Fake Accents

Fake Accents

You run into this a lot, Americans sporting this quasi-brogue. I don’t think it’s anything but harmless/laughable/pathetic but a friend of mine just absolutely goes into palpitations when he encounters it. I’m more cynical I guess.
So what’s up with these cushla mahone farkers? Some of you I’m sure have phony accents, perhaps you can elucidate for the rest of us. Why are you doing that? Shame? Slumming? Posing? Blow to the head?
I heard about a certain Waterford musician sporting a Clare accent to get gigs. Really. Sort of the equivalent of those Vermonters whipping out the twang to sing George Jones songs. Also a local radio personality reportedly has devised a whole fantasy background, which has worked even with authentic Irish people.

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Whale oil beef hooked, y’all!

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ha ha kevin crawford orginally from birmingham

john mcevoy orginal from birmingham

must be a brummy thing

I live in Ireland now although my mum and dad are Irish I never put on an accent my mum and dad lived in england for 25 years never once lost the irish accent.

I think its done on person, could be to fit in, crawfords accent is embarresing though,

I mean come on is he not embarrased? ahhhhh

🙂

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sorry that was supposed to say done on purpose.

ooooppps

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Being from Boston where we "pahk the cah in Hahvahd yahd" singing with this drawl can kill any song. Therefore, Bostonians usually add strong R’s , southern twangs for bluegrass, and brogues for Celtic music etc. It seems that listening to recordings of people singing with the brogue is not easily turned into natural Bostonian by stripping out the Rs. It gets ruined. For instance:
take the first line of "The Cliffs of Doneen".

"You may travel FAHH FAHH from yah own native land" Yuk.

Besides there are so many Irish citizens in Boston, it just rubs off. Can’t help it. It’s grand.

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I do it. There’s no design to it. It "just happens" in the process of trying to communicate with locals. Gradually my "t"s stop sounding like "d"s and I stop using Canadian words like "gaunch" and "two-four" due to their sheer uselessness.

Maybe I met your friend on Inisheer, because there was one jackass who wouldn’t stop taking the p*ss (in a mean way, not a funny way) because of what he called my attempt to pass as an Irish person. If i could have faked a Canadian accent at the time to get him off my back, I would have, but I couldn’t remember how it was supposed to sound.

I was recently accused of having a Quebecois accent and I don’t even speak French.

So lay off, will you? Travel around a bit and watch it happening to yourself before you start jeering at people who are easily influenced by accents. Sheesh.

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Are you talking about affecting accents while performing, i.e., as part of the stage patter? Or do you mean in normal conversation?

I had a friend, with definitive Scottish heritage but as American as can be, who would often put on a Scots accent when his group performed. It was rather embarassing, frankly, because none of the other band members (also all Americans) tried to speak with a brogue. Fortunately, a family friend, who happened to be a professional in the performing arts biz, saw the group in concert and one of her first assessments was, "Lose the accent!"

Singing sometimes poses somewhat of a challenge, though, if you do songs that feature or are built around dialect. One bit of advice I got early on when I started playing Irish/British Isles trad folk was that I should aim for a "mid-Atlantic accent." In other words, wherever possible, don’t manufacture a Irish/Scots/Geordie etc. voice, with the exception of certain distinct phrases — e.g. "I’ll always be your gra macree"(sp?)

This approach is not without some controversy. People may rightfully argue that mid-Atlanticizing such songs dilutes their original character — kind of like a white suburban choral group performing a Mississippi Delta blues number. But the fact is, for centuries, songs have moved back and forth between communities, regions, countries and taken on new forms.

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For songs, I make an effort to sing them as I learned them, accent and all. (If I learn from someone from, say Ayrshire or Belfast, I have no choice but to tone it down a bit of course, or it would sound ridiculous).

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Ah cannae shake aff ma sweaty accent. No thit ah’d waant tae ennywye.

