The ultimate case sticker (and seisiún vs session)

The ultimate case sticker (and seisiún vs session)

So, leaving the discussions on stickers’ to-be-or-not-to-be, what would be the ultimate case sticker? I’m thinking of making some of them, and I need ideas… I’ve thought about a small one simply stating "so many tunes, so little time" or something like that.

Another one is "it’s not an addiction, it’s an obseisiún" (with seisiún italic), but I’m not sure about the word seisiún. Would session be better? Is it the same deal as with craic vs crack?

A good one in swedish is "det är mänskligt att fela", which means "to err is human", but the word "fela" means both "err" and "fiddle", so it can also mean "to [play the] fiddle is human". 🙂

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How about "so many tunes, and they all sound the same"?>

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Well, that’s a good one 🙂

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…if you’re a bodhran player :P

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Many years ago I had a Musicians Union sticker, which read Keep Music LIVE.
A cut out the letters with a Stanley knife and re arranged them to EVIL (or you could have VILE).
PP

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We’ve got several at the Salt Lake Piping Clubs online store:

"The right of the people to keep and bear pipes shall not be infringed." (A take from the NRA)
http://www.cafepress.com/slpc.11119092

"Uilleann Piper" (modeled after the famous country ovals seen on car bumpers.)
http://www.cafepress.com/slpc.11079637

and various shirts, mugs, bags etc. Is this similar to what you had in mind?

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The best one I know of resides on the pipe case of a man who owns a 4-regulator Froment Bb set . It’s an industrial-type caution sticker of the sort you might find on a big stamping press, milling machine or some other large piece of hideously expensive, complicated hydraulic or electrical equipment:

"DANGER !

Do not operate without reading the manual first.
Special care must be taken when operating the regulators."

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uillean_craic, perhaps. But I’m a fiddler, so it will probably be fiddle stickers. (I like your piping club website, the sound files are great!)

cthuilleanpiper, that was a really good one!

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Reposted, in the right thread this time…

‘stuck between baroque and a harp place’

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As for the Irish vs. English, it doesn’t really matter. Like "crack", "seisiún" was the way they Irish-ized the English. (My favorite is still the Irish for "banana".) This sort of thing happens when the language is still living.

My own working solution is to use all Irish if I’m using any Irish words, and all English if I’m using any English words, unless there is no equivalent word in one or the other language. I hope to look a little less twee that way, specially since I’m not an Irish speaker.

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I like the "Fiddler Crossing"…

a yellow sign with a silhouette of a fiddelr walking across

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Two of my favorite stickers that I’ve seen on instrument cases:

"Tune it or die"

"Friends don’t let friends vote Republican" (That’s "republican" in American politics - not at all related to Irish nationalism)…

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"We tune because we care."

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Well, maybe my idea is a bit too obvious, but I’m surprised Zazzle don’t do those kind of stickers - you know, the company Jeremy got to do those The Session.org T-shirts, because it would be nice to get a sticker with The Session.org logo (that would of course be spelt "session").
http://www.zazzle.com/products/product/product.asp?product%5Fid=235072874896351977

Would it be possible to get them custom made by a web-based company?

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Cafe Press does them, along with Christmas ornaments, bumper stickers, posters (framed and unframed), CDs, and a ton of other stuff.

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pobe… I was always lead to believe "crack" was what we have in our arses…. entirly different from the "good time" variety the irish gave us ;) (oops just ignore me if I’m being too giddy)

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I know a young fiddler who has a ladies’ toilet sign on her fiddle case….. Could explain the great tone she gets off that fiddle.

BEWARE OF THE DOG!

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EAR PROTECTORS MUST BE WORN

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How about "If you do diddly, you’ll never be idle."

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Well, thanks for some nice suggestions. Perhaps I’ll use "session" instead of "seisiún" (it does feel better, but I think it will become a design decision, I’ll take what looks best).

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Yep - So Many Tunes So Little Time gets my vote. I’d buy a couple of those.

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How about "I commit random acts of violins."

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Or perhaps a picture of Ged Foley with the message, "Ged is my copilot."

