Tune Pronounciation

Tune Pronounciation

I am in the uncomfortable position of having to introduce Casadh An Tsugain (Twisting of the Hayrope.) Help! Any advice on how to pronounce this would be most appreciated. Consider it a favor to the Gaelic languages.

Thanks
joe

Re: Tune Pronounciation

Ye Gads, it is so tempting to invent something here…

Re: Tune Pronounciation

joe, I think it’s supposed to sound something like a sneeze. (Usually played followed by “Ghiuseagh an T’Cheighiat”)

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I should have known I’d get wize guys here. This is like the Monty Python skit where the Germans have a copy of the naughty German-English dictionary.
“Which way to the bus station” = “Please fondle my bum.”

Re: Tune Pronounciation

I should say that I am not an Irish speaker by any stretch of the imagination. But since nobody has yet given a plausible response to Joe’s question, I shall offer what help I can. I have heard this tune name pronounced by the West Clare piper, Michael Falsey, who is a native Irish speaker (in his childhood, West Clare was still at least partly Irish speaking).

I can’t vouch for its accuracy, but to my ear, it sounded like:

KOSS-an TOO-gawn

There may well be nuances in there that my ears didn’t pick up on. Hopefully an Irish speaker will read this sooner or later and clarify.

Re: Tune Pronounciation

N.B. ‘-gawn’ to rhyme with ‘fawn’, ‘seán’ etc.

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Thanks David. This will certainly work for us West Texans.

Re: Tune Pronounciation

A slight variation of David’s pronunciation, I’ve heard it pronounced as:
An KOSSan SooGAWN
“An” being the article “The”, and the stress falling on the syllables in capitals.
Like David, I am not an Irish speaker so I await correction from someone who is.

Re: Tune Pronounciation

I think -

Cahs-uv ahn tchoo-gihn… or if you want Ulster Irish

cahs-soo ahn tchoo-gihn.


-Pádraig

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’t was Hungarian-English, Carrmuse! 🙂

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My hovercraft is full of eels!

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Three blocks down, first left and then on for twenty metres. Can’t miss it.

(I think you’ll find it’s a bit runnier that you like it, sir)

Posted by .

Re: Tune Pronounciation

Well yes, but what’s it in Hungarian?

Posted by .

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My #2 son once asked me, “How do you sneeze in French?”

Sorry, I’m off task here. Does anyone else get frustrated by tune names that they don’t know how to pronounce? I find that often I can’t play a tune if I don’t know the name of it. I will sometimes hear a familiar tune, but if I can’t remember the name I don’t remember how to play it. Does this condition have a name? A name I can pronounce?

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If you can’t pronouce it or remember it, you get to make up a new name?

Re: Tune Pronounciation

Why not use the translation…The Twisting of the Hayrope? Saves too much tongue twisting…and you won’t, with any luck, have the wize guys putting you right.

Sue

Re: Tune Pronounciation

is this really a cheese shop??

caw-sey on soo-gawn
All my schooling in Irish

In the North…. Donegal ’specially (

the eee at the end of the word is pronounced
as a “u” sound so
caw-su on su-gawn
if you want to wow the audience…. in Donegal speak!

Posted by .

Re: Tune Pronounciation

Thank you one and all. The idea of a Texan pronouncing anything correctly is humorous in itself.

Re: Tune Pronounciation

Casadh An Tsúgáin
Munster: cusug un choogaoyn
Ulster: cusoo un choogaoyn (u as in up)

Re: Tune Pronounciation

So how do you pronounce “choogaoyn”?

Re: Tune Pronounciation

kasə n tu:ga:n’

is the correct transcription, or as correct as the font here will allow. Sorry if that’s pretentious but this is my field… (Irish phonology, not pretentiousness!)

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the one thing, is that in the north, the t’s end up sounding like ch’s

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How do you pronounce: “y‘all needa git ya’lls truuuhk outaheeya, y’heeeah?!”

Posted by .

Re: Tune Pronounciation

Just to clear up some general misconceptions that are appearing here. The t in an tSúgáin is never pronounced ch /t’/, in any dialect! It is a broad /t/ and so will always be pronounced t.

Only slender t’s (i.e. those in the vicinity of an i or an e, have the secondary palatalisation rendering them tch, just like Italian “cento”), an example of the difference would be

“talamh” ground, which has a broad t and is hence always pronounced t.

“teach” house, which has a slender t and may be pronounced tch.

This secondary palatalisation occurs in the Ulster and Connacht dialects, but in the Munster dialects this doesn’t occur as much.