Book ‘em, Casey

Book ‘em, Casey

Initially discouraged by the failure of my former polling attempt (see: ‘Desert Island Websites’ from last week), after meditating on the subject awhile, I realised that it was perhaps too ambitious a gambit. So I’m going to try again, with a more modest question: What are you reading, or what are you planning to read as soon as you get the chance?

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Er, books specifically, but generally too, you know?

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"Eats, Shoots & Leaves", author cant remember. lovely, silly little book about grammar and punctuation.

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Right now, "Made in America" by Bill Bryson, "Code Complete 2" by Steve McConnell and "Mord i Myldretiden" by Dan Turell.

Snorre
We tune cause we care.

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Bob Dylan’s ‘Chronicles’. Mighty stuff !! Lots about the early folk-singing days around Greenwich Village.

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Hope & History. Gerry Adams.

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Conn Iggulden - The Emperor Series. Fantastic set of historical novels on Julius Caesars life. First two finished. Have to wait until some point in January for the third to be released 🙁

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I’ve just reached the of System of the World - the final book in the Baroque Cycle by Neal Stephenson. Astounding novel.

Currently quarter-way into Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell by Susanna Clarke, which is such a pleasure to read that I’m forcing myself to stop every now and to prolong the experience. During these breaks I’m re-reading ‘Robert Burns: The Tinder Heart’, by Hugh Douglas, which is rather Phwoar-some.

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I’m usually addicted to Ian Rankin’s Inspector Rebus Series but while I’m waiting for his latest ("Fleshmarket Close") I’m re-reading "I Married A Communist" (Philip Roth). Not the lightest read, certainly very emotionally involving and stimulating.

Also re-reading H. G. Well’s highly entertaining "The Island of Dr. Moreau", one of his less famous efforts but all his hallmarks are there. Anyone who is a "War of…." fan should give it a try.

FMF

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Just finished ‘Spares’ by Michael Marshall Smith - very entertaining bit of sf. Looking forward to China Mieville’s ‘Iron Council’ having read (and been astounded by) his previous stuff.

The most recent non-sf stuff I’ve read and enjoyed has included Dr John’s autobiog, ‘Under A Hoodoo Moon’, and Bill Milkowski’s biography of Jaco Pastorius.

K.

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I’d forgotten Mieville had a new novel out. Perdido Street Station weirded me out so much I had to read Scar immediately thereafter. Right, added Iron Council to the christmas list 🙂

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The next Robert Holdstock.

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The Phone Bill
Waterlog Magazine.
Being Alive (New(ish) poetry anthology from Bloodaxe)

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These days I have little time for more than the news magazines that are stacked on the back of the toilet. After the Christmas rush I’ll get back into Barbara Kingsolver’s "Prodigal Summer." She is my current second favorite author. It’s the next Harry Potter book that I really want to read.

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Count me in with the Mieville fans.

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Snow skiing magazines.

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‘An Anthropologist on Mars’ by Oliver Sacks. Previous to that, ‘Catching Cold’ by Pete Davies, about the 1918 influenza epidemic; and ‘Trawler’ by Redmond O’Hanlon. All of which together make me very glad to be compos-mentis, healthy, and on dry land.

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Q, I picked up the Neal Stephenson "Quicksilver" on whim the last time I had time to browse a bookstore. Very rich reading; unfortunately , I usually only get 15 minutes of reading in these days just before I go unconscious in bed. I am looking forward to a long train trip at Christmas, and I’m sure it will be just the thing.

Right now (for my 15 minutes of consciousness), I’m reading Leap, by Terry Tempest Williams; a meditation on Bosch’s "Garden of Earthly Delights". I enjoy her point of view: feminist Mormon environmentalist

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I’m re-reading Going Postal, which you really do have to read soon, Matty. However, mainly I’m working on Christmas presents, so I’m crocheting in bed (instead of my usual read before sleeping), which I suppose could sound rather exotic but in real life I feel like I should have a little lace cap on my head.

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as soon as i get the chance, i intend to start david starkeys ‘six wives of henry viii’- bit heavy, but gathering dust on my bookshelf. its gonna be one to dip in and out of amongst tune-learning, methinx….

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My Granny Zina, what big doilies you have!

*grin*

Going Postal is in my top five of things-to-get-for-myself-before-I-buy-other-people’s-christmas-pressies list - will probably read on the trip to my folks’ place in Port Elizabeth. Can’t wait!

Batlady, you won’t be sorry getting into Quicksilver, Confusion, and System of the World. They’re extremely dense, but more edifying than Umberto Eco, if you ask me!

With my newly rekindled interest in history, I’m dead keen to get stuck into the Flashman books by George McDonald Fraser again. What a hoot 🙂

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Very sexy image Zina!!