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"You have the right to remain silent!"

Jim

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Did something similar many years ago Pied Piper, mine read ‘Musicians Union says Avoid Spoon Players’ still on my old flute box come to think of it.

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How about ‘I can lift it, I can play it, but I can’t sit on the box’

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Pobe, I know of two very good bodhran players who only accompany tunes that they actually know well, albeit in their head.

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"Like "crack", "seisiún" was the way they Irish-ized the English." - umm, sorry, this is not true Zina. "Craic" is actually an ancient gaelic word that has been brought into the English language (not "Irish-ized" as you said). There is no single meaning for "craic", so it cannot be directly translated to English, as there is no single English word for it… it means: good fun / company, enjoyment, fun, banter, often associated with music "(ceol) agus craic"… So in truth "Craic" was DEFINITELY NOT taken from English, but infact taken from Gaelic and not even anglicised, but more brought into the English language, as it doesn’t have a single meaning like the English word "crack" (unless you are crude, or use the "crack" cocaine drug term), so probably best sticking to "craic" ;)

With regards to the word seisiún, I would imagine this also comes from Gaelic word "séis" which means "music" or "singing", but I’m not sure if anyone has ever published this possible link, but that’s my thinking on it. So I think I’ll stick to "craic" and "seisiún" as much as I can. Hope this doesn’t mean that Jeremy has to buy a new domain name :P

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Yeah? Prove it. *grin* "Crack" in it’s English form is traced back to the 1600’s, boyo.

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We’ve had this discussion before, by the way. "Crack" is illustrably traced back to the English, some seaport originally, I think, but I haven’t a copy of the Oxford anywhere…

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Damn you Zina Lee,(he he) I’m gonna have to go and prove this now, aren’t I? I’ll get on to it soon and let you know what the CRAIC is ;)

Murrough

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LOL — guess what? You’re not the only obsessive compulsive around here, I just wrote Fintan Vallely to see if he’ll tell us if he was pulling someone’s leg with his quote in the Companion to Irish Traditional Music or not! 🙂

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Umm… for the moment, it would seem ur right, damn you Zina Lee!!! But I will delve later, but possibly not to much avail! Anyhow, well done and will keep you posted what the craic is 🙂

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lol, oh what i meant to say was that all that I said prior to this (in this thread) would make the "ultimate case sticker"… does that stick? :P

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Hey, didn’t you know that I’m *always* right, Murrough? (That should be read *heavily* laden with irony and sarcasm, of course.) Let me know if you find anything (authoritative) to the contrary, I’d love to be proven wrong — fer instance, wouldn’t it be appealing to find that the reason "crack" can be traced to a seaport is because of Irish sailors? *sigh* A romantic story, but probably a story nonetheless…

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The random acts of violins was a great one!

And I think, after trying, that for a sticker, obseisiún looks better than obsession. But I’m still not sure.

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Stop the press!

Okay, I wrote Fintan Vallely, asking him if he was indeed pulling legs with his entry under the "craic" category in the Companion to Irish Traditional Music, and here’s his reply — enjoy, I certainly did! (And yes, he gave me permission to pass this on. 🙂
___________________________

Zina:

Yes and no … But mostly, emphatically, NO. The pisstake is only a device.

When I asked Caomhín Mac Aoidh (author of Between the jigs and the reels, on Donegal fiddling) what his opinion was, he gave the quote (which is attributed to him) Rather good I thought.

Yes, for the reasons outlined in the Companion article, the spelling ‘craic’ causes serious nausea among intelligent people. This glib spelling of the word was invented in the 1970s - All of the rest of the article is deadly serious (if you call railing against stupidity serious).

The article also makes it clear that it is the context of the use of the (recent, modern) Irish spelling of the word that is the issue - if ‘craic’ is to be used it should be used while writing in the Irish language, OR placed in parentheses or in italics when writing in English. I stress that this is a word which was NEVER in the Irish language (but cráic, meaning arsehole, or creac, meaning herd, are). The original word, crack, IS in fact old English and is still widely used in England and Scotland, and had moved from there to Ulster with the plantation in the 17th century.

