Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Curiosity, really. I’m not asking is it right or wrong.

Although I play in sessions once or twice every week, I don’t go to a lot of different sessions, just a few. Now and again I come across someone whose "participation" in the session is to shout / shriek / yell something like Yeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaaaaaaagh (usually during the B part of a reel). Sometimes the wording is different and consists of a falsetto voiced DDDRRRRRRRRRYOWWWW! and sometimes just a sort of yelping YOUW.

What I want to know is whether this is considered a regular part of Irish Music, or is it an import from, perhaps, C&W music. Or is it just an annoyance? Is there a "right" time and place for it.

Personally I dislike it (usually it startles me, and puts me off my stroke), but is it part of the tradition?

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Definitely not part of *the* tradition - but the nutters do it anyway after a few pints. Why don’t they just go to the pub down the road and watch the f******* Sky sports?

Jim

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Depends on how drunk the yelper is and whether they’re doing it to encourage the player(s) or whether it’s their version of participation. ;) Still, you have to admit, it’s easier to handle than someone deciding to participate loudly and less than rhythmically on the spoons, ashtray, pint glass, or table.

Good morning, England! Now I *am* going back to work.

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Its not part of the tradition.

The contributors are usually the listeners and not the players are they not?

The overall shriek thing is what you see in the movies and what happens when you go to a Dubliners concert!


I’m not a fan of doing it myself.

However when i am playing unaccompanied and another musician gives a little "hup" beside me as if to say "go on" , or as a sign of enouragement, i like that feelin!!

Maybe thats where it started?

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Sometimes, when the session is rocking, and I’m sitting out ‘coz I don’t know the tune, and I can hear and feel everyone synching up, and the mad grins start appearing on people’s faces, and the craic rocks up to a climax… and then just when it seems like the tune couldn’t hold that level of craic for another second, and with a "hep", altogether everyone switches to a rollicking new tune… at times like that, I’ve been known to yelp.

Despite myself, because I don’t approve of that sort of thing either. Dreadfully vulgar.

%7)

Posted by .

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

There is a flautist I know and I dont think I have ever seen him even remotely sober - even on the main stage at Celtic Connections. But he is an absolutely fantastic player. He may be falling around drunk in between and unable to focus but as soon as the flute touches his lips and a tune gets going he develops a fixed stare and doesn’t miss a note!!

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Ooops - wrong thread

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

I think (as usual) it depends on the session, and who’s doing the interjecting. For example, I would consider all the following "traditional" at various sessions I’ve been to:

"Hup ye boy yeh" (to men or women)
"Up Bohola" (heard quite a lot at one particular late-lamented sesh)
"Play us one off the album" (to put off any famous musos who might be around; mysteriously, the response to this involves a certain finger gesture)
"Wuhoo" (especially when someone does a particularly good change)
"Shudup ye gobsh*tes" (said with great affection … I hope)

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

I’ve heard it done for two reasons:

—A punter (non-musician spectator ignoring the TV and actually listening) does it after the first turn of a tune, or anytime during the playing; that is AABB Hup! AABB AABB as a way of expressing their familiarity with the tune/approval.

—A musician who started the set does it to alert everyone that he/she is about to go into another tune—or, after a set, a musician who didn’t start that set does it to alert everyone that he/she is going to start a new set right out of the previous one.

I don’t know if these practices are part of the tradition since the days when it hatched and rose from the slime of the snot-green sea, but I know that the use of these devices goes back quite a bit in time. I like the latter use better than when the musician kicks his/her foot out into the circle. I’ve seen some pits go south that way.

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Well, I think you’re a bunch of ungrateful wretches if you don’t appreciate cries of delight/approval. (Other times it can be annoying if someone shouts too much - too often, agreed.)

Here in Scotland we certainly consider it a compliment to hear the cry which is normally rendered in literature as "heuch!" If I’m not hearing a bit of this when I’m playing at a dance it just ain’t the same. But you hear it at sessions, concerts etc, too.

So that’s the Scots point of view, what’s the Irish one?

Posted by .

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

To add to Orson’s list …

All of these, plus the general yee-hahs, woo-hoos, and other vocalisations are *absolutely* traditional in the neck of the woods I was reared in. They apply punter to musician, or musician to musician …

Musicians there tend not be overly put-off by such interjections, but since Lurgan, Portadown and its environs have possibly the highest proportion of electric-soup-afflicted lachakoes per capita anywhere in the world, the players become inured at a very early stage to dealing with boisterousness/"beer-goggle" enthusiasm/misdirected same on behalf of the punters.