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You ought to come to Belgium and hear some of the singers singing in fake Irish accents.It always brightens up a session for me,although I’ve come across some good singers.Misheard lyrics can be a source of fun too.I was at a session years ago and two guys sang "The Tamosher",and they’d learned it from a Battlefield Band album.
The chorus begins,
"He gave to her the tamosher,to wear the starched gown……….."
Now starched in this song is pronounced in the old way,starch-ed,and they sang,
"He gave to her the tamosher,to wear the starship gown………."

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When we Irish sing with American accents, we’re not that bad. On the other hand, when the yanks sing with Irish accents, it’s hmmm funny to say the least…No offence guys

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I’m blessed with a lovely broad Lancastrian accent (think Fred the butcher off Coronation Street), and so singing ANY song is at best a hazardous exercise, so I have to admit to using a sort of "mid-atlantic" accent when singing.

My pretend irish accent is rubbish, sounds like Father Jack. Not great for singing.

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Actually, Irish people *are* rather funny when putting on American accents. You just don’t *think* you sound bad because you don’t really know what it *should* sound like. Know what I’m saying?

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I don’t know, flauta.

Years of listening to all the phoney American accents from Irish C&W singers on RTE put me off that kind of music - even the authentic version - for life.

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And what about our lovely french accent ????

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Your French accent is indeed lovely.

What really annoys me about the people with fake brogues are the cloth caps. It’s a wonderfully useful hat, but in N. America it says "Hi, I think I’m like, Oirish, but really I’m without a clue."

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Okay, think about this. We have all trained our brains to listen and pick up tunes on the fly; why is it such a surprise that our speech patterns go amok? I was born and raised on the prairies of Illinois and thus have the perfect Radio Voice; bland. But sit me down with a bowl of popcorn and the complete set of Upstairs,Downstairs DVDs and I’ll be going on holiday to the seaside in no time at all.

And yeah, sorry. Kerri’s right: your fake American accents are as bad as our fake Irish….. As for French; whew, forget it… 😀

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I met this American dude in Doolin who was wearing one of those caps, earthtone tweeds and khakis, lots of green, very color co-ordinated, pipe and all. I said "So what brings you over to Ireland?" and he said "Ah, sure, but it’s the music! I love the music! I’m off to the sessions tonight!"

Skip ahead about 6 hours:

me: "So, how are you enjoying the music?"
buddy: "I hate it! It’s all this deedle deedle deedle crap. Why can’t they sing some songs?"

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[Sensation of crawling flesh}

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haha, kerri, thats a lovely story. im sure he was wanting danny boy and wild rover all night. ah well.

im a singer, sing in an irish trad-rock band. as much as i honestly try to sing without any accent, i do sometimes find myself slipping into a slight brogue every once in a while, especially while performing when i cant think as much.

the reason?

i learned all these songs by listening to the recordings - dubliners, tommy makem & the clancy bros, etc - and my mind just completely stores them with the accent. since i rather easily slip in and out of accents, it will sometimes just happen, even when im making a real effort not to. at the same time, ill never fake it for effect’s sake. it really just cheapens the beauty of the music.

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Just to comment on speach patterns- I used to go Holy Loch and work on submarines for a month at a time. I’d get home to the States and have this Scottish burr in my voice for about a week. It happens when I go to Mississippi as well. I come home and start having supper( dinner-can”t remember which is which) at noon and saying "ya’ll" every so often. Stuff happens…

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There’s a difference between slipping into an accent and putting it on on purpose. Now there are a few people that can mimic accents perfectly, but there’s nothing more annoying (or hilarious, depending on circumstance) than somebody deliberately trying to pull off an accent and failing miserably. For the same reason I hate singing the kinds of songs that go "ach, mother, dear mother look pleasant and smile, sure I’ve axed ye for nuttin this terrible while, there’s a taypot beyond….." You get the message.

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I say "y’all" from time to time myself and I’ve never been south of Seattle. Certain terms that only exist in one dialect are really catchy - it wouldn’t be unusual for me to say something like "y’all are a bunch of tossers ‘osti!" or "Tabernac, this is plat. Let’s grab a two-four and go snog in the back forty, eh?"