I grew up using the word in the 1950s. When I went to Dublin (from Ulster) in 1968 NOBODY I met in Dublin used ‘crack’, but people from down south used ‘gas’ (a corruption of the Irish ‘geas’ meaning spell, or wonder, effectively the same thing). Crack only began to be used with the influx of northerners and in the context of music, it travelled with northern influence (at the fleadh cheoil, etc) until southern people began to believe that they had invented it. Ciarán Carson is particular enraged by the ‘craic’ spelling, so too Desi Wilkinson and many other otherwise tolerant souls. It is used largely by the kind of people who put signs outside bars such as "Chips and beens today", or "New potato’s". But alarmingly ‘craic’ is used by younger journalists who cull their education from pub signs and only read press releases issued by CCÉ PR officers who because of the fact that many of them don’t play actual music (ah, sure why should they have to?) they are obliged to think that at least some of the words that they speak are surely Irish - on account of the fact that CCÉ gets the bulk of its funding from the Irish government’s Irish language budget. Another such word is ‘seisiún’, equally nauseating if used without italics in the English language. The implication of its usage is that ‘seisiún’ in its music sense is an Irish tradition. It is not. It probably started in the USA, and became a feature of Irish music life only in the revival years (post 1952). ‘seisiún’ is likely constructed from the English ‘session’. It should be used properly only as a prefix to ‘ceoil’ (= a music session, as opposed to a drinking session, or a courting session) Originally, anyway, it is a borrowing of the word used for such as a ‘court session’, and like crack, intelligent reason should have demanded the usage of a proper Irish word for the concept of music session.

Someone else, who probably now is a fanatic agin smoking in bars, remarked to me that the English language in Irish journalism ‘had’ to re-spell crack as craic, to avoid confusion with the crack cocaine. Dear me! Using that as logic we should be changing half the words in the English language into babby-irish. I mean, look at what ‘bush’ means - literally and colloquially, And Irish music has ‘the old bush reel’. Which do we re-name ‘búis’ or whatever. Anyway since the drug ‘crack’ is now found on Irish streets, and the Irish language is obliged to keep up with modern trends, the linguists have in fact gratuitously wasted an important word in their permission for the borrow-usage of ‘craic’ - rather a stupid thing since there are dozens of perfectly good and much more expressive words already in the Irish language to describe ‘good fun’. I’m getting nauseous again.

Sincerely,

Fintan Vallely

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I grew up in Dublin in the 1950s and we had ‘great gas’ when we went out on the town. But country girls - nurses and civil servants from Tipperary and such far-flung places - always had ‘great craic’. (I never saw it spelt then.) So, in my experience, the word came to Dublin from rural Ireland which would suggest an Irish-language origin. Dublin, an English-speaking city from the beginning of that language still retains Elizabethan words in its vernacular so if Crack has an English origin, I am surprised that we ‘gurriers’ never heard it before the ‘culchie’ girls came. The Irish Times style book gives craic as the spelling to be used by its journalists in both languages.
That’s a funny thing about language it grows and mutates - just like music.

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Just so you know, the word crack was used in the context of ‘fun’ as far back as 1583. The OED cites an earlier date of 1450. The word passed into usage in Ulster and was used widely there for literally centuries. It was spelled with a ‘K’ when written down, though it was only rarely written down in more recent decades, and more commonly spoken, being considered mere ‘slang’.

A famous recording of the word was written by the poet Robert Burns, in 1785, in his poem ‘Holy Fair’. "They’re a’ in famous tune, For crack that day".

Sir Walter Scott used the word crack in ‘Rob Roy’. More recently, in the 1960s, Barney Rush recorded the song, ‘The Crack Was Ninety in the Isle of Man’. Christy Moore used the same spelling in his cover version in 1978. In 2006 The Dubliners decided to use the Gaelic spelling of the word.

The theme tune to ‘When The Boat Comes In’, a successful TV series on the BBC in the late 1970s, also used the word in the sense of banter in the lyrics. The tune is a traditional English folk song.

