for 5-string clawhammer banjo. It’s pure melodic clawhammer, so plenty of pull-offs and hammer-ons. […]

"Unfortunately, I’ve never heard a good example of clawhammer banjo being played in a session."

Was very confused for this by a few moments until I realized you hadn’t heard Ken in an Irish session. 🙂 He does just fine there, but the tuning thing absolutely is an issue, you kind of have to plan sets around that to get everything working out well.

Re: Who’s Gonna Miss Me When I’m Gone.

Does one WANT to be missed when they’re gone? The peace and quiet of the grave shld be good enough, no?

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"The peace and quiet of the grave shld be good enough" …. WHAT? You mean you don’t intend taking your fiddle with you??

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Re: Who’s Gonna Miss Me When I’m Gone.

SusanK, you make the song sound like it’s about a vacation timeshare. Dead is dead. It ain’t the pleasant; all peace & quiet, hopeful grave everyone is waiting for. I don’t know your trip. But if you want to be *completely* forgotten forever & ever, because it feels good now, I hope you listen to this voice of resistance first
(before you’re gone without someone to remember you)…
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5r34Vuc4sF4

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Re: Who’s Gonna Miss Me When I’m Gone.

Gee, mister - you sure know a lot about being dead!

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Hmmm. Not nearly as much as James Joyce, meself 🙂

Re: Who’s Gonna Miss Me When I’m Gone.

@Sol Foster I have not heard Ken in an Irish session, but would love to! I’ve only ever heard him in old-timey sessions or playing traditional PEI tunes solo. I love his older album "Clawhammer Banjo & Fingerstyle Guitar Solos", which has some beautifully played reels on both guitar and banjo.