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Y’all is a perfectly good use of the English language meaning the plural of you. No doubt the origins are in the original language and kept in the Southern Dialect. (Vous and Nous in French, etc.) But what really torques me is the ignorant use of the form as a singular pronoun. Y’all (or you all) always refers to two or more people. <G>

Mike Keyes
http://www.banjosessions.com/jun05/woodchoppers.html
Raised in Tennessee and lost the rest of the accent due to education. Sort of.

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Southern US woman to Northern US woman at a social event:
"So, where are y’all from?"
"I’m from a place where we don’t end sentences with a preposition".
"I see - well, where are y’all from, bitch?"

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Imitation is the highest form of flattery. You should be honored.

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Actually, Ian, it’s fairly common for U.S. Northerners, particularly those from the upper Midwest, to end their sentences with prepositions. Like, "I’m going to the store—you wanna come with?" We do it all the time.


As for Americans putting on Irish accents—I used to be friends with a girl here in Chicago who does that a lot, puts on an Irish accent whenever she’s around Irish people (at a pub, a fleadh, whatever). She’s born and bred in Chicago, but her parents are Irish speakers from Connemara. So you might say, "Oh so that explains the on-and-off Irish accent. She probably unconsciously picks it up from her parents." Which would indeed be a reasonable explanation for her fake accent. Only problem is that the accent she always lapses into is a Northern one, not a Western one. Maybe she simply finds a Northern accent easier to imitate (pretty much all you gotta do is make everything you say sound like a question). But I think it’s ‘cuz the local she hung out in is almost entirely populated with people from Tyrone, and she was just trying to fit in. (And there I go again, ending my sentences with a prep.)

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There’s a girl from Warkworth in Northumberland who sings in a reet good Barnsley Kate Rusby accent. Turns out she was taught by Sandra "Luvvie Darling", Kerr, an authority on traditional Northumbrian middle class wimmin’s choirs…….from London!

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Creatur - you said it right there - if everyone she’s been talking to is from Tyrone, how do you expect her to pick up a Connemara accent while she’s talking to them?

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I agree with Kerri and Batlady—if Irish people only knew how bad they are themselves at imitating American accents.

When I first moved to Ireland, I lived with a family with 7 kids. The 2nd youngest daughter was about 10 at the time, and she followed me around a lot my first couple weeks there. She was a really nice, bright little girl, so I didn’t mind her tagging along and talking to me, but I noticed that she had this really weird way of talking sometimes. Not all the time, just sometimes. It’s hard to explain exactly how she talked, but her speech would kinda slow down and it would sound as if she was talking out of the side of her mouth or chewing on food or something. And I would wonder if something was wrong with her, if she had some kind of speech impediment or learning disability, but I was too polite to ask. A couple weeks went by before I figured out that she was actually trying to imitate my American accent, but was doing a really crappy impression.

Granted, this is a 10-year old I’m talking about. But as time went on, I met a fair share of grown-ups who couldn’t do an American accent for sh*t, but were convinced (of course) they had it dead on. One problem I noticed with Irish people trying to sound American is that they always tend to shoot for a Southern U.S. accent, even when the American they’re trying to tease or slag might come from Cleveland or Minneapolis. Another thing is that lots of Irish people trying to sound American end up sounding more like (and I really don’t mean for this to sound offensive, but am just trying to offer an honest comparison) deaf people who’ve learned how to talk. There’s just something "off."

I’ve heard even Irish actors getting it wrong. Once while I was in Ireland I went to see a performance of a David Mamet play. The two actors sounded like they were attempting a flat, nasal Midwestern accent, but they overdid the nasality (is that a word?) and ended up sounding really whiny and strained, like they weren’t getting enough oxygen, weren’t breathing as much as they should. I was the only American in the audience, and I don’t know what all the other, Irish people there thought—maybe it sounded fine to them. But it really annoyed me after awhile and only distracted me from the dialogue—which is a shame. I mean, it was a Mamet play, for crying out loud.