In contrast, the word ‘craic’ was not in any Gaelic dictionary until 1987. The Gaelic version of the word though had been used in an Irish language chat show on RTÉ in the mid-to-late 1970s. Back up in Belfast though, the word continued to be used in its original English spelling, and used widely in everyday speech.

There’s another thread on the forum about the word, and someone there suggests that they’ve never heard it used by "any British citizen" (as in "What’s the crack"). Well, as well as having used it and heard it used for nigh on 40 years in Northern Ireland, I’ve also heard it used in Scotland.

Oddly enough, several journalists for the Irish Times have spoken out against the Gaelic usage of the word in English, just in the same manner as Fintan Vallely. So it’s ironic that their style manual suggests the Gaelic spelling!

As someone pointed out earlier in this thread, Gaelic is a living language. It’s adopted many words for our modern world, including a variation on ‘calculate’ for the English word computer. Craic is a Gaelic word now, and by all means it should be used when writing in Gaelic.

So, in summary, the word crack, to mean fun, banter, lively chat etc, was an Old English word, introduced to Ireland (mostly Ulster) through the Scots dialect, and then adopted in Dublin and elsewhere, and added to the Gaelic lexicon in recent decades. Why use a word borrowed from a borrowed word, when the word already exists in English?

As for being confused with the drug, should we change the word for the Moon, in case anyone gets confused with people baring their backsides too? I don’t think so!

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@Ben Steen: Is that supposed to be a rebuttal?

You first link directs me to an earlier post here, in which Edja suggests that the word is not used in the same way as the English word crack.

Had you been paying due attention, Ben, you would have noticed that the word "craic" is a modern Gaelicised spelling of the word ‘crack’.

You would be correct in suggesting that it is not the same in the context "a crack appeared on the road", or crude or drug-related expressions.

As an Irishman (from the same province as Fintan Vallely) and a British citizen, I grew up using the expression "what’s the crack" and the more common "that was great crack". I have also heard some English folk in and around the Newcastle area use it in the same context. "Have a crack at it" is a different meaning of the word (now perhaps falling out of usage?) - many words have several meanings.

Limited experience of something (no offence to Edja) does not preclude something’s existence.

The word crack has, for centuries, meant fun, occurance, event, news.

In the late 20th century, someone people in Dublin thought it might be nice to adopt the word into Gaelic.

And why not?

Except that, when writing in English, I use the English spelling.

https://thesession.org/discussions/5103#comment540637

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Zombie thread!

You’re not likely to get a response from Ben, as he is on Mustard Board hiatus.

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It’s an old one all right! I hope the boul post doesn’t see me getting a skelp round the bap! (I hope my bold post doesn’t deserve a slap on the head).

Anyway, Google knows no age limit. Unless, of course, you specify dates! The Internet is, fortunately and unfortunately, timeless. ;)

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"In Heaven, even the banjos will be in tune."

Another sticker, below that should read, "What? There are BANJOS in Heaven?"

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I grew up in a neighborhood in Seattle called Ballard. Ballard was settled largely be Scandinavians in the first 40 years or so of the 20th century. It was known for a time as Little Sweden. That’s the background.

The case sticker popular in Ballard is "When Lutefisk is Outlawed, Only Outlaws Will Have Lutefisk".

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"there’s no time like the present to be picky"

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Oooh. The zombie thread has come to life……again!

Best sticker of the the years (thank you, Taylor, excellent fiddler): You may all go to hell, and I will go to Texas.

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"Oooh. The zombie thread has come to life……again!"….
Makes me miss Zina .

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What ever happened to her? From reading past posts, wasn’t she married to Reverend? not sure :(

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Lol, dare I ask what’s in the picture? :P

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TBB, it’s the "Where’s Waldo?" book cover photoshopped to read "Where’s Zina?"

These books were popular with kids in the 90’s. They were very busy, detailed cartoon scenes that hid a guy named Waldo somewhere. Great for long car trips.

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FWIW, the series originated in the UK with the title "Where’s Wally?"