Tech help about making a home video of a tune, then adding accompaniment.

Tech help about making a home video of a tune, then adding accompaniment.

Seen several of solo artists on YouTube performing a tune on one instrument, but also playing an accompaniment on another at the same time in a second video attached to the first.

Question; how is that done?

Re: Tech help about making a home video of a tune, then adding accompaniment.

They are assembled manually in a video editor like Adobe Premiere or using an app like Acapella that automates the whole process.

The manual process goes like this:

You record the first video playing the tune.

You then record another video, for example, a backup track on guitar, while listening along to the audio from the first one, generally in earphones.

You then might record a third video, for example, a rhythm track on bodhran, again while listening along to the audio from the first one.

Repeat this process for as many different videos you want to overlay.

Bring all the video clips into the video editing software and line up and sync all the audio tracks. You can use the audio editing features in the software to adjust levels, panning, EQ, etc.

You then use the video editing features in the software to resize and position each video track to where you want it to appear in the final video and render a final video, perhaps adding opening titles, lower third graphics/text, etc.

Apps like Acapella make this much easier:

https://apps.apple.com/us/app/acapella-from-picplaypost/id924635678

but for complete control over both the video and audio, the manual process is preferred.

Re: Tech help about making a home video of a tune, then adding accompaniment.

Just to add that some finger snaps or other clicks or metronome before hand on each track really simplifies the sync process, especially if you end up recording the audio and video separately 🙂

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Re: Tech help about making a home video of a tune, then adding accompaniment.

Thank you for instruction/help.

Re: Tech help about making a home video of a tune, then adding accompaniment.

What I’ve started doing is recording first on a DAW (Logic, in my case) all the instruments/parts, mixing and and taking a couple of bounces, one with count in and no reverb and one with no count in and reverb. That way I get better sound quality and don’t need a complete fluff-free video take.
Then I film myself playing along to the audio (with count in), a couple of times (from different angles) for each instrument. That way I can use the different angles to cover mistakes. I combine the videos in iMovie (a bit clunky, but it’s what I’ve got) then mute the audio from the clips and import the Logic bounce (without count in).

I’ve notice with iMovie that there tend to be synchronisation issues if several generations are used (you can only combine two videos in one go) or use a lot of editing. So I may have to investigate alternative video editors.
See here (just one instrument - two angles, and note I specialise in fret noise):
https://youtu.be/jWXN6wjFPCY

Re: Tech help about making a home video of a tune, then adding accompaniment.

DonaldK, check out DaVinci Resolve as a video editor. It’s free, and handles as many clips at once as you want. It’s a bit of a learning curve compared to iMovie, but super powerful. I edited the entire concert footage for the Portal Irish Music Week in DaVinci last year, pretty much all of which was compositing multiple videos and audio, and it came out great! (I actually mixed all the audio in Studio One, but DaVinci has a pretty powerful audio mixer too).

Re: Tech help about making a home video of a tune, then adding accompaniment.

Thanks. I’ll give it a go - just not sure how many more learning curves my brain can negotiate.

Re: Tech help about making a home video of a tune, then adding accompaniment.

I tried DaVinci Resolve a while ago now and stopped because the learning curve was just too steep. Perhaps that wouldn’t be true now, as I have a little bit more experience, and I also have to confess that the computer I had at the time only very barely had enough power to handle the program.

But the reason for writing now is to pass on a tip that I think I may have passed on once before. It’s simple, but it can save a lot of time. It goes like this:

Once you’ve decided what your “root” track is going to be (the one that you are going to use to play along with for all your other recordings), when you start recording you make a loud, sharp sound such as a clap, then give yourself a comfortably long gap (15 seconds?) to get ready and start your recording. There are two things to note here. Firstly, if you’ve already made the recording you want to use and didn’t do this, you can in fact easily add such a sound in your audio editor before you proceed with the rest of the job. Secondly, this is not the same as a “count-in”. If you want to do that, you will start doing it after the comfortable gap.

Now when you come to record your other tracks, let’s assume that you’re listening to the root track on headphones so as not to get leakage into your other tracks. At the beginning of each further recording you take your headphones off and hold them in front of the microphone so that it picks up the clap. (No, not that sort of clap!) Now you use your comfortable gap to put the headphones back on, pick up your instrument, and get ready to record when the music (or the count-in) starts.

When you come to your mixing or other “studio” work, it is then child’s play to align the audio as closely in time as it takes sound to travel about 1 foot – trial and error not required!

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Re: Tech help about making a home video of a tune, then adding accompaniment.

"you make a loud, sharp sound such as a clap". Try a dog training clicker.

I keep one with my Zoom recorder for syncing with camera or phone video. Stretchy wrist loop is handy for that.

Re: Tech help about making a home video of a tune, then adding accompaniment.

I find it fairly straightforward synchronising the audio on video clips - just focus on a peak. My problem is that in iMovie, even though the audios (and hence videos) are synchronised at the beginning, if I’ve done some combining of videos (e.g., multiple split screens or lots of transitions) some of the clips have moved slightly by the end.

That might not be an issue with DaVinci Resolve. I’m tempted to give it a try (got plenty of time, after all). My only concern is processing power and storage (I already have quite a few large blobs of software).

Re: Tech help about making a home video of a tune, then adding accompaniment.

I’ve been using a piece of software called Openshot, which is pretty capable - I don’t think it’s quite professional quality but it lets you do all these things pretty easily and has been pretty problem-free for me at least.

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Re: Tech help about making a home video of a tune, then adding accompaniment.

My wife and I are making a St. Patrick’s Day music video in collaboration with some friends for a local retirement community broadcast that day. I’ve used DaVinci Resolve in the past, but found it more powerful, and therefore more complex to learn, than I really needed. Now I’m using VSDC - also a free video editor, but a lot simpler and easier to learn. I usually use Reaper for the audio processing and then substitute the processed audio for the original sound track in VSDC. Reaper is also free, unless you decide to pay them the $60 to ‘own’ it - it’s up to you. I paid them because I like it and use it a lot.

http://www.videosoftdev.com/free-video-editor/download

Good luck, and happy St. Patrick’s Day everyone.

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