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lol, creatur - Americans *do* sound like deaf people who’ve learned how to talk. Didn’t you know?

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Most English groups sing with American accents. It’s a contextual thing. White Americans sing with African-American accents. Some Irish tunes would sound really dumb without at least some accentual phrasing. I lived and worked in Co. Mayo fer about five years and when I got back, people thought I was an Irishman and believe me I had no interest in being mistook. It was completely unintentional. I’m much better now after being around my fellow yanks. I agree with Creatur, Europeans are convinced they are doing a fine American accent. It can be so !@#$@ annoying.

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I think the moral of the story is, don’t try to put on accents unless you’re a really talented mimic (like my sister).

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Kerri, I don’t know what you’re talking about, or to put that in Canadian subtitles, I don’t know what you’re talking aboot.

Yeah, I know, what a cheap shot. I wish I could come up with something better, but I’m really not too familiar with Canadian accents, speech patterns, slang, etc. All I know about Canadian accents comes from 90s-era episodes of Degrassi Jr. High.

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No one makes fun of the Beatles or the Rolling Stones, imagine what their stuff would sound like in their native accents. And who the F### up there is making fun of Kevin Crawford?

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Wait, did I say 90s? I meant 80s. Damn, I’m old.

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Maybe it’s just my over-sensitivity, but is there an accent more widely and horribly faked than the American “Southern” accent? Every actor seems to think s/he can do a “Southern” accent (as if there’s just one!), but to my knowledge, I’ve only been fooled twice – both times by very fine British actors who obviously took the time to study the specific regional dialect they were imitating. Half the time, I’m able to roll my eyes once and overlook it, but sometimes it feels almost like watching black-face white actors trying to portray African-Americans.

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i think anyone who puts on a fake accent to sing is probably a great actoe but a terrible singer. but when your living around people from another country (i just moved to tennessee from ireland) sometimes i have to change my accent so peolpe can understand what im saying.

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that should be actoR!

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I think in some situations its okay…. i mean, if you’ve actually gone over to someplace, and truthfully picked up and accent there’s nothing wrong with that… its when you’re trying to fit in by using a crappy accent… thats when there is something terribly wrong.. i think…

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I think it’s probably *more* wrong to be getting all up yourself trying to sort out who is genuinely mutating and who is a desperate faker, and that it would be better to give everyone the benefit of the doubt.

With the exception of Kevin Kostner in "Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves"

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At least he gave up halfway through the movie.

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It’s not something I go looking for, but when it’s as obvious as a black-face minstrel show, I can’t ignore it.

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[Is it a violation of protocol to do three replies in a row?]

My accent is situational to some degree and largley beyond my control.

I grew up in Alabama, in a small college town near an Army base. A lot of my childhood friends were children of college professors and Army officers from all over the country, but also cotton pickers, mill workers, bootleggers, pool hustlers, aristocratic big land owners and dirt-floor-shack dwellers. I guess I’ve always been a bit of a Zelig with my speech, so even though my own provenance was closer to bootlegger / pool hustler, by young adulthood my native accent had been averaged out to something generic sounding. I got a job teaching high school in another town fifteen miles away and the students there accused me of being a “Yankee”. When I travelled to New England, folks there accused me of being a midwesterner. Now that I live in the mountains, I’m picking up a bit of southern Apple-AT-chun dialect. Whut’s a feller t’do?

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Bob: Waeullll. (The universal East Tennessee reply to almost everything) (I think that’s how you spell it…)

We call it ‘talking gravy’ in our family. When my husband comes back from visiting family in Tennessee, he talks gravy for a while, then it goes away again.

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A Belfast accent, not the real thing but the "ordinary" one is often taken to be Canadian in England.

You see they know Irish is a brogue, and it’s not Scottish, nor US of A, so it must be Canadian.

