How Trad is this?!

Re: How Trad is this?!

An app from one of our members!

Re: How Trad is this?!

He’s a force of nature… he’s using my Hohner Melodeon apps for iPhone and iPad in the B/C configuration.

Check this out on the iPad, what’s funny is he’s running the iPhone app on the iPad. After this I gifted him a copy of the iPad app:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AHk4zF4B3kY


You can learn more about all my apps at:

http://appcordions.com

and specifically the accordions at:

http://appcordions.com/accordions/

Re: How Trad is this?!

Brandon is extremely talented and versatile but is very much the "showman" and entertainer.
I’m not knocking him for that, by the way.

I’ve seen him play live and he puts on a great show which appeals to all ages.

Re: How Trad is this?!

Is that a phone box?


He can play The Bluebell on that phone better than I can play it on a real box!

Re: How Trad is this?!

Good one, Someone at The Session!

I do not always align with his taste in music, but there is no doubt Brandon is an extraordinary, phenomenal player.

Re: How Trad is this?!

Much the same here. Credit where credit’s due.

Re: How Trad is this?!

How trad is this? its not trad.

Posted .

Re: How Trad is this?!

How rare is this… for once I agree with gooseinthenettles, though most likely by a different path yet the end result (our mutual end result) is ‘its not trad’. Agreed, GITN.

Posted by .

Re: How Trad is this?!

Haters gonna hate. 🙂

You’re missing the point.

While other kids in secondary school were setting things on fire and making general mischief, Brandon was obsessed with playing tunes on his phone.

These apps are a fantastic entry point for kids to get familiar with the diatonic button accordion for less than the cost of a soda.

I myself learned to play the B/C box originally from my own app before I ever owned a physical instrument as an experiment to see if the skills transfer from the app to the real instrument. They do.

But, of course, there are those who hate all things modern, and 11 years into this effort I really could care less.

I absolutely know they have made a huge difference in the world with tens of thousand of copies sold while some of y’all whine about how they’re not traditional. You’re completely missing the point.

Maybe some kid sees Brandon play his iPhone or iPad and has the thought “I could do that”. His or her parents may not have the resources to buy a real instrument, but they can spend $1.99 for an app and run it on an old phone or tablet if the kid doesn’t have their own.

That’s what this is all about.

Re: How Trad is this?!

No hate, Michael.

Posted by .

edit: I appreciate Michael Eskin’s prolific musical apps. I’m even willing to consider them part of a tradition. However IIRC those apps were never considered to become integrated into sessions. If this has changed, if sessions are happening with iPhone apps or if the accordion player in the original post has played an app in a session this is news to me. That would constitute a paradigm shift. Until I am aware of such a shift specific to Trad Sessions my original perspective remains as I posted it earlier. More important though I am expressing no hate on this thread whatsoever.

Ben

ps
I may be missing the point. That is valid. I accept responsibility for my comments.

Posted by .

Re: How Trad is this?!

Brandon’s playing, not the instrument he’s playing it on, is as traditional as his playing the same tune with the same style on his real box. Brandon is a virtuoso traditional Scottish accordion player who plays an iPhone in a traditional style better than most real accordion players.

So, what is your definition of “traditional”? Is it a quality of the music produced itself or must that music also be accompanied by strict adherence to specific instruments and practices to qualify?

Or is it like pornography, “you know it when you see it?”. What if you couldn’t see it in this case?

Do I imagine that iPhone accordionists or WARBL masters are ever going to find a welcome home in sessions, definitely not in my lifetime, but they will continue to be tools used by those looking to learn to play traditional Irish music. Some cases, like my “Regulators” app are being used by well qualified players in the tradition to help teach the next generation. While not “traditional” in your definition they are tools in support of the tradition.

The instrument Brandon plays may not be traditional in your definition, but his playing is, whether it’s on a phone or real accordion.

Re: How Trad is this?!

It would be more convincing maybe, if you used one of the great traditional B/C players. Brandon’s actions looks like he’s playing a typewriter.

Posted .

Re: How Trad is this?!

A lot of Scottish accordion players have this style. I’ve sometimes referred to it as being like a "machine gun" with lots of notes flying out very quickly.

He’s very good at what he does though and, as I say, very versatile when he chooses. I’ve seen him live and can verify that.

Generally, you can usually notice the difference in style between fiddlers and accordion players in Scotland and a lot has to do with the dance band V more general traditional scene too.

Re: How Trad is this?!

> It would be more convincing maybe, if you used one of the great traditional B/C players.

Even by your standards, goose, I think it’s a bit rich to moan that someone who is not Irish and not playing Irish music is not playing in an Irish style.

Posted by .

Re: How Trad is this?!

Very similar to the accordion clip. He’s a very good typewriter player but would have liked to hear it played on a word processor.

Posted .

Re: How Trad is this?!

The "typewriter piece" was first recorded almost 70 years ago.
Long before word processors were ever available.

Re: How Trad is this?!

I know, everyone knows that.

Posted .

Re: How Trad is this?!

Do they? Not *everyone* will have even heard it before.
🙂

Re: How Trad is this?!

"… but would have liked to hear it played on a word processor."

