Sport?

Sport?

What does it mean when the word “sport” appears in tunes, like “Sporting Paddy,” “I Was Born For Sport,” and…“Sport?” Is it like when Chic said “I think I want to live the sporting life?” Hitting the club and macking on the girlies and such?

Re: Sport?

I always assumed it was a double entrendre but then, that’s what she said.

Re: Sport?

I remember in a book about the history of mountain climbing, some present day alpinist (oxygen, lycra, etc., you know the drill) commenting on the climbers of the Golden Age “What we call ‘technical’, they called ‘sporting’ “.

Re: Sport?

Sport = fun.

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Re: Sport?

A bit old-fashioned, another meaning:
Are you sport? = Are you up for it?
(Often with sexual connotations).

I guess you could use the phrase to ask someone if they want to go out busking, but it’s dangerously ambiguous.

Re: Sport?

The meaning of the word “sport” has shifted a lot in the last couple of hundred years. In a lot of tune titles it simply means “diversion” or “recreation” rather than team games or organised physical activity, e.g. “Around the World for Sport”.

Re: Sport?

A few bits from https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/sport
Noun

2. (countable) Something done for fun, regardless of its design or intended purpose.

5. (obsolete) That which diverts, and makes mirth; pastime; amusement.

14. (obsolete) Play; idle jingle.

Verb

1. (intransitive) To amuse oneself, to play.
children sporting on the green

4. (reflexive) To divert; to amuse; to make merry.

Re: Sport?

It comes into various songs as “sport and play” which is as Atsunrise says. e.g.
“All of the first part of the night, we two did sport and play,
And all the second part of the night, she in my arms did lay”…..

Re: Sport? Sport? Or sport?

As with most words in most languages, but especially in English, the meaning of a word changes according to the context in which it is used.