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In Canada, Irish, Scottish, Australian, and South African accents are all taken to be English, (while English accents are taken to be Australian) so you’re not alone.

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No-one has ever taken me for Canadian. I have the real accent, for good or bad.

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"Waeullll" Yep, I know exactly what you mean. It works in North Georgia, too.

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I don’t have a fake accent… I have a weird one that I invented over the years.

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English/British accents have got flattened out to some degree by modern communications/radio/tv/film, etc. One curse used to be that it defined your class, a terrible thing to be sure, and anyone in a posh job would have a telephone/business accent, and drop back into the vernacular when they went home/ recognised who it was on the phone, etc. The singing in american accents was obligatory in popular music/r’n’ for many years, Ian Dury arguably being the first person who sang/wrote in a London accent.
We wont mention Tom Cruise & Nicole Kidman in that awful Oirish film.
Or Dick Van Dyke in Mary Poppins.
It’s a help to have a non-recognisable accent - no-one knows where I’m from.

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Hmm, I find it a bit irritating when non-Irish people put on an Irish accent in an attempt to be in the "in" crowd. I’ve got a Northumbrian accent, me, and I’m not changing. No-one can ever tell where I’m from anyhow. I always get asked whereabouts in Ireland I’m from. In fact I’m pretty sure people from Ireland have asked me that before. Foreigners seem to have an easy time understanding me, but English native speakers sometimes have trouble. I was talking to a lad with quite a strong Irish accent the other day, and he had big problems understanding me. He had this half-frown kind of expression on his face as though he was having to concentrate really hard to pick up what I was saying, so I started anunciating my consonants a bit more clearly, but that made things even worse. I had to repeat the word "bus" about 7 times, and do the actions as if I was driving. Sort of kills the conversation…

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Mark, you ought to have just picked up his accent. Would have made things so much easier.

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Yes, it would have, but I didn’t want to make a complete prick of myself. I’d rather just not be understood than try and pretend I’m something I’m not.

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enunciating - I knew that looked wrong.

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I was in Cork for two months a while back and on getting there took my self on a scout round for sessions without my fiddle and just for a listen. I went into a great pub called the Sin E and sat at the bar while a session went on behind me. I got chatting with a couple of locals and this one guy pegged my English accent and asked where I was from - so I said Dundee, because thats where I’ve been for seven years now, but I was brought up in London. After asking me whether I was for the Tangerines, he was curious why I hadn’t absorbed some Dundonian by now and preceded to spend the next hour reprimanding for my lack of effort in actively doing so!!! And seeing as I’d made it as far as Cork and not managed Dundonian I might as well just go hell for leather for God’s own Cork Irish accent………..

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Hmm, yeah. I’m having second thoughts about what I wrote earlier. Maybe if I had an accent I wanted rid of, I’d be more inclined to actively change it, e.g. if I had a London accent 🙂

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What does your name mean? Do you mean Cringer, or Battlecat, off He-Man?

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Funny, I find here in Canada we embrace trying out each others accents. Especially the Newf’nlanders and the Cape Bretoners. I find that we revel in each others differences and like to let each other try on each others shoes every once in a while.

Like my friend Tom from Newfoundland. I once yelled across the parking lot at him "How ‘r ya’ Tom?" He came over and exclaimed "Oh, oi see, m’ok… but firm n’won I’s ‘ow sh’bee lad?!" He likes it when I ask him how he’s been in a ‘newfy’ accent. Sometimes I just love that I’m a Canadian.

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Wave that flag, bye, wave it good.

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Well i’s wave after wave, sea over bound I’m as happy a man as the sea will allow….. lalaalalal

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…or is that sea over bow ? 😉

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Grew up in Texas and keep coming back, my accent is unaccountably W. Kentucky, according to people who pay attention to such things. So, yes I have a fake accent, but I’m not faking.

Back in the ‘70’s we thought we were supposed to fake Irish, or Scot’s accents. We eased off because nobody understood a word of it. Later, when I started playing for the dance school, the mothers (nurses) thought it was great that I didn’t fake an accent " It sounds like they are making fun of us".