Still reading the Lord of the Rings and they’re still goin through glades, up and down hillocks and over passes. I’m wrecked from readin it! Me feet are killin me!
And The Loop by Nicholas Evans, who also wrote The Horse Whisperer.
The Loop’s about wolves. Has anyone read his latest book, Smokescreen?
I’ve read 3 of Dan Brown’s books in the last few weeks too.
Entertaining stuff.

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reading a good book about James Clerk Maxwell, also a series of police procedurals by Pauline Bell. I’m lookin forward to reading Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell.
There’s a new Maeve Binchy which I’m hoping someone will give me for Christmas, and book by Andrew Taylor set in the Forest of Dean in the 1950’s,which is the latest in the series.

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"Guitar & Bass" magazine…
the ‘Sibelius’ manual - again…
Philip Pullman’s "His Dark Materials"…
Gary Snyder’s "Turtle Island" - a repeated visit…
- and regularly one of the several dictionaries or thesaurai, is that a proper plural, sitting around this desk… I love words and languages…
and sadly, I must also admit to anything I can get my hands on about cancer, with certain loved ones being affected by that monstrous illness…

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Wow, I am also reading Made In America, finally found a secondhand copy recently, I’ve read all his other ones. Also a book called ‘The Calendar’ (David Ewing Duncan)it’s about aligning the clock with celestial movement to bring the whole thing into sinc, quite interesting,Yawn. Just finished Mcarthy’s Bar (Pete Mcarthy) it’s a good laugh if you are not too PC

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At the moment, The Developing Mind (Daniel Siegel), Passionate Marriage (David Schnarch), and the current issue of Conflict Resolution Quarterly. Is there a theme to this….? :- |

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Just finished: "My Dream of You" by Nuala O’Faolin (Dublin), and Losing America (R. Byrd,2004). Beginning "Last Days of Mankind" (Samuel Milnes, 1971)
WB

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‘I Can’t Stay Long’, a series of collected essays by Laurie Lee. He has a gorgeously vivid and simple writing style.

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Latest isues of LIving Without and Herb Quarterly magazines (the first is for food allergics & celiacs). Just reread Monkshood by Ellis Peters. About to crack the Carmina Gadelica (selections from, unfortunately, since the complete is out of print on this side of the pond).

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OK Fiddlemouse, the first is for the first is for food allergics & celiacs.
The second is for incorrigable dope-heads?

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The manual for Cooledit software.

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Rob Grants Incompetence. In a world where you have to employ people regardless of their ability - blind nightclub bouncers, octagenarian male bunnygirls and airline pilots with vertigo!! It appealed to my sense of the ridiculous!!

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i second the neil stevensen books, quick silver etc.

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I used to be the type to devour a book in a sitting or two, but now I’ve got 6 or 7 half-finished lying around the bedside table…. I guess the two I’m actively reading are ‘Just Here Trying to Save a Few Lives: Tales of Life & Death from the ER’ & ‘Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience.’ Hmmm both nonfiction, that’s unusual. Next up, ‘Life of Pi’ (Conán gave me a copy, I suppose he thinks I’ll enjoy some part of it, heh) & for quick giggles when I’m feeling esp irritated, flip to any page in Jon Stewart’s ‘America: The Book.’

Aww I miss this place.

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Alistair-

Have you ever read Colleen McCollough’s 1st man in Rome Series? They are a fun read. There are 5 or 6 books in all and they chronicle the rise and fall of Marius, Sulla, Ceasar, and Octavian. Interesting reading.

I’m not reading anything right now because all my books are still packed up (sob) from moving into my first house (Yay!) I’m hopefully wallpapering the library this week (The cutesy 1950’s old lady floral wallpaper realllllly needs to go) Then I can finally unpack my library and all will be right with my world. I really need to find my fiddle lesson books.

~Autumn

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Ottery,
LOL! Nope, that’s one herb they never mention. It’s a magazine for herb gardeners, and people who make herbal products (such as soaps, lotions, bath salts, tinctures), and people who cook with herbs, and people who do DIY herbal hoome remedies, and so on. Since I fall into all 4 categories, I love it.

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Oh well….

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Dorothy Dunnett’s 6 volume epic tale, The Lymond Chronicles, about a wily Scottish nobleman in the 16th century. It contains lots of historical references and characters, across Europe from Britain toTurkey and back again. I’m currently in vol. 3, The Disorderly Knights, about the Order of St. John and the Knights of Malta. Slow going at times for someone like me who, not expert in European history, must rely on the "companion" book to figure out who everyone is and to look up the many references to songs, sayings, customs, etc. History lovers would love this series.