Some translation questions concerning "The Rocky Road to Dublin"

Some translation questions concerning "The Rocky Road to Dublin"

Hi, I’m German and I have some trouble with a few passages on "The Rock Road to Dublin". Could you please tell me what they mean? I’ve indicated the passages I don’t understand with asterisks.

Then I took a stroll, All among the *quality*, My bundle it was stole, In a *neat locality*

Down among the pigs I played some *funny rigs*

Saw I was *a hobble in*

The text can be found at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Rocky_Road_to_Dublin

Thanx a lot………….Jens

Re: Some translation questions concerning "The Rocky Road to Dublin"

Well, this is de Republic, you know and we don’t have upper, middle and whatever classes you’re having. Officially that is. But the song refers back to earlier times and ‘the quality’ would be the gentlemen and ladies of the day - the monied classes.
‘Neat locality’ - Merrion Square rather than Ballymun!! i.e. where the monied class might live.
I’ll leave it to Bodhran Bliss to explain ‘funny rigs’ - bound to know that sort of thing. All the best.

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Re: Some translation questions concerning "The Rocky Road to Dublin"

* I was a hobble in* The Galway boys see that their compatriot is losing the fight with the Liverpudlians, despite the use of his blackthorn stick, and join in on his side. No doubt if he was winning they’d have joined the other side.

*funny rigs* tunes. Just a fix to get it to rhyme. Poetic License. If you like, he’s blended reels and jigs to get rigs.

Re: Some translation questions concerning "The Rocky Road to Dublin"

Hussar

Bliss’s son and heir does a mean version of the ‘Rocky Road’!

A much requested number when he’s in the bar i can assure you!

Re: Some translation questions concerning "The Rocky Road to Dublin"

A rig is a practical joke.

The "cabin" that was found for Paddy was with the pigs, possibly other financially unfortune travellers such as himself. He then describes his activities onboard the ship:

"I played some funny rigs, danced some hearty jigs."

Re: Some translation questions concerning "The Rocky Road to Dublin"

@Craymcla: Guess you’re right about those rigs! Just found another thread supporting your evidence:

https://thesession.org/discussions/6138/comments#comment130954

… just wonderin’ what kind of rigs one could play "down among the pigs"????

Re: Some translation questions concerning "The Rocky Road to Dublin"

@ John Bull:
Where does the name you’re using come from, by the way? I just know it stands for English/British, but what’s the origin of it?
"Paddy", the equivalent for the Irish, is it used because there are many Irish ppl of that name?

…just curious…

Re: Some translation questions concerning "The Rocky Road to Dublin"

John Bull comes from the common English name John, which in turn is derived from an ancient Hebrew word for toilet, and the bull being the self- image of the English (if you’re English), or what they talk, if you’re not.

Paddy is short from Patrick. St. Patrick was actually British, and the name is still used in Scotland for a thistle or a football "team".

Re: Some translation questions concerning "The Rocky Road to Dublin"

That’s a bit misleading, luap. More specifically in Scotland, it means a cr*p football team which Glasgow TV pundits pretend to support in order not to be outed as H*ns. See also "St Mirren" (who was actually Irish)

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Re: Some translation questions concerning "The Rocky Road to Dublin"

"John Bull comes from the common English name John, which in turn is derived from an ancient Hebrew word for toilet, and the bull being the self- image of the English (if you’re English), or what they talk, if you’re not."

That’s about the size and shape of it all right. ;-P

Re: Some translation questions concerning "The Rocky Road to Dublin"

One team in Glasgow ! (There’s only one team in Glasgow!)

- Chris (lapsed Partick Thistle fan, and yes everything above is true 🙁)

Re: Some translation questions concerning "The Rocky Road to Dublin"

St Patrick was French.

Re: Some translation questions concerning "The Rocky Road to Dublin"

No way!!…. His father was a Gallagher His mother was a Grady His aunt was an O’Shaughnessy His uncle was a Brady

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Re: Some translation questions concerning "The Rocky Road to Dublin"

‘A hobble in’. I think it’s actually ‘a hobblin’ ‘, as in he had his shillelagh with him so he must have had a gammy leg, and was hobbling without it.

Re: Some translation questions concerning "The Rocky Road to Dublin"

St. Patrick was born in what was to become Scotland, but both parents were from Rome (if you believe everything google comes up with, that is).

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Re: Some translation questions concerning "The Rocky Road to Dublin"

But he was still a gentleman, wasn’t he?