Scottish lullabies

Scottish lullabies

I should think there must be lots. Oh, "Sleepy Laddie" is a nice one from Orkney. My mind is a bit blank today.

Re: Scottish lullabies

"Sleepy Laddie" is by Allie Windwick, whose main job was with The Orcadian newspaper I think. He wrote quite a few comic songs including "Partans in the Creel".

Re: Scottish lullabies

Lovely Gaelic lullaby, Oidche Mhath Leabh - sorry if i have the spelling wrong.

Re: Scottish lullabies

J Scott Skinner
The Cradle Song

Any number of Burn’s poems are lullabies….sort of….

Re: Scottish lullabies

There is that MacGregor lullabye in Gaelic, about the father’s head having been cut off and mounted on a pike … sweet dreams, darling! Don’t know the title off the top of my firmly attached head.

Re: Scottish lullabies

There are a lot, some traditional, others more contemporary.
Others from Orkney, in Sarah Jane Gibbon’s "Orkney Song Project" book: Orcadian Cradle Song: an old poem set to music by Brian Cromarty of Saltfishforty, and he also wrote "Sleepieheid" for his son. In the same book, The Rousay Lullaby.
From Shetland, the Bressay Lullaby.
And one we learned at school many moons ago - "I’ve lost my darling baby-o".
Jim Maclean’s "Hush, hush" (aka "Smile in your Sleep") which is almost as bloody as meself’s example, being about the Highland Clearances.
"Coulter’s Candy" can be used as a lullaby or nursery rhyme.
"Coorie Doon" - Matt McGinn’s miners’ lullaby.
"Glasgow Lullaby" - Eric Bogle - not really conducive to sleep as it describes the effects of alcohol abuse.
"Dream Angus".
And a couple of Scottish songwriters that I know have produced whole albums of lullabies: Rhona Macleod and Gill Bowman: Just look at their tracklists.

Re: Scottish lullabies

I’m quite fond of Minnie Shirvas’ Cradle Song.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ZzxucvVRqz4

So simple and starkly beautiful.
Shetland but.
Also other Shetland listening pieces like Greenland Mans Tune, Freedies Tune etc.
There’s a Highland pipes tune called the Highland Cradle Song that is nice.

Just the first that came to mind loads more

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Re: Scottish lullabies

Hmmm … the Highland pipes aren’t the first instrument I would think of for a cradle song - but they might drown out the crying … !

Re: Scottish lullabies

Oran Talaidh an Eich-Uisge (The Lullaby of the Water-Horse)
Soontree Lullaby (Jean Redpath)
Sophie’s Lullaby (Phil Cunningham)
Morning Lullaby (composed by Freeland Barbour)
Evening Lullaby (composed by Freeland Barbour)
Lullaby for a Rainy Night (Robin Williamson)
Lullaby for Father (Barbara Dickson)
Ba-Ba Mo Leanabh (Sleep, Sleep, My Child) - check out the heartbreaking rendition by Jock Tamson’s Bairns
Star Lullaby (Johnny Cunningham)
Na Libh O Ho (Catherine Anne MacPhee)
A Migrant’s Lullabye (Alister Hulett)
Taladh (Lullaby) - as recorded by Whistlebinkies
Lullaby O Bhan O Bhan (as played by Bobby MacLeod)
Angus Ramsay’s Lullaby - Iain MacInnes
Boo Baby’s Lullaby
Bressay Lullaby
Fetlar Lullaby
Fairy Lullaby
Cro Cheann T-Saile (Seaforth Lullaby)
Cronan Charsaig (Carsaig’s Lullaby)
Dean Cadalan Sahach (Sleep Thou Awhile) - check out the wonderful version by Ossian
Tàladh Chriosda (Christ Child Lullaby) - many good recorded versions, but Cathal McConnell’s takes some beating
Lullaby ida Mirkenin (Shetland)
Siud A Leinibh (Rock Thee, O Child)
Ho Ho Vo Laidi Bheag (Lullaby to a Little Girl, Sung by a Man)
Oran Talaidh Na Mna-Sidhe (The Lullaby of the Fairy Woman)

Re: Scottish lullabies

Hi meself!

"Hmmm … The Highland pipes"

That brings back a hilarious moment from nearly 21 years ago…

The late, great and beautiful Jimmy McHugh died in January ‘99; well, there was some wake after the funeral at Sharkey’s, a still wonderful Irish session to go to.
My word, there were some players there, and the tunes just flowed and flowed.

One of those present was Iain MacDonald, a great flute and whistle player in his own right, amongst many other skills, but a superbly gifted and brilliant piper.

Anyway, someone asks him to play a set, and out come The Highland Pipes and he launched into a set, the likes of which aren’t equalled too often!
The walls are bulging in and out, sublime piping, and my friend, who had driven me all the way from Somerset, leaned over to Kenny, next but one to me, and asked

"What’s this called?"

Kenny’s reply…

"A wee Scottish lullaby!"

I still laugh at that, all these years later 🙂

All the best

Brian x

Re: Scottish lullabies

Well in Highland piping some of it depends on how one defines "cronan".

There are quite a few such tunes.

My Gaelic (Scots) dictionary gives this:

"cronan, n. m. murmuring noise; purling of a streamlet; purring of a cat; a croon; a dirge."
"cronanaich, n. f. continued slow gurgling, humming, buzzing, purring sound; a dirge; a bass."

Highland pipers who are native Gaelic speakers have long translated cronan as "lullaby".

The most famous cronan is the piobaireachd "Cronan na Caillich sa Bheinn Bhric" (the croon of the old hag of the speckled mountains, called in English "The Old Woman’s Lullaby").

The genre Cronan/Lullaby has continued to be used for new bagpipe compositions:

"Cronan, A Lullaby" by Pipe Major Donald MacLeod (Book 4)

"An Island Lullaby" traditional, second part composed by Donald MacLeod (Book 4)

"Pipe Major Robert Meldrum’s Lullaby" by Pipe Major William Taylor (Donald MacLeod Book 2)

Here is "Cronan" by Donald MacLeod (a native Gaelic speaker BTW)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KgMtHXwYUU8

Re: Scottish lullabies

Some more "Cronan" titled tunes in the bagpipe music index

Cronan Corrievrechan

Cronan Phadruig Seumas

Re: Scottish lullabies

I’ve seen Cronan Corrievrechan spelt various ways, I just looked it up and the modern English rendering is "Corryvreckan" and the Gaelic is Coire Bhreacain.

Re: Scottish lullabies

Some are dreamy and lovely - I posted "DREAM ANGUS" but a member said that Angus was far from soothing. I think the Sandman (in Germany) is a lovely song and zilch that is sinister about that kindly bringer of sleep for weans.

Re: Scottish lullabies

Recognised Dunottar Castle in that clip from Richard Cook, close to Stonehaven on the NE coast of Scotland, a wee bit S of Aberdeen.