"Give ‘er stick!"
"Give ‘er welly!"
"Let ‘er rip!"
"Tear away!"
"Now ye’re leatherin’!"
"Boys-o!"
"Man dear!"

All of which are - however offputting - infinitely preferable to hearing some massive and massively-blootered punter(s) roaring his(their) disapproval!

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Which is a slightly roundabout and tongue-in-cheek way of echoing kris’s point!

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Isn’t "yeeeeehaaaagh" a calling to cattle in Marlboro Country? Maybe we should find out if our own Marlboro Man (Mr. Harmon) if the Helena Session started this new "trend".

(Sorry Will, it was there and I couldn’t pass it up.)

Deb.

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

In Cape Breton there’s a tradition of vocalizing something like "Yip!" at a particularly exciting transition, like a key change or from a strathspey to a reel.

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

I tried a similar discussion on this subject about a year ago but this one has received much more response. What’s your secret , Dave? 🙂

Usually, it is the listener who does this and it tends to be on the start of a new tune or key change. You’ll also sometimes get a "Hep" from the tune leader during a tune.

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

"Blootered"…. what a truly magnificent word!

The piper at the W. London sessions I frequent, a brilliant musician, has been to known to occasionally ‘HUP!’…. I’ve never been sure if it’s genuine encouragement or a bit of a joke…

Personally I like to hear an occasional whoop of enjoyment… if I was less of an introvert I’d probably whoop myself.

I use HUP everytime I play..I’ve got that from my grandparents - thats how they signified a tune change - or a change in rythm- I got confused earlier on….
""Now and again I come across someone whose "participation" in the session is to shout / shriek / yell something like Yeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaaaaaaagh""

This is what I dont enjoy!

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

I sometimes play with a singer who ‘contributes’ to tunes by roaring out a whoop of delight when he gets overexcited. I think it’s quite fun(!)
Joe Ryan, the landlord at the Elm Tree in Oxford used to do the same. If he got excited by a set, or wanted to convey to the non-participatory inhabitants of the pub (That’s punters to you), that THEY should be excited by this he’d let out a mighty roar, snatch his battered old bodhran from behing the bar and proceed to beat the **** out of it whilst dancing a sort of clumsy jig.
Ahhh, those were the days!

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Those were the days and we were the lads.

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

I’m from Alberta, where "Yeehaw!" is the traditional expression of enjoyment. Originating in the bull-riding tradition, it was used to signify to bystanders it was time to call an ambulance by mimicking the wail of a siren. ("YeeeeHAAAAW, I think I’ve ruptured a testicle!"). Since then, it has come to signify a general good time, and in Alberta we use it enthusiastically and as often as possible, like when the plumber gives us a discount on his rate becuase he’s just won the lottery and he’s only working because he has nothing else to do. Or when we strike oil while we’re weeding the garden.

So, naturally, I yeehaw as much as possible to keep in touch with my roots. I save all my yeehaws until the end of a ripping good set though, and stick to "whup"s "hup"s and "Hey, that’s my pint!" while the music is playing.

I should say I saw evidence of a similar tradition on Inisheer, where Micheal, the piper leading the session in Ned’s would holler "YAHOO!" at the end of nearly every set of tunes. ("Yahoo" of course being "Yeehaw" with any kind of foreign accent).

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Q, the expression on your face right after your yelp the other day was hilarious. Now I understand what it meant.

I’ve heard the "Hup" to indicate tune change, and I thought it made everybody switch tunes much more smoothly than usual.

Posted by .

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Now, are you the one with the ponytail, or are you the one with the chilly forehead? ;)

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

I think he’s one of the ones with a flute.

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Which, Q, or Shrog?

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

in Cape Breton, where I’m from, and in Halifax when all the Capers are out in force to see Cape Breton music… you can hardly hear the music over the "HUP", "YIP!!", "WOO!" and the "DRIVE ‘ER!!"s. Even at "quiet" sessions,someone will say yell something or say something pretty much at every new tune, key change, or if the groove is particularly deep. Makes it that much better in my opinion. Just makes you feel like everyone’s into it. I don’t know how you feel about it, but musicians here feed off the energy from each other and the people around them.
However… long drawn out screams from drunken idiots who don’t really know what they’re listening to gets annoying.

