Extra parts to common tunes

Re: Extra parts to common tunes

I was working on The Morning Dew today. There are a few versions of the C part and many ways to order the parts, some including multiple ways through the C. I also found a new way to play the A part, thanks to Kevin Burke, but I don’t recall hearing anybody else play it that way. I’m trying to get a setting cobbled together, but there’s almost too much to work with. It’s put me off the tune before.

Re: Extra parts to common tunes

If you plan to play the Morning Dew in sessions just learn the two different ways through the C part and decide by consensus as you play. The two different C parts can actually be going on simultaneously and not sound too bad. I’ve heard that happen a few times.
There is a phrase at the end of the B part that has different ways through it as well but both can be happening at the same time though.

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Re: Extra parts to common tunes

Thanks dunnp. I’ve yet to hear it come up despite being regarded as a common tune.

Re: Extra parts to common tunes

Ships in Full Sail (with the third part)
Coppers and Brass (as in CRÉ1)

Re: Extra parts to common tunes

And what ever happened to the sixth part of kid on the mountain?

Re: Extra parts to common tunes

Hi Pat, how’s it going?

I enjoy playing the third part to My Former Wife, which I generally only hear from pipers.
Rarely hear the third part to Rakish Paddy anymore, but it’s fun to throw it in.
The four part Limerick Lasses is mighty; a lot of sessions just play the three part version.
The setting of Brian o’Lynn which folk call Scully Casey’s is hard to stop playing.
Et cetera….

Re: Extra parts to common tunes

I like the third part to Tenpenny Bit, but no one plays it in sessions. I learned it from Robin Williamson’s tin whistle booķ.

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Re: Extra parts to common tunes

Apparently there are 6 parts to The Mountain Road!

Re: Extra parts to common tunes

@ronan fitzsimons According to Reg Hall that was Gorman´s Magnum Opus/party piece.

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Re: Extra parts to common tunes

I’ve always liked the five-part setting of "The Frieze Breeches" found in O’Neill’s 1001 Gems (#260), but no one else I know plays all five, so it’s more of a performance piece than a session setting.

Re: Extra parts to common tunes

O’Farrell’s Welcome To Limerick, as published by O’Farrell in his National Tutor for the Union pipes had 6 parts, and the 2nd and 5th parts were different. The 6th part being present really makes it obvious that it’s a sort of theme and variation thing happening.

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Re: Extra parts to common tunes

Re "The Frieze Breeches", if it’s enjoyable played in 5 parts, why not play it sometimes in sessions? So that others may appreciate it and maybe learn all 5 parts. I suppose the length of the piece with so many parts could be off-putting? Even so, a pity if it ISN’T heard - just cos it’s more complex.

Re: Extra parts to common tunes

James Morrison’s alternative C Part for The Musical Priest is nice for a change. Graham Wells plays a version of it on one of his albums.

Less common tunes, though, I like the additions of a C Part to both of the English jigs Jump At The Sun and Herbert The Sherbert. Have heard both (without the C Parts) in ITM sessions.

The Connaughtman’s Rambles also has a third part, apparently.

Re: Extra parts to common tunes

Susan K said: "Re "The Frieze Breeches", if it’s enjoyable played in 5 parts, why not play it sometimes in sessions? So that others may appreciate it and maybe learn all 5 parts."

Well, the last time I played it in a session with about 8-10 people (including a well-known muso from Ireland), everyone else dropped out when I got to the parts unique to O’Neill, and I finished it solo and didn’t do any repeats. No one asked about the parts or seemed interested in learning them.

There are tons of beautiful older tunes (or older, but now unusual settings of familiar tunes) to be found in the old manuscript collections, but it seems that hardly anyone is interested in them, outside of a few flat-set pipers and harpers. That’s the kind of tunes that I love the most, so between that and my distance from a session, I very rarely play in one.

Re: Extra parts to common tunes

Some of my favorites, aside from "Rakish Paddy" and some other already listed above:

The late Vincent Campbell of Glentys, Co. Donegal had a six-part Lucy Campbell.
Also from Donegal, various versions of Lough Isle Castle (related to, but different from, Seán Sa Cheo) have three (Doherty’s version) or four (Francie and Mickey Byrne’s version) parts. In fact, if Seán Sa Cheo is considered separate from Lough Isle Castle, I’d call Doherty’s version and Byrne’s version distinct tunes also, but that’s another discussion.
O’Neill’s jig Morgan Rattler (essentially the Cordal Jig) has ten parts.
A lot of people forget that John Morrison of Assynt House, one of my favorite GHB / Cape Breton fiddle tunes ever, has six parts, and instead they play it with two or four. Co. Waterford-London fiddler Jimmy Power played it with two, for example.
The ten-part version of The Highlander’s Farewell to Ireland is fantastic too.

I’ll add more if I think of any - I’m sure I will. Keep them coming, people - I’m really liking this thread.

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I enjoy playing these tunes with 4, 5, 6 and maybe even more parts.

"The Frieze Breeches" is a favourite but this is my party piece here.

https://thesession.org/tunes/3030

although it was originally a Scottish tune "My wife’s a wanton wee thing".

There are many others, of course, including "The Gold Ring" and so on.

One of the reasons why all parts don’t get played is that there are often a variety of settings, order of parts etc. Many players will not know them all and, in a session situation, it’s often best to keep things simple. Otherwise, you will have difficulty getting everyone to play the same thing and/in order unless the players know each other very well.

Take the Scottish tune "The Barren Rocks of Aden", for instance. There are four parts which I like to play. In many sessions, only two get played while in others, it may be parts 1, 2, and 3.
However, quite bizarrely, you can find some musicians playing the tune 1, 2, 1, 3 or some other strange combination thereof.

Re: Extra parts to common tunes

"I enjoy playing these tunes with 4, 5, 6 and maybe even more parts…"

Wimp! When someone asks me to play a tune I go into the East Cork setting of the "Kid On the Mountain Bike" which - in its short version - has 623 parts. It usually ends with the barman asking me to switch off the lights and lock the door when I’m finished. I don’t undertamd why I go to sessions and people start packing up and leaving.

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🙂
That’s why I don’t often start these tunes unless the situation is right, of course.

Talking about "The Kid On The Mountain", one of the more unusual and enjoyable versions I heard was from Beryl Marriot whom I always used to think of as the "Mrs Mills of English Folk Music".
🙂

Re: Extra parts to common tunes

Regarding the Frieze Britches, the first setting is more or less the common 5-part version:
https://thesession.org/tunes/34
This setting (more or less) is a very common session setting. If you’re playing something different, it’s no surprise people sat out. Leo Rowsome and Willie Clancy had extra parts, and there’s a Sliabh Luachra version called Gallagher’s that’s different enough, and if you played either in a session, you’d have people sitting out.

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Re: Extra parts to common tunes

I play a third part to Flax In Bloom (which I thought I transcribed here once, but it’s not in there… I’ll have to see if I still have it, or transcribe it again).

And I heard a recording of Doctor O’Neill’s with 7 parts the other day. I think I need to find that recording, and learn it…

Re: Extra parts to common tunes

I actually noticed that a few people posted different third parts to Flax In Bloom, including Roger Landes, who I got it from originally. I went ahead and made a full tune setting with the third part the way that I play it. https://thesession.org/tunes/748#setting37089