I think goose’s idea is that then it would be silent.

Re: How Trad is this?!

Aha, I hadn’t thought of that.
Mind you, it doesn’t have to be… 😉

Re: How Trad is this?!

I want to hear it played on an IBM KP29 keypunch.

That was a gloriously percussive sound. The card feed mechanism had a lovely rhythm to it.

Re: How Trad is this?!

Calum he is not playing in an Irish style, try listening to Joe Burke, Daithí Gormally John Bass John Regan Kevin Keegan Jimmy McGreevy.

Posted .

Re: How Trad is this?!

He’s a Scottish accordion player, playing in a traditional Scottish style, nobody has claimed his style was Irish.

If you’re listing names, you might as well compare him to Flaco Jimenez, because he’s also not playing in a traditional Norteño style either.

So, at this point I’m confused. Some here object to the iPhone/iPad, others appear to object to his traditional Scottish playing style. Probably some here think he smiles too much.

I’m going to suggest to Jeremy that he rebrand the site getoffmylawn.com.

Re: How Trad is this?!

"Calum he is not playing in an Irish style, try listening to Joe Burke, Daithí Gormally John Bass John Regan Kevin Keegan Jimmy McGreevy."

Why on Earth would he want to play in an Irish style when he’s scottish, gooseinthenettles?

Re: How Trad is this?!

He might, of course, if he’s particularly interested in Irish music e.g. Irish connections, attending Irish focused sessions, or even just wishing to emulate all the great players.

However, it’s not compulsory to do this especially if Scottish music is his predominant interest. Also, he can even play Irish tunes in whatever style that suits him too just as many Irish musicians will play Scottish and other tunes in their own local/Irish styles.

Re: How Trad is this?!

Donald I’ll tell you why, because I thought this discussion was about Irish music. Brandon is a fine player.

Posted .

Re: How Trad is this?!

GITN, that’s something you assumed on your own.

Not once is it asserted that he’s playing in an Irish style.

Re: How Trad is this?!

@DonaldK, @Michael Eskin @gooseinthenettles @Yhaal House

To be fair to all, this is an Irish Trad music site, the OP did start with "How Trad is this?!", so it’s reasonable to assume that "Trad" meant Irish Traditional Music.

That said, in the video, after hearing his first 5 words and first 5 notes, it’s obvious he’s a Scotsman playing Scots music 🙂

Is that fair?

Re: How Trad is this?!

That’s fair to me. I absolutely agree, he’s not playing in the traditional Irish style, no argument there.

Re: How Trad is this?!

Very true Jim.

Posted .

Re: How Trad is this?!

Thank you, Jim. 😀

For the record I did say GITN & I were probably on different paths which crossed briefly.
Looks like the paths definitely were different.

Love & Peace

Posted by .

Re: How Trad is this?!

We definitely were, that’s healthy. Peace love and festive merriment with plenty of music 🎶

Posted .

Re: How Trad is this?!

Trad enough. I think it’s brilliant. I expect at some time in itm history, a guy introduced the fiddle in Ireland, and some old grouch playing a whistle carved from a stork’s femur thought that new-fangled box with strings was not traditional enough.

Re: How Trad is this?!

"Do I imagine that iPhone accordionists or WARBL masters are ever going to find a welcome home in sessions, definitely not in my lifetime."

Why not? I’ve played in sessions where (at least in the late hours when the crowd thins &/or in rare though not infrequent sessions) one of the best players joins in with say a precursor to the WARBL & nobody wanted them to stop. It has happened with various, different instruments/whatnots. I’ve been there. We not only welcomed them; we loved it!

Posted by .

Re: How Trad is this?!

@AB: I’m saying this as an owner of a WARBL who has fun with it at home:

The problem with the iPhone accordion app or the WARBL in a traditional Irish or Scottish session is that it’s not an acoustic instrument. These things require amplification to be heard. Something like an "acoustic amp" tucked under your chair, or a powered PA speaker.

The minute you introduce an amplified instrument into a session, you risk volume wars, where just a touch more amplification means every acoustic instrument is playing just a little louder, and it can easily get out of control. Especially if there is more than one amplified instrument chasing each other’s volume.

The beauty of a traditional ITM or STM session is that we play acoustic instruments that blend together naturally in their volume and timbre. No need to adjust volume knobs up or down, and no bent feelings as a result.

Re: How Trad is this?!

Fortunately I have not experienced "volume wars" when playing with a few local players in Irish sessions who do use an amp. That’s just my personal experience (your mileage may vary). I have experienced a number of session "volume issues" but all of those were w/out electric amplification. Sometimes alcohol-induced amplification.

edit: Oh! There was a phase when our accordion player was playing on some sort of "enhanced" accordion.
I don’t know exactly what it is. Suffice it to say he passed that awkward stage & there’s been no relapse of the condition.

Posted by .

Re: How Trad is this?!

The sound, in the samples I listened to, strikes me as rather cold and impersonal. I don’t think it’s something I would like to hear in a session.

But as a learning tool, to get the fingering down while saving up for the real thing, it’s brilliant. It’s a great and important gift to the tradition in that respect.