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

I think the "hup" of "pay attention now, I’m about to change the tune!" is different from the "Yeeeeeeehaagh" that Dave is on about. Or am i wrong about that, Dave?

Although i have to say that I once saw a band play where *every* time they changed tune, this one person would do this flat sounding "Awp." sound. Exactly the same way, every time, tone, note, everything. It was fine the first three or six times, but after a while it started driving me nuts…

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Isn’t it what ended Howard Dean’s run for the Democratic nomination here in the states?

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

I thought that was mainly lack of funding?

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

I think "yeehaw!" goes back to the Appellation Mountains in the U.S., and became a tradition in country, western and bluegrass culture in Nashville, which also has a tradition of bull riding and ruptured testicles. If it is a question - "yeehaw?" - it is short for "you know how?" The appropriate hillbilly response is "yup!" then you spit some chaw on the floor.

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

In the group I am in, I am the designated hupper. The hup comes during the last B (or C or D, etc) before the change to a new tune. At a recent performance, I forgot to hup, and only three of the four of us went into the new tune—the hup is a belt AND braces type of safety net for us. Like some people have mentioned above, I think the non-player hups came from hearing the musicians doing it, and thinking it was a sign of excitement, not a musical signal. I find, however, that I kind of like the audience participation, helps kick us up a notch.
Hup!
AL Brown

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Howard Dean was given a mic that was designed to block out background noise because the crowds at his appearances were usually very demonstrative of their excitement. That night the crowd was particularly so, and Dean was shouting simply because of the din he was in. (Any session musician can understand this if you imaging how you might sound if your instrument was isolated after being recorded during a big session in a very noisy pub.) When corporate media got a hold of this footage with the isolated mic feed, they used it to take Dean down. It was assassination by voice isolation. Imagine how many great ITM musician’s reputations might suffer if an isolated feed of their playing was isolated in big session, noisy pub conditions.

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Good thing we don’t play sessions for the DNC, hmmm?

Posted by .

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Boo hoo, Jack. Don’t let your tears ruin that autographed photo of Howard.

Dean was an excellent governor. He balanced the books of this state after a liberal legislature had overspent into debt and kept the books balanced by competant oversight and dynamic leadership. Dean took himself down by listening to bad advice and acting on it.

Back on topic, I agree with kris and Aiden and Al. There are countless recordings with people whooping it up. The Johnny O’Leary and MacMahon and Hill recordings that have dance accompaniment come to mind. In the Appalachians where i’ve played its part of the experience and has nothing to do with tobacco or Nashville. Shouting equals satisfaction in my mind and is the way some people express their connection to a joy that is missing in an often mundane or tense world. To not appreciate it is to be wrapped a bit too tight.

Posted by .

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Laitch — I wasn’t big on Dean actually; Dennis Kucinich was my hopeful. The stuff about Dean is what I read and heard in several analytical programs at the time.

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Where are you on the whooper issue, Jack?

Posted by .

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Bet ya Jack doesn’t DO Burger King.

Oh, "whooper", not "whopper". Sorry. ;)

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

In Frisco they’re likely to anything or one.

Posted by .

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Whooper Issue???

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Gesundheit.

Posted by .

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Oh, you mean the thread topic. Well, It has startled me on occasion when someone does it, and I’ve observed a variety of reactions from musicians ranging from disgust to delight. The person doing the "whooping" sometimes appears to just be trying to draw attention to themselves rather than the music, but most are genuinely trying to show their appreciation. I don’t really mind if it’s the latter.

Hee-who….

I’m with the Cape Breton dudes- it’s a really important connection between player and listener- and it lets the fiddler know how closely they are listening and how well they know the tunes (because most of them are fiddlers too, right?)

Posted by .

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

I had the pleasure of watching Halali perform this fall, and found that much of the whooping was started on stage. At one point in a set when they had done a wonderful (and screamin’ fast) transition between tunes, one of the fiddlers let out a "whooop!", which prompted the other two fiddlers to let out a "heeyaw!" and a "wheeew!". It was rather like watching a strange mating ritual on the Discovery Channel or something, but it really helped get the crowd fired up, and maybe they were just showing their appreciation of each other.

Halali is more Scottish and French Canadian than Irish, and I don’t know how much of it could be considered "traditional", and how much of it was part of the stage show.

