‘Fiddlehead’!

‘Fiddlehead’!

On the basis that you learn something new every day, here’s another ‘useless’ piece of information I picked up yesterday, which might just interest you!

A ‘FIDDLEHEAD’ is a type of fern which grows to form a head resembling the scroll of a fiddle or violin, considered a local delicacy in Northern Maine.
A spring delicacy, ‘Fiddleheads’ are the young fronds of certain types of ferns.
Although the word "fiddlehead" could refer to any fern shoots, only one variety, the ostrich fern, is considered edible.
These tightly curled green shoots are picked before their leaves unfurl; gathered from the wild, they are rare and expensive.:

They look like this:
http://www.gaspesie.net/matapedia/fiddlehe.htm

& taste like this:
http://www.wholehealthmd.com/refshelf/foods_view/1,1523,245,00.html

& this:
http://www.wild-harvest.com/pages/fiddlehead.htm

So does anyone here know of any other traditional ‘instrumental’ delicacies, [especially Irish ones] which relate to our treasured musical instruments?

Re: ‘Fiddlehead’!

How about "box"ty or flute preserves.

Re: ‘Fiddlehead’!

Fiddleheads are a popular spring vegetable in most of eastern Canada. They taste a bit like spinach and a bit like asparagus.

Re: ‘Fiddlehead’!

While thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail I acquired the trail- name Fiddlehead. I was given this name more for my growing resemblence to the fern (hairy) than my instrument of choice. Growing resemblence pun not intended.

matt

Re: ‘Fiddlehead’!

Thanks guys, I’d simply never heard of them before, but then I don’t get out much!

Re: ‘Fiddlehead’!

While thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail I acquired the trail- name Fiddlehead. I was given this name more for my growing resemblance to the fern (hairy) than for my instrument of choice, which I reluctantly did without for 6 months. Growing resemblance pun not intended.

matt

Re: ‘Fiddlehead’!

I suppose you could make a salad with fiddleheads, string beans and farfalle. The latter are pasta shaped like bows.

Re: ‘Fiddlehead’!

Sorry for posting that twice.

Re: ‘Fiddlehead’!

Sorry Matt, I meant to address that last complaint to McMandolin!

Re: ‘Fiddlehead’!

Eons ago, I was camping in the Laurentian mountains north of Quebec City, and heard about fiddlehead ferns. We found some, cooked and had them for breakfast (it was morning, so as to get them while fresh!) I think we did have our fiddles with us, but it was so long ago - 1974 to precise. Nixon resigned and we flattened the car battery listening his speech.

Re: ‘Fiddlehead’!

Great story fiddlefingers. Just noticed we do have a "Fiddlehead member, but it’s unlikely they noticed this thread, as they have only posted once, way back in 2004.

https://thesession.org/members/8336

Re: ‘Fiddlehead’!

HIJACK ALERT - the following is probably totally unrelated to the thread, but it is about things that grow and look like other things.

I know its a family site so I’m trying not to use any norty words.

Back in the 80s when I used to make my living by planting "screening belts" of trees, round sand quarries, we spent a lot of time working in scrubby birch and oak woods at the side of country lanes around cheshire.

One common autumn fungus in these woods is the stinkhorn - (Phallicus Imudicus), which is the same size and shape as a mans erect thingy, (but smells of rotting meat).

Another common thing found in the woods at the back of lay-byes was pornographic magazines, which had been discarded over the fence.

An amusing irony was that the additional nutrients available in the rotting paper would encourage the growth of phallicus impudicus in the immediate vicinity - so it was common to find one of the said magazines decaying in the undergrowth and closely surrounded by a circle of the said fungus.

Re: ‘Fiddlehead’!

The Common Stinkhorn is an indelicacy rather than a delicacy. I certainly wouldn’t eat one.

Re: ‘Fiddlehead’!

The chanterelle is another matter. It is a horn-shaped mushroom of a pale orange colour and smells sweetly fruity.

I have never tasted one because the time we spent all day picking them when I was a child my father nobly insisted on eating the whole lot just in case they were poisenous.

Re: ‘Fiddlehead’!

Gallopede (whoever you are) - I have a book, which declares the Common Stinkhorn to be poisonous.

Given the appalling smell, not to mention the appearance, I wonder how they know?