Now, I play in a band that mostly does Historical shows. I frequently get asked offstage, backstage, wherever to "talk normal". I either look helpless and say "Que?" like that guy on Fawlty Towers or throw in a few cuss-words.

LOL, Laitch I just now noticed the y’all in yr 1st post.

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I am from the Midwest. My (then) husband and I were in a pub in Kerry, and an Australian couple walked in. The bartender (American term, I know) couldn’t understand the Aussies, who couldn’t understand him or my husband. My (ex)husband couldn’t understand anybody(Acutally, he never understood me, either, but that’s more of a metaphorical reference, and therefore out of place in this discussion). So, there we were, all speaking English, and I translated for everybody. It was very funny. I never did figure out why they could all understand what I was saying.

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That reminds me of a awkward spot I got myself into once. Camping in Grand Teton National Park (only Americans would name a national park in a foreign language for something they’d normally be shocked to say in their own language). I swam out to an island in Jackson Lake, but underestimated both the distance and the coldness of the water. Almost didn’t make it to the island (leg cramps, general system shut down from the intense cold, made it only by sinking to the bottom and pushing off toward the island, finally dragging myself onto dry land). I couldn’t risk the swim back, so I waited for someone to materialize on the main shore, where I could see a rowboat tucked into some bushes.

Eventually a tourist couple hiked out of the woods onto the lake shore. I hollered across to them, explaining my situation. When they replied, I couldn’t understand a word they said. After a few minutes of this, it was clear that neither of us were understanding the other, even after I realized they were British. A classic case of two peoples divided by a common language.

So they left and I waited for someone else. Getting toward dusk, another couple showed up. I hollered my plight again. They answered—and I understood them…because they were speaking *German.* So I quickly switched to poorly remembered high school German and got my message across. They wnet to the rowboat but found it locked to a tree. Then they ran off and half an hour later a park ranger came, unlocked the boat, and rowed across to pick me up.

(I apologized up and down, but she was very gracious. "Thanks for getting me out of the office early," she said, "and for not making it another body recorvery." Some guy had drowned in the same spot the week before.)

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Brilliant, Will!

As Mr. Harmon well knows, there are certain U.S. citizens hereabouts who often attempt to affect an Irish brogue when "spakin’ in da presence" of natives of the Isle, or any other excuse they may have. I call that a "phony baloney Irish accent," but who am I to correct them to their face? I’d love to tell them to "Sh**can it!" but it would likely only negatively reinforce these tendencies. Unfortunately, I have another colleague who is fond of attempting a variety of what he thinks are "Sco”ish" accents, as well. Equally pathetic, for the most part. And so I have informed him.

Those who can readily affect the proper intonation, pitch, timbre and delivery of a regional or national accent other than their own are generally intelligent, or at least thoughtful, and have a purpose in doing so. Rarely would that be to create a smarmy affectation in an attempt to convince someone else of a "genuine interest" in the other’s [i]kul*chuh[/i].

In many cases, I’ll attempt to sing songs in something akin to the regional accent of the singers on the recordings from which I originally learned them. I honestly can’t see trying to sing "Is There For Honest Poverty" with a western U.S. accent, as such forms of speech had likely not developed anywhere in the English-speaking world at the time that Rob’t. Burns wrote it. That’s one example, and there are plenty more. However, I do suspect that if I ever bring a song in Gaelic to a session, even if I’ve managed to effect a reasonably accurate presentation of the song in the language in which it was written, I’m certain a native speaker would be able to "peg" the fact that I’d be singing same with a distinctive western U.S. regional accent.

Onnywye …

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For the benefit of the non-French speakers among us, Will swimming around in "Big Tit National Park".

I can NOT believe it. I’m getting a map.

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It’s true! Oh, the laughter! The tears rolling down my cheeks!

