Snack Time!

Snack Time!

Do you snack while practicing or at a session? I’ll snack if I’m playing a synthetic whistle that can be rinsed under the tap, but not while playing a high end metal or wood whistle. For wind instruments one might be concerned with food particles in the wind way or residue on the tube, for stings getting oils and food residue on the strings or body. What is your habit?

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Eating and playing music are my two most favourite things. I keep them separate!!

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The owner of the local chippy used to bring in the left overs to our session when he closed up for the evening - you know, sausages, haggis, white pudding, etc., and, of course, chips. That was in my accompaniment days, so the fat on my fingers from the food just acted like (I guess) Fast-Fret.

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I honestly am hyper paranoid with food/drink around my instruments. I make sure to wash my hands real good before touching my banjo and I try to avoid touching it with grubby Cheeto hands as much as my small mind allows.

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White pudding is an oatmeal and suet concoction.

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Then there’s that Orcadian song about putting “butter on the auld man’s bow”: watch out fiddlers!

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It’s nice to go session-hiking but if it’s not near a water source and then you get any kind of sticky fruit juice on your fingers…
-Impossible to play a steady rhythm at tempo.

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White pudding is great - much like sausage, but not near instruments!

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But there’s no other pudding that beats a haggis!

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Chip shop puddings are nice enough but you need to visit a good butcher for the better ones.

The best white puddings I’ve eaten in recent years and, possibly long before, were from Duncan Fraser’s in Inverness but I’m sure the product will be good in most traditional family establishments. They do tend to be better as you go further North "Here in Scotland" though.
Grants of Dornoch are good too and Anderson’s of North Berwick(A little further South 🙂 )
There will be many more.

Oh, a slight deviation here. The "nippy sauce"(Nothing to do with our F.M. 😛) which Bill Hill refers too is fairly exclusive to Edinburgh and the surrounding areas.
Everywhere else in Scotland, vinegar tends to be the chosen ingredient for adding to your suppers along with salt, although there are obviously other choices. I always have vinegar even in Edinburgh.

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No white pudding here in south of England. Is it a Scottish (and Irish thing) or also north of England?

Ref original q: need fingers clean to play so no snacks for me.

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And then there’s fruity pudding, served sliced as part of a cooked breakfast. It seems to be confined to Angus and Fife, although I would be glad to know about its availability elsewhere.

And to produce a connection with traditional music, I’m wondering if the only savoury pudding to figure in the name of a tune is The Haggis (it’s a reel). Any other offers?

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You get the fruity pudding in other places "Here in Scotland" too.

While I like dumplings and the like, I don’t think they go that with well fried breakfasts. I’m not that great a lover of those, personally, although I’ll mix and match when I can.. Scrambled or poached eggs instead of fried. I like hash browns, some sausages, tomatoes etc too. Not so keen on bacon or potato scones….
It all depends on how lightly grilled the food is too. Many peoplae seem to like it all greasy and burnt to a crisp but not me.

Oh, I also enjoy a kipper and/or smoked haddock too.

Oh, how about this one, Borderer? https://thesession.org/tunes/13498

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Fried Black Pudding and Laverbread! Very good, Johnny Jay. Any more snack-themed tune names out there, anybody?

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Tune names with tasty bites?

Cup of Tea
Lady’s Cup of Tea
Paddy Canny’s Toast
The Chicken that Made the Soup
Crabs in the Skillet
The Flitch of Bacon
Maggie’s Pancakes
Both Meat and Dhrink
Drops of Brandy
The Glass of Beer
Fig for a Kiss
The Bunch of Currants
Sweeney’s Buttermilk
Aherne’s Egg
Apples in Winter
The Burnt Cabbage
The Bubbling Wine
Basket of Oysters
Bag of Spuds

Also, it helps if you have a Cook in the Kitchen….

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A song I wrote for a friend: “Janet’s Stovies.”
All the Scots here will know what stovies are, but the rest of you may not. The recipe is in the song!

And don’t forget “On top of spaghetti” to the tune of “On top of Old Smokey”.

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Janet has a very strong singing voice which you can’t ignore, even if one happens to be a little "corned beef".
🙂

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Half-way through last Tuesday night’s session at The Honor Oak Pub, Forest Hill, London SE23, as well as us getting a few free drinks, the barman brought over some big plates of chips for the players. Nice touch, well appreciated. There must have been some magic tunes played because the chips disappeared very quickly…..

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How could I forget the Three Scones of Boxty?!

Now my appetite’s up.

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Brochan lom.

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In the US, "pudding" is a sweet dessert, chocolate and vanilla being the two favorites but also banana and tapioca are well liked. Seems "pudding" on the other side of the pond is savory, more like a meal or side dish. Also, what folks in the UK call "chips" Yanks call "fries." Little cultural tidbits like this are fun to know.