I don’t mind the occasional whoop at a session. You can usually tell by the tone whether it was a genuine feeling that had to escape, an encouraging nod to the musicians, or a forced expression sort of tentatively let fly by someone who thinks that it’s "the thing to do" at a session. But I usually find it more gratifying when it is issued by one of the musicians.

Pete

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

I remember back in the late 80s when Noel Hill was playing on stage at our local pub. He had a mic set up to speak into, and he would let out a big "HEY!!!" directly into it every now and then that would rupture your eardrums. Of course it would get a reply in kind from at least one person in the audience, but he was clearly inciting people to do it — or he was getting excited about his playing… who knows. I’ve never asked him about that though.

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

You sure that he wasn’t just trying to get the barmaid’s attention so he could order another round?

Which reminds me of a story… When I was on the air on an FM station years back, our studio was directly upstairs from a liquor store. The phrase "gee, these pretzels are makin’ me thirsty" (stolen from a Seinfeld episode) when uttered on the air, used to make a 6 pack arrive at the studio door within a few minutes.

I’m thinkin’ there could be something to this whooping business! 😉

Pete

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Nope — his glass was kept full by adoring fans.

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

You can only make these noises if you’ve got it. Same with playing into microphones or recording, you need to have it. Mind you, that mystic "it" might not have a lot to do with music

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Yeehaw!

Now wouldn’t that be appropriate for playing "Shoe the donkey"?

Bx

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

One learns so much from this worldwide correspondence.

So - in Alberta, rupturing a testicle is synonymous with having a good time. Hmm….

Zina writes "I think the "hup" of "pay attention now, I’m about to change the tune!" is different from the "Yeeeeeeehaagh" that Dave is on about. Or am i wrong about that, Dave?"

Quite right lass, I am talking specifically about shrieks of delight (?), not musical directions.

As for the musical directions, I have no problem or complaints on that score, although the language barrier does have some implications. Here in Gods own country’s neighbour we still retain some vestiges of civilisation, and the indicator that we are going into another tune very often uses the word "change", although some of the more excitable people condense this into a sort of "Ho!" - but that risks being confused with the use of "Whoa" which is the international language for "stop".

Thankyou all for your contributions in what has mostly been a helpful and informative thread.

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Down in this part of ‘Gods own country’s neighbour’ the term ‘Ho’ is used by the Hip-Hop fraternity as a term of respect towards women …

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

But Mark … is their use thus of the word "ho" traditional?

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

I have a friend who leads a session back in the bog who likes to mutter a few words of feedback after every set. "Loadascheidt" he says, as each set grinds to its halt. The only exception is when, from time to time, some eejit disrupts the flow by asking permission to do an atrocious party piece. At which point, party piece over and done with, he beams beatifically, pumps their hand enthusiastically and says "That was just pure lovely! " His smile broadens, his arm snakes around the offender’s shoulders. "You must come back and do it again when you’ve actually learned it." At which point he motions the session to launch into a new set double-quick before the party-piece merchant gets a chance to hog the floor …

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Oldest profession in the world, so I guess it must be traditional.

*running for cover*

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Is Ho’ traditional? It’s not a question I thought to ask.

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

I’m not sure whether tradition comes into it - it’s just a reflex. Tradtion might account for whether one’s choice of interjection is ‘Hup!’ or ‘Wey Hey!’ or ‘Throw him to the lions!’ or whatever. Where tradition might also come into play is whether or not one supresses one’s reflexes or not. But in a tradition which is closely bound with the consumption of intoxicating beverages, the ability of those involved to supress reflexes is often susbtantially impaired.

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

"….whether or not one supresses one’s reflexes or not."

Is that a tautology or a double negative? There’s surely a proper grammatical term for it - Conan should know.

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

i thought tax-collector was the world’s oldest profession? ;)

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

So, to not not suppress my reflexes - is.. to give in or give out? Or both? Or not?

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

I thought it was "hairdresser".

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

That’s for the morning after.

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

*mirthful nasal exhalation*

Hey, did any of you guys ever date somebody just because his apartment is warmer than yours?

Just curious.

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

I don’t date guys.

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Depends.

Er…everything I wrote and erased after that first word didn’t pass the internal "family site" audit…

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

I thought maybe you were indicating your preference in undergarments, Zina. *smirkle*

Re: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeehaaaagh!

Soon enough, Jack, soon enough… ;)