Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

Hey ya’ll, just wondering if any of you would happen to know the most commonly played chords in…

G major
E minor
Dmajor
B minor
A major

And anything else that is a common key that I might’ve missed [which is a crap load] but just the main keys…

I don’t need anything fancy, just the main chord like C, or F, something like that..

Cheers and Keyboarding,
Armand

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

In major keys, play the 4th, 5th, and minor 6th chords in whatever key you’re in (in D that means G, A, and B minor).

In minor keys, play the major 7th, minor 5th, occasional major 4th and minor 6th. (in D that means C major, A minor, G major and B flat minor).

It’s something like that anyway, and the mathematical relationship is the same no matter what key you’re in. You can do your own chart based on this information, then you’ll remember it better.

In some tunes the B part is in a different key, so you’ll have to switch all of a sudden to a different set of chords. Thinking of it in terms of intervals will help you learn to switch gears automatically.

(P.S. My theory is dodgy and I’m still struggling with the modal and minor tunes myself, so hopefully someone with more experiece will expound on this concept for you soon and correct whatever mistakes I’ve just made).

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

In Major keys, like D Major, you will need D as your home base, and A major, G major, and possibly B minor as the chord changes.

In Mixolydian mode, like D mixolydian, you will need D as your home base again, but your second most important chord will be C major, and then an occasional A major and/or G major.

In Dorian mode (sounds in minor), like D dorian, you will need D minor as your home base, C major as your next most important chord, and possibly A minor.

So, to summarize: Kerri is dead on with her explanations. For the Mixolydian stuff, whatever note is "homebase," like D for my example, just think of that "home" chord, the *major* chord of the note below it, and the other chords that would work for the major keys, like G and A major for D mix. For Dorian, think of the minor chord home base, like D minor, the *major* chord of the note below it, and then the minor chord of the note a fifth up from your home note (like A minor).

Kerri is right though, sometimes different parts switch keys or modality, so then you are dealing with a different set of rules depending on the key or mode. These are just the bare bones, as you requested. Anyhow, I really hope I didn’t confuse you more…I have a tendency to do that sometimes.

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

Armand/Armond/however you prefer to be called -
It sounds like you’ll have a bit of groundwork in theory if you’ve done a bit of high school classical violin. If you’ve got major scales, it’s pretty easy to understand chords from there. If you can extract seven chords from a major scale, it’s pretty easy to understand modal playing and you can work out all of this stuff on your own.

Do you know about root-third-fifth? If so, you’ve got pretty much everything you need to be your own chord geek.

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

Well, you’ve gotten your answer before I showed up, but I can’t help being a smart ass and saying:

In G major the main chord would G; extrapolate.

KFG

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Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

I sometimes wonder if ITM is the best tradition to be learning chord progressions to. You really do need to know your stuff as I reckon it is quite unpredictable (which is what I like), so even the rmore regular tunes played can catch out the unwary e.g. Banish Misfortune with C and Dm all over the place.

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

CHORDS are created by harmonising a scale:
=========

Chromatic scale is all (12) of the notes each a semi-tone apart

D D# E F F# G G# A A# B C C#

The notes of D major scale are.

D E F# G A B C#

To harmonize the scale (which the melody is based) we build chords from the scale.
Start with any note and take every second note until you have three notes together (triad)

Eg.

D F# A – these notes make the chord D major

Two full tones followed by a tone and a half (ie major third followed by a minor third)
D to F# is 2 tones(major third) , F# to A is a tone and a half (minor third)

Take the next note E and do the same

E G B – these notes make the chord E minor

A minor chord is a minor third followed by a major third

Do the same with the rest of the notes in the C scale and you’ll get the chords

D, Em, F#m, G, A, Bm, C#Dim

(C# Diminished contains the notes C# E G– a minor third on a minor third)

The only major chords then from the D major scale are D, G and A– this is where the basis of the
three chord trick comes from.

Note that the diminished chord is rarely used other than in more jazzy applications, and that other than
the three chords trick all the other chords are minor.


MODES
==========

A nice way to think of modes is to view each mode “relative” to a major scale
Take the D Major scale: D E F# G A B C#’

Now start on a different note, making the tonic B (the sixth note)
B C# D E F# G A - this is B Aeolian or B Minor

To form the chords from this scale you use the same method as above, but as the notes
are the exact same as the D Major scale then the chords produced will be the same:
Bm C# Dm Em F#m G A

B minor is the relative minor to D – so the chords will be the same, but you have a different tonic chord (ie Bm)


In the very same way take another note to start with, making the tonic E (the second note)
E F# G A B C# D – this is E Dorian

The chords to harmonize this scale are the same as D – ie E Dorion is the relative dorian to D, so the chords
will be the same but you have a different tonic.

