Hop Jigs

Hop Jigs

I have a friend whose current ambition in life is to, quote, "know more hop jigs than anyone else in Cincinnati". I was wondering if I could be supplied with a list of the names of all the hop jigs you know; they’re fun tunes. A link for a discussion on hop jigs is provided; but all he wants here is a sparse list of tunes (e.g. no superfluous or even non-superfluous comments). I’m not sure if I spelled ‘superfluous’ right, but there you go.

https://thesession.org/discussions/2748#comment54283

Cheers, Alex.

Re: Hop Jigs

Try all the Slip Jigs on files here.

Re: Hop Jigs

Yeah, they’re fun, but I wouldn’t want to play all 172 of these all in one night.

Re: Hop Jigs

Why not? You might get in the Guinness Book of Records 🙂


or something

Re: Hop Jigs

Sharon Creasey played this set of Hop Jigs on vol. 2 of "Wooden Flute Obsession":

The Promenade/Michael Coleman’s Hop Jig/Comb Your Hair And Curl It

Re: Hop Jigs

Listen to Brian McNamarra’s "Fort of the Jewels". He plays several hop jigs and and discusses them in the liner notes

Posted by .

Re: Hop Jigs

Is there some confusion here? fiddlefingers said: "Try all the Slip Jigs on files here."

Perhaps this’ll help:

"They are both played in 9/8 timing (which, for one thing, leads me to wonder if she’s actually learning hop jigs; 3/4 is quite different from 9/8), but they are different. That’s probably why "hop" and "slip" are used interchangeably, because they have the same 9/8 timing.

The SLIP JIG can be described as having a "pineapple, pineapple, pineapple" rhythm, with three groups of eighth notes (three triplets per measure).
The HOP JIG, while it too has 9/8 timing, sounds like "humpty, humpty, humpty," a quarter note followed by an eighth note per triplet.

The hop jig is in a way what the single jig is to the light jig: same timing, but a different rhythm.
The single jig rhythm is different for the same reason: it too has a quarter note followed by an eighth, but of course is in 6/8 time. I hope this helps!" <http://www.diochra.com/blog.htm>;

Re: Hop Jigs

Ptarmigan is quite right. I made the same point a little while ago, discussing The Butterfly. This too, by the way, is a hop jig. I’d just add that hop jigs do have groups of three quavers (as distinct from triplets), but they will be outnumbered by the crotchet-quaver rhythm.

Just to confuse things, Breandan Breathnach, always cited as THE authority on ITM, seemed to imply they are the same.

So Alex, I presume you meant hop jigs as distinct from slip jigs, and as such, here’s another: The Boys of Ballysodare.

Good hunting.

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Re: Hop Jigs

Thanks, Ptarmigan - always interesting to learn something more about these tunes. I just went to the file here of The Boys of Ballisodare. By your definition, it seems to be a hop jig - d’you agree?

By contrast, The Foxhunters’ (so-called?) slipjig is all mixed up in its rhythmic patterns. It says pineapple humpty humpty, or humpty humpty pineapple and various combinations of these all the way through.

Now I’m starting to get really confused. Think I’ll stop caring what sort of jigs they are, and just enjoy playing them.

Re: Hop Jigs

It’s all about where you place the emphasis. In a slip jig (which will be MOSTLY groups of three quavers) the rhythm will be ‘pineapple, pineapple, PINEapple’, while in a hop jig it’s ‘HUMPty, humpty, humpty’, or even ‘HUMPty, humpty, pineapple’. In fact, the pineapples might appear more or less anywhere but they’ll be outnumbered by the humpties.

I’d also add that hop jigs tend to be played faster, which is fine if you’re talking humpties, but you do have to be careful with your pineapples.

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Re: Hop Jigs

Dear Gords,

Thank you for making life way more awesome. I snorted out loud at "… the pineapples might appear more or less anywhere but they’ll be outnumbered by the humpties." I have been puzzling over this hop jig vs. slip jig question lately, and this is actually the most helpful thing I have found on the subject, in addition to adding some levity into a fairly academic discussion.

My two cents (as a long time player who is ear-trained and doesn’t read much music) is that this idea of the grouping of rhythmic "syllables" is the key thing, and helps to deal with some of the shortcomings of notation when trying to write down the eccentricities of Irish music (or any music, really). So you can have two types of tunes that are in the same time signature, but are played quite differently.