"Located in northwestern Wyoming, Grand Teton National Park protects stunning mountain scenery and a diverse array of wildlife. The central feature of the park is the Teton Range — an active, fault-block, 40-mile-long mountain front. The range includes eight peaks over 12,000 feet (3,658 m), including the Grand Teton at 13,770 feet (4,198 m). Seven morainal lakes run along the base of the range, and more than 100 alpine lakes can be found in the backcountry."

Somewhere in Wyoming, a pioneering Frenchman’s coffin is vibrating with amusement.

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Oops, my mistake, it actually means "Big Nipple"

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Hey Will
The Americans I know aren’t shocked calling Nippletop Mountain in the Adirondacks by its name.

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Getting away from people’s mammary fixations, and back to topic (ho ho ho): Sometimes, especially when singing a Burns song with Scots dialect, I will soften my vowels so that my American accent does not clash too badly with the ‘foreign’ words in the song. And if you hang around with people long enough, you can pick up a turn of phrase here and there that gets used unconciously (for example: Oh, did ya now?). As I have moved around the country, my own accent has picked up odds and ends from here and there. But I actively try not to put on something that is not my own.

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on that note, i listen to a looot of music from scotland, ireland, and england, and im one to very easily pick up phrases, so i sometimes do. that actually goes for my country music as well (yes, yes, i admit it).

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I hear quite a few miserable attempts at Southern American Accents, even in the American South.

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I have one anecdote to contribute to this conversation. I was born and raised in Brooklyn, NY. Now, you’d think I should sound like John Travolta or someone from The Sopranos, but it ain’t that way. You see, for some weird black-sheep syndrome, I grew up listening mostly to country music (and of course the British rock groups). I don’t know how it happened, but when I first went off to college, everyone I met thought I was from the Midwest because of my "midwestern accent." Go figure. I never heard it, but when I returned to NY after college, I was markedly aware of the difference in how I pronounced "coffee" and "dog" and "sister" versus how my homies pronounced the same words.

So, I guess I’m living proof that one can develop an accent just from the type of music one chooses to listen to (and sing).

—Jordi

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I have a friend who was born and raised in Central Texas, his parents are both Texan but he speaks with a British/Aussie accent.
Also to correct above, here in Texas ya’ll is used to refer to three to four people and all ya’ll to address a room full of people. ;)

Re: Fake Accents

What’s very sad is that I learned to speak in Pennsylvania but I speak with a slightly southern accent all the time. Occasionally, however, I will slip and pronounce something with a Scottish/English accent unintentionally. Also, after speaking in this way intentionally for a sentence or so I find it difficult to begin speaking with my southern accent again. I naturally am inclined to sing certain songs with a British accent.

Re: Fake Accents

What always amazes me is how a yank can live in Ireland for a year and come back with a full-on Irish accent, but an Irish person can live in the US for 20 years and still have a strong Irish accent. 😏

Re: Fake Accents

Ah but sure, Jack, what’re ye on about now?

Re: Fake Accents

What a lovely French accent, Kerri. 🙂

Re: Fake Accents

Phantom Button: You have to think. The Americans came from Ireland, England, France, Italy….and so on…So, I guess we don’t have as "strong" of accents as they do. 🙂

Re: Fake Accents

I wonder if Irish people who come to America to play American trad lose their Irish accents as fast as the Yanks that go to Ireland to play ITM lose their American accents. 😏

Re: Fake Accents

What kind of accent does Bob Dylan have?

Re: Fake Accents

I wonder if Kerri has a Welsh accent now…

Re: Fake Accents

When you grow up with a lot of different accents around you, you tend to be more malleable in your own, and depending on who you are talking with, or who you are listening to, it can shift. Don’t see the problem with singing a song the way you learned it, as long as you aren’t pretending you *are* who you learned it from. Some folks get bent about things that really don’t much matter. … though I don’t have a native basis to defend, so maybe I’m just conveniently flexible on that. 8)

Re: Fake Accents

Hmmm… gotta learn to look at the dates on these things! LOL!