Similarly A Mixolydian is the relative mixolydian to D

Similarly for G major the chords are G Am Bm C D Em F#Dim
And A Dorion is the relative dorian of G
D Mixolidian is the relative mixoldian of G
E Minor is the relative minor of G
And therefore all are harmonised using the same chords as G (but different tonic)

Of course all tunes are different and you may have go outside the box depending on the tune, if you play fiddle already
I assume you know the tunes so you know this already. Also it goes with out saying your ear will override any theory
or rules.

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Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

Whew, how thorough!

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

I meant C#Dim not C# for E Dorian and B Minor

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Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

Hey, what is a diminished chord anyway? I’ve always wondered. And a "sus"?

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

A diminished chord is one that hasn’t been eating properly - it’s wasting away a little bit. Sus stands for suspicious - doesn’t sound quite right but nobody can put their finger on exactly why.

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

Whoa — Conán’s on a roll, everybody look out!

You do so know that, Kerri, you just have to. It’s a wind up, right?

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

Alternatively a minor chord is one where the third note is flattened ie Dm is D F A rather than D F# A. A diminished chord also has a flattened 5th ie D F G#.

A sus chord is one where there is a suspended note. For example Dsus4 has the fourth note in the chord rather than the third. D would then be D G A.

Personally I prefer Conáns answer.

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

Nope, truly I don’t. There’s a big gap there in my brain where that knowledge is supposed to be. Is it the same thing as a 7th? Or something like that?

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

C# Demented is my favourite.

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Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

Diminshed is a minor interval on top of a minor interval
C#Dim = C# E G

Sus4 ios where the third is reoplaced by the 4th

eg DSus4 = D G A

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Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

Sounds like PDQ Bach to me! Bet you play dim and sus chords without knowing you are, Ker. The ones that play with my head are the 13ths and such.

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

OK,. well, not any more. Thanks, alistair.

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

How about Fb dumbfungled? Try playing "The Snatter on the Gate" in that one - you’ll not be disappointed,.

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

LOL — jeez, the board’s hopping this "morning"…

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

13ths are extended chords

Take D7 thats D E F# and C (flattebed 7th)

to extend thte chord add the 13th (same as 6th ie 6+7=13)
which is b

So a D13 is D E F# B

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Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

A 7th chord is one where the seventh note is added eg A7 is A C# E G#. The G# is added to the normal triad.

Incidently A7b5 (A7 with a flattened 5th) is A C# Eb G#. The 5th is flattened but the third is not. It is therefore not diminished - but nobody wants to know that!!!

Personally I prefer the chord ‘B tortured’ - or is that just what happens to the melody players when I start playing? 🙂

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

I play all kinds of chords without knowing what they are. I’m one of those singer-songwriters someone on some other thread was bemoaning - all enthusiasm and no theory.

… except now I’m in the "Ohhhhhh, so THAT’S what that thingy is called!" phase of my development

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

Wow people are cross-posting like crazy here.

Kerri - whether you know the theory or not you are at least using it in practice. For years I did not know the theory at all. I have been learning it for the last few years but I have not really utilised that theory. For example how are you meant to know when you are meant to use things like 13th chords and so forth?

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

I was going to say that !
You seem to beat me to it each time !!!

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Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

Understood. I have a good ear so I never really felt the need for theory before. But then I was trying to "explain" ITM to a couple of jazz guys and they started using all this lingo to figure it out together. After about 5 minutes of that I could see them hearing it in their heads and I knew either of them could just pick up a guitar and start firing away backing tunes in any key without any trouble at all. So I thought it might be handy to know…

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

Sorry BegF. To be fair though you beat everyone good and proper with your detailed explanation. 🙂

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

Yes, i should get a medal of some description really.

It all means nothing though if not applied correctly, and doesn’t beat your ear.

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Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

A holy medal, yes.

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

True enough O Great One. Will we be graced with more words of wisdom from your dais soon - I do hope so 😀

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

What’s a dais ?

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Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

Give me a moment to meditate…. there.

I think I’m like some of you in that I’m not too hot on the theory - but it’s something you pick up subconsciously over the years. In fact I’ve recently started to teach myself theory so I can play from dots but I’m not in a mad rush.

