RIP Dennis Cahill

Re: RIP Dennis Cahill

Condolences for all that knew him personally and through his great music.

Re: RIP Dennis Cahill

I was afraid that was coming. What a touching tribute from Jimmy Keane on the page. I will certainly play a tune and raise a glass of whiskey in his honor today. 🙁

Re: RIP Dennis Cahill

The most spectacular player; the best sense of timing ever. Glad he was surrounded by people who loved him and thinking of all of them and wishing them strength.

Re: RIP Dennis Cahill

Not unexpected news, but deeply saddening.
We’re all incredibly fortunate that such a complete and graceful musician chose to play this music.

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Re: RIP Dennis Cahill

Sad news RIP Dennis

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Re: RIP Dennis Cahill

Goodbye to a great musician - nothing flashy, just right.

Re: RIP Dennis Cahill

Just picked this up on Mudcat’s Facebook page: sorry to hear the sad news. Enjoyed seeing him and Martin Hayes playing together at Glasgow’s Celtic Connections.

Re: RIP Dennis Cahill

This is a shock – I had no idea he had been ill. I once met him during some down-time at the Feakle Festival, playing mandolin in a quiet pub. He was more than happy to share some tunes with an ‘everyday’ musician such as myself.

Condolences to all his family – and to Martin Hayes, his long-time collaborator.

Re: RIP Dennis Cahill

Terrible sad news, may he Rest in Peace.

Re: RIP Dennis Cahill

AS CMO says above, this is shocking news, and a tragedy for his friends, family and many many musical fans. His musical partnership with Martin Hayes - his contribution was much more than mere "accompaniment" - and the recordings they made together will be remembered and enjoyed for many years to come. RIP.

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Re: RIP Dennis Cahill

Spot on, Kenny.

The front of the dust jacket on Martin’s memoir, Shared Notes, features a quote from the Irish Times: "We’ll surely talk of having seen this man the way others talk of Miles Davis or Jimi Hendrix or John Coltrane."

That may be true. But for many of us (and I say this as, primarily, a fiddler), we’ll talk of when we heard Martin Hayes and Dennis Cahill together.

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Re: RIP Dennis Cahill

So sorry to hear this; but a great legacy of music and inspiration left behind that won’t be forgotten. Among his other abilities I think he did an outstanding job of walking the line between accompanist and co-equal performer with Martin Hayes. As said above, never too flashy; but always interesting and beautiful to listen to.
Codladh samh, Dennis.

Dennis Cahill

A lot of people will probably already know, but an equally large number may not know that
Dennis Cahill passed away on Monday evening at his home in Chicago. Very sad.

Re: RIP Dennis Cahill

I met him once at Willie Week. I was playing in some session at some pub in Mullagh, and this guitarist wearing a baseball cap sat next to me. He sounded as American as I did. We chatted a wee bit, and he said he was from Chicago. He was very, very good. Subtle. Quiet. But his chords and rhythm were out-of-this-world good. Sadly, I doubted that the people on the other side of the session could hear him. It was a big session. Anyway, he asked what I did, and I said I was a PhD student at Edinburgh Uni, studying something useless (I didn’t quite phrase it that way), and then I asked what he did. Nonchalantly, he said he played with Martin Hayes. At which point, I realized who he was. "Holy sh1t," I thought. "This is trad music royalty." I kind of wanted to crawl into a hole because he could hear me as well as I could hear him. But he was such a kind, genuine guy, and he was out having a nice time at some random session in Mullagh with a bunch of punters like me.

We’ll all miss him and his music.

Re: RIP Dennis Cahill

The recordings with Martin Hayes are magical. If Hayes was the soul of that duo, Cahill was the beating heart that set that soul to soar.

Re: RIP Dennis Cahill

I hope Jon Dodd who posted this on FB - or Martin Hayes, for that matter - doesn’t mind me re-posting this deeply touching post by Martin Hayes as a beautiful eulogy to his friend Dennis Cahill:

Dear Dennis, we knew each other for over thirty five years without ever really giving verbal expression to how we felt about each other. Once in a while after a whiskey you might lean your arm on my shoulder and tell me that I was a good guy or that we’d made a difference, I knew what you meant. It would be an understatement however to say you didn’t like any mushy emotional talk, but yet, without ever having to say it, we were both keenly aware of our deep loyalty and love towards each other. That feeling of trust was always there in such a way that we never had to talk about it. We really were great friends, we loved each other and we really had a hell of an adventure.
We started on a musical journey many years ago in the bar rooms of Chicago, we didn’t think we’d ever make it out of those bars to the concert stage, but today the President of Ireland and the government minister for the arts were both writing about the huge impact you had on the world of traditional music. You made it out of the bar scene and on to some of the finest stages of the world. You really did succeed, you pulled it all together into a most beautiful crystallization of your musical loves and influences. Nobody before you had ever played those chords and rhythms with Irish music, in the way you did. You matched the beauty of these traditional Irish melody’s with your own equally beautiful sequences of chords and hypnotic rhythms. Every night we played, we would give it our all, we’d zig and zag until we locked in. Some of those moments were sublime moments where our connection was truly telepathic. There were so many times on stage when you were simply able to read my mind and I hope that you still can.
I wasn’t able to listen to our recordings yesterday as I sat in the airport in Manchester. I don’t think I’d have been able to hold it together if I listened. I heard you slipped away to the sound of us playing “The Lament for Limerick”. You remember the evening we recorded it when we were nervously making our first album in the basement of the house in Seattle. We had already recorded the air Bruach Na Carraige Báine and then I changed my mind and said let’s go downstairs and record the Lament for Limerick instead, we did it in just one un-edited take, right in the moment, just like we did with the Paul Ha’penny set.
It was kind of fitting that I found myself in an airport for many hours yesterday, maybe we spent more time together in airports than anywhere else. We’d often meet at the gate of some connecting flight, you having come from Chicago and me from wherever I was living at the time. I’d be searching for that backward slanting baseball cap in the crowd, or sometimes just your shaved head. Yesterday in the distance I spotted somebody from the back with a shaved head and a black tea shirt, and for an instant I had that familiar momentary jolt of thinking I’d just found you. I suspect that I will be having that experience for some time to come. You might have looked like someone else with a shaved head and black T-shirt, but in reality I never knew anyone remotely like you. You were one of a kind, a very special blend of talent, humility, grace and good humor.
The last time you and I were in this airport it was just as crowded and I remembered you suggesting that we go and find a lounge and pay for a few hours of quietness, you said we deserved it. I took your advice again yesterday and sat there in the quietness reading messages of love and admiration from every friend you and I had ever known. I spent those hours mostly remembering your life and all of the shared experiences we had while touring the world together. Reading messages from those who loved you so much was comforting and heartwarming. It was lovely to see from their messages that the beauty of your chords and music had gone so deeply into the hearts of so many people. Little did I know when we were in that lounge back then, that the next time I would be there, you would be gone from us.
We came from different musical worlds, but together, we made our own world of music and I think we made a difference. I am forever indebted to you and grateful to you for all those magic years of music, friendship and fun.
Safe journey onwards, you got the early boarding again, but I’ll see you at the other end.
I love you
Martin.