Quick question on theory

Quick question on theory

I am looking at ‘The Oblique’ jig and wish to learn the f minor version of it on my tin whistle. To do this would I have to half-hole the A and B notes?
Thanks in advance
RawWhistler

Re: Quick question on theory

What key is your whistle in?

Re: Quick question on theory

My first question would be, and is, why?

Re: Quick question on theory

It’s a D whistle

Re: Quick question on theory

Half holing is your only option really, apart from cross fingered C, but much easier would be to play the Em version on an Eb whistle

Re: Quick question on theory

Nigel I have a D setting (two in fact)so it just for comparative and learning reasons atm

Re: Quick question on theory

‘Why?’ indeed!
Anyway, playing the Eb, Fnat, Ab, Bb and Db* of the F minor would be awkward, if not impossible, on a D.
*actually, the tune appears to lack the dorian/ minor deciding 6th- D or Db.

Re: Quick question on theory

Also I prefer to use the one whistle where possible instead of chopping and changing

Re: Quick question on theory

Thanks Yhaal House

There isn’t any D or E notes in the setting so it might be worth a gamble (IMO)

Re: Quick question on theory

There are Eb’s!! (last bar A part, first bar B part)! And what about all the other flattened notes?!

Re: Quick question on theory

This tune is in an almost Blues pentatonic mode! F, Ab, Bb, C, Eb.

Re: Quick question on theory

Whoops my bad, it’s early, I didn’t spot those E notes there. I still might give it a try anyways but, yeah, it does look like a bit of a mess for my humble D now alright ( :

Re: Quick question on theory

B flat in the lower octave can often be cross fingered, approximately, with xoxxxx.

I’ve seen people play in two flats on a D whistle; definitely easier with some tunes than others. I think you’ve got your work cut out if you want to make a good job of it on this, though!

Posted by .

Re: Quick question on theory

I don’t understand this talk of flats and blues pentatonic: F, Ab, Bb, C, Eb etc.
The X:1 setting on this site of the tune is in G and it uses only the notes D, E, G, A, B.
There are no F#’s or C#’s so it should be easily playable on a D whistle.
Or am I missing something?

Re: Quick question on theory

> am I missing something?

Yes, the question the OP asked: "I…wish to learn the f minor version of it"

Posted by .

Re: Quick question on theory

Whoops, I should read more carefully. Mea maxima culpa.
But in that case, I’d agree with Loughcurra - RawWhistler should get an Eb whistle.
Normally, those playing diatonic instruments would manage an unusual key simply by changing the tune’s key to match their instrument. I would say that trying to half hole or cross finger a whistle into a foreign key is will is going to make tuning a tad difficult.

Re: Quick question on theory

Playing in F minor on a D whistle is rather like dirving the wrong way down the fast lane of a motorway - although it’s not illegal and it probably won’t kill you. Whilst trying to maximise your versatility on a D whistle is certainly no bad thing, the likelihood of encountering a tune in F minor in a session (even the tune in question, which would most likely get transposed to a more accessible key for session purposes) is very small.

All that said, playing the tune in F minor on a D whistle is *possible* and there is no harm in setting yourself a technical challenge just for the sake of increasing your familiarity yourself with the instrument. In fact, if you wish to, it should be possible to use cross-fingerings† for both A♭ and B♭in the low octave, so that the only half-hole notes are the E♭ and F:
(Top to bottom –>)
A♭- XXO XXX
B♭- XOX XXX


Cross-fingerings may not necessarily be easier than half-holes (I knew a Colombian quena player who could play fully chromatically, precisely in tune with seemingly equal facility in any key, using only half-holes for the ‘accidentals’ - I don’t know what, if any cross-fingerings are available on the quena, but he had no need for them), but at least you have the option.

†It may depend on the make of whistle how well these cross-fingerings work, but I have tried them on a selection of whistles (Generation, Feadog, Clarke, Dixon, Susato, Shearwater, Kilkenny, Sindt) and they are stable and reasonably in tune on all of them.

Re: Quick question on theory

…Interestingly, the cross-fingered A♭ sounds OK in F minor but used as the G# in E major, it sounds terrible (much too sharp).

Re: Quick question on theory

That’s the great thing about whistles, some makes are quite inexpensive, and they’re easily portable.

I carry a roll to gigs that has nearly every key, including B natural and C#/Dd, and I’ve had to use them all.

There are many a set where I’m switching whistles in the middle, it’s not a problem.

Anyhow F# minor I’d do on my B or E whistle depending on the range.

F minor on the Bb or Eb depending on the range.

Re: Quick question on theory

CMO: Your Ab versus G# example is a good illustration of non tempered scales!

Re: Quick question on theory

A roll of whistles makes me imagine a bandolier of harmonicas. Maybe a bandolier of whistles would be cool.