Not many vegetarians here, are there?

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The above clip is prejudicial against vegetarians.

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"In the US, "pudding" is a sweet dessert"

That always threw me when I first attended Burns Night suppers here in the US, where the line in the address to a Haggis is "Fair fa’ your honest, sonsie face, Great chieftain o’ the puddin-race!." Then I figured out the difference. And a well-made Haggis is pretty good, even if sheep’s lungs are still prohibited in the versions you can get here in the US.

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When I was a nipper we had our main meal in the middle of the day - two courses, the second one always called pudding, as in "What’s for pudding?". Invariably it would be something hot, baked or steamed. Not many people had fridges or freezers where one could store cold desserts.

When we had roast chicken, relatively much more expensive than it is now, for dinner (we didn’t have ‘lunch’), my mother often made "oatmeal stuffing" which I guess was her version of white pudding. It was, if I remember correctly, steamed or baked in a pudding bowl. I loved it.

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Yes, in Inverness and surrounding areas, a pudding was also the name we used for a dessert or a sweet…
We always pronounced it "poodeeng" up there though. 😉

We didn’t have lunch either and the main meal was dinner or "denner" in the more rural communities. You would have this around the same time as we have lunch today but maybe later on a Sunday around 3-4pm.
We would have "supper" when we returned home after school or work. It would be fairly substantial but not as big a meal as dinner.
I know down South in places like Edinburgh , it may have been referred to as "Tea" as in "Come on in , you’ll have had your tea!" but for us a "High Tea" was a special thing which we usually had when we went out for the evening.

We seldom ate much later in the evening at the time we now call "Dinner"(After 7pm approx) unless it was a treat from the local fish and chip shop, cafe etc. Evening Restaurants were few and far between back then.

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This is veering away from traditional music-related discussion, but very interesting. I grew up in London, but my parents were both ‘Northerners’ (although deep southerners to someone from Inverness) – mother grew up in Liverpool and my father in Bradford (the British part of his growing up, from the age of 14). Our midday meal was called ‘dinner’ and the evening meal was ‘tea’. The sweet course was called ‘afters’ (although my father sometimes called it a ‘sweet’ – maybe a Yorkshire thing). It became apparent, when eating at other families’ houses (perhaps those more rooted in SE England), that not everyone used the same nomenclature – ’lunch’ for the midday meal, either ‘dinner’ or ‘supper’ for the evening meal and ‘pudding’ for the sweet course ("What’s for pudding?" sounded odd to me, since ‘pudding’ was just one type of thing you might eat for ‘afters’.) ‘Dessert’ was only something you had in restaurants.

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Yes! Lunch is often (erroneously) called ‘dinner’ by the working class and northerners! One dines in the evening!
In middle class mid century London suburbia the meals were:
Breakfast (first meal of the day)
Brunch (aka ‘Elevenses’, coffee/ snack)
Lunch (between noon and three pm and a lighter meal than ‘dinner’ and might well be a ‘liquid lunch!)
Tea (tea/ cakes/ sandwiches 4pm-ish)
Dinner (main meal of the day 6pm- 9pm)
Supper (after the pub has closed)

Dessert, ‘pudding’, ‘sweet’ and ‘afters’ were all in use!

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Growing up in the 50’s
No elevenses nor brunch, dinner was midday (ish), tea was evening meal
At school dinner ladies served dinner
We sometimes had some shite called luncheon meat but no lunch.

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We still have tea around 5 or 6pm, whether it’s a snack or "meat and two veg".

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I get the "unavailable" message for both links. Just click on the "Watch on Youtube" part of the message and the vid plays, no problem.

There was (is?) a class element too, as to what the various meals were called, plus regional variations; Yorkshire had its own system I think, as well as its own pudding which is neither a sausage nor a sweet.

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I’m not getting the "Watch on You Tube" option on your link for some reason but I do on mine.

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Tea. Tea has been mentioned here often. We Yanks have a common joke about Brits drinking their tea with "pinky out." Is this a real thing or just a lame, risible jape we have? Oh, and the same with the phrase, "a spot of tea." I suspect there is a spurious stereotype here.

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I think the "pinky out" thing maybe comes from when drinking tea was restricted to the upper classes (tea was a luxury item when first introduced) and they used fine bone china cups with ridiculously small handles which you could only grasp with thumb and two fingers at most. If anyone over here (UK) puts their pinky out now it’s usually as a joke.
For a "spot of tea" I would usually expect something to eat, not just a cup of tea (with "tea" referring to the meal rather than the drink).