Wyldeman Fluter’s fifty comments

  • Yeeeeeooooooowwwwwwwww!!!!!!!!

    Hello, I was wondering if anybody knew the origin of the above phrase, and similar exclamations which can be heard at sessions? Is it an established part of the session, or a relatively recent phenomena? I'd also like to know what members think of the pra... more…

  • Re: Will the COVID-19 pandemic be the end of pub sessions?

    "Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor? HELL NO!" more…

  • Re: Thoughts? Old Swiss keyed flute with ivory headjoint

    Thank you for sharing those articles Terry, I had forgotten your graph showing mention of the flute in The Old Bailey Proceedings, there's a real rise during the "flute-mania" period (spiking around 1830. ) Calum, thank you for finding the primary source ... more…

  • Re: Thoughts? Old Swiss keyed flute with ivory headjoint

    Looking at TheOldBaileyOnline I notice quite a number of people were trialed for "Burglariously Breaking and Entering" premises and making off with flutes, alongside more common household items, before pawning them. This suggests they were considered a h... more…

  • Re: Thoughts? Old Swiss keyed flute with ivory headjoint

    Kenny, the quote in question definitely says man and not gentleman, that is how it is written in Reading in the History of the Flute, with the following reference; The Athenæum, 19th of August 1829, page 516, (Review of James's The Flutist's Magazine). T... more…

  • Re: Thoughts? Old Swiss keyed flute with ivory headjoint

    The quote in question above does say "one man out of ten" rather than "gentleman," so that will include; yobs, cads, villains, scoundrels, brigands, n'er-do-wells and street urchins, and finally, those unfortunate enough to have found themselves "bound ... more…

  • Re: Thoughts? Old Swiss keyed flute with ivory headjoint

    "We take it for granted that one man out of ten plays the flute" was not a retrospective estimate, but a quote Robert Bigio presents in his Readings in the History of the Flute, taken from a review of W. N. James' Flutist Magazine, that was published in... more…

  • Re: Flute (breath?) vibrato

    Glottal stops is definitely the most likely technique that Harry Bradley uses to achieve this sound. So one could say that glottal stopping is the technique, and the effect achieved is tremolo. more…

  • Re: Flute (breath?) vibrato

    If people outside of the U.K. can't see the Iplayer clips, here is one that's been uploaded to Youtube. more…

  • Re: Flute (breath?) vibrato

    Strictly speaking, I don't think the technique used by Harry Bradley towards the end of the first clip is actual vibrato, but a separate technique. Vibrato involves a change of pitch to a held tone, whereas Harry rapidly stops the volume of the note and r... more…