I don’t have perfect pitch except for one note which starts a Breton tune I’ve had in my head for years. Then using relative pitch I can work out the other notes if I need to. I’m not the only person who can do this - a friend of mine told me about a girl who does the same thing except the note she uses is the first from the theme tune to Coronation Street!
Apparently you can acquire perfect pitch anyway.

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

A dais is like a little stage

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

From which one pontificates as if from on high…I’m just marveling that Conán gave a serious answer!

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

I know !
He’s the funniest virtual person I know !

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Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

….I took a serious pill about an hour ago, and it’s going straight to my head. (altogether now)

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

Wow did this topic explode!

Thanks guys, I’ll definitely be referring back here pretty often..

::Takes out notebook to take…. Notes.::

Cheers!
Armand

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

Aw virtual cheers BegF!

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

This is way to lovey-dovey, Conan, I’m going home to shower.

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Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

Too much information! You’ll get the young ladies excited.

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

A virtual shower, not a real one….unless it’s Easter already !

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Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

No not for a while. Ye can breathe easy; the rest of us can’t.

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

ah pants to you !

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Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

Wind yer neck in!

:¬) right, gotta go. Can somebody else take over wasting people’s time?

All the hairy chest

C

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

Q: What do you get when you simultaneously play a diminished and an augmented chord?

A: A demented chord. And that’s how your brain will feel if you try to cram in too much theory too fast. 🙂 So, just learn a little bit every day - and really learn it - memorize it in every key so that you can spell it frontwards backwards and sideways and review it often until it is second nature. After a couple of years of this you will become proficient theory. Now, apply the same strategy to ear training, techniques on your instrument, and memorizing tunes, and you will be a genuine professional musician…………all you need is about 4 - 6 hours a day to rotate through all these pursuits………..

just dreamin………….

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

MMM….. theory!

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

A demented chord - - - now that it’s in cyberspace someone will probably copyright it and sue anyone else who uses it…..

If you try playing it (a diminished and augmented chord simultaneously) you probably won’t be in too much hurry to use it backing up any tunes.

Seriously, though, Armand, there is lots of good advice for you in this string. Here’s another tip: draw out the circle of 5ths like a clock and start noting the patterns of relationships between the tones / keys. While the goal is to memorize all the patterns (families of chords, scales, modes, progressions etc) that you plan to use on a regular basis, the diagram of the circle of 5ths, with all the patterns that you can find in it, can be a handy reference guide.

I have seen web sites that spelled out hundreds of types of scales……..don’t even think of trying to memorize them all. No one tries to memorize every word in the dictionary. Just become fluent with what you need for the music you want to play.

The math / pattern aspect of music is a fascinating, infinite puzzle. It is NOT music. It is one of the tools to use to improve your knowledge of music and your musicianship.

I once had a chemistry prof who was a well known researcher. He said that he had to take his first organic chemistry (his specialty) course 3 times before he passed it. He frequently told us "you must enjoy your studying".

Music theory seems daunting, especially at first. Just keep nicking away at it, enjoy it, and remember, you probably became fluent using a couple of thousand words before you started first grade, so you can become equally fluent with music theory.

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

So maybe math isn’t music, but is music math? I’ve read that people who are proficient in one are usually have an affinity for the music.

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

I’d say music is mathematical, but one does not equal the other.

I’ve never quite felt the urge to hum calculus, though…

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Sorry, can’t help you, can’t play a guitar

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

Not only did this thread take some weird turns, but I am trying to figure out why Armand wanted to know chords in the first place. I know Armand, and while he doesn’t yet have his drivers licence, he already plays fiddle and whistle better than many, and pulls out at least one new tune every week. I guess he may be branching out into accompaniment, in which case I will have to put my guitar up for sale.
Best wishes,
AL Brown

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

Haha, well, we have a keyboard so I’m just fiddling around with it, and since I want to become a music teacher or major in music, I’ll have to know the keyboard anyway! Learning chords now is a plus =] Oh man, I’m getting a set of pipes VERY VERY VERY soon!!!

Cheers and Free Period,
Armand

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

i don’t know ‘what’ chords i’m actually playing more than half the time …

Re: Most commonly played chords in these keys…?

… but after repeated plays (over time), i do get bored with them and have to force myself onto new ground which, beiieve you me, takes quite a bit of ‘force’

”